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3,500 Enroll As Summer Session Opens 




Lines in the heat of Boyden yesterday proved-that the best use for all 
they make good fans. 



Staff Photo/Gib Fullertor 

the registration papers is that 




University of Massachusetts 



June 26. 1973 



Volume 2, Issue 1 



Magician Smith Here Tomorrow 



A highlight of the entertainment 
season comes to UMass with the 
appearance of C. Shaw Smith and 
Company tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Campus Center Auditorium. 
Admission is free. 

An evening of "unusual en- 
tertainment," this 90 minute show 
is made for laughs and relaxation 
and headed by world-traveled 
magician-humorist C. Shaw Smith 
featuring some surprise acts by his 



performing assistants. "It is a one- 
man show with others," claims the 
head performer, "straight out of 
old vaudeville. It is designed with 
pizzazz for modern audiences, 
entertainment many college 
students literally have never seen 
before in person." 

Mr. Smith has appeared in 45 of 
the 50 United States and in 27 
countries around the world. Most 
of his entertainment background 




Ladies and gentlemen...! Come to see a magician disappear into 
thin air, which is much more difficult than disappearing into thick 
air. C. Shaw and Company will present an evening of unusual en- 
tertainment with their magic show tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Campus Center Auditorium. Admission is free. 



has been slanted toward adults, but 
this special performance of 
"Wacky Wizardry" is designed to 
appeal to the whole span of people 
from 6 to % and over. 

Live animals and people make 
up the troupe. "When a man 
vanishes into thin air, that's more 
difficult than using thick air," says 
Smith. He and the troupe feel the 
show is clever, a little corny and 
very friendly. 

After finishing college (Davidson 
in North Carolina) and teaching 
English for a while, during World 
War II Mr. Smith entertained over 
2.000,000 service men while 
traveling over 125,000 miles around 
the globe. A.P. and UP. newsmen 
called his unit "The troupe that 
wouldn't come home." 

With an MA. in English (UNO 
and a keen interest in drama and 
student life in general, he has long 
been associated in the educational 
field. He has been a teacher of 
English, general secretary of a 
campus Y.M.C.A., a military 
school commandant of cadets, 
college union and placement 
director and coordinator of student 
activities, while maintaining his 
name and reputation in en- 
tertainment circles. 

At this special show for the 
Summer Program Council plans 
are to use unsuspecting members 
of the audience who will help the 
professional entertainers perform 
for the enjoyment of the crowd. 
This is a modern show said by 
observers to be wholesome and 
happy entertainment. "A little 
humor can do wonders in this time 
of tension," says Smith. "It's a 
great gift today to be able to laugh 
with other people and especially at 
ourselves." 

The purpose of the Shaw Smith 
performance is to fool the people, 
ves, but most especially to give 
pleasure that comes from clean, 
clever, light entertainment. 



By CINDY GONET 

It seems that not too long ago finals were upon us and all the tension and 
anxiety that goes along with them. However, a few thousand students are 
thinking of more school and more learning and more worrying. 

Yesterday at Boyden Gymnasium, about 3,500 students registered for 
summer session 1973. The eight-week semester begins today and runs 
through August 17. Departments are offering about 400 courses with 
faculty appointments numbering several hundred. 

All the regulations applying to UMass during regular session apply to 
summer school. 

The Summer Activities Committee, which will be deciding which fun to 
afford students is offering a varied and balanced program of events in- 
cluding the arts, intramural sports, films, concerts, sales and dances. A 
series of noon recitals in the Campus Center Concourse will present 
musicians from the UMass faculty, visiting artists, and popular folk and 
jazz artists. A film series provides at least one film per week and plays of 
professional quality will be scheduled. 

The School of Education is sponsoring a series of summer workshops. 
The Program includes about 35 workshops one and two weeks in length 
and about 100 special events sponsored by the various learning clusters at 
the School of Education. 

The Division of Continuing Education also opened its first summer 
session of evening courses yesterday. 

Services made available to the oppressed in this Pioneer Valley include 
fully staffed Health Services. The Infirmary tries to help students 
prevent health programs which might limit the effectiveness of their 
college experience. Direct services to students are supported by the 
Health fee. 

A staff of physicians, nurses, psychologists, pharmacists, physical 
therapists, technologists, and other personnel trained to meet student 
health needs provide care at the Infirmary. Students are encouraged to 
use the Health Services to obtain health care in the same way they would 
consult their family physician and would use the community hospital. 

The Counseling Center located at Whitmore supports the student's 
efforts to develop into a mature, useful, self-fulfilled member of society. 
The Center's day-to-day work with tile student-client involves 
psychological counseling on personal, social, educational, and vocational 
problems. 

The Foreign Student Adviser offers assistance to foreign students, 
faculty, and staff, and should be consulted in all matters pertaining to 
their official immigration status while in the United States. In addition, 
the adviser may be consulted regarding any other problems which a 
person from another country encounters while at the University, such as 
housing, financial matters, and personal relations. 

The Housing Office supervises residence hall room assignments and 
room changes, maintains the master record of resident and non-resident 
student local addresses, and coordinates the room security deposit 
system. All changes of local address must be recorded with the Housing 
Office. 

The Financial Aid Office has information concerning area em- 
ployment, scholarships, loans, etc. The Office assists students with 
financial counseling and also aids in finding suitable employment, 
awards, loans, grants, scholarships, and assigning part-time work. 

The Student Activities Office in the Campus Center is the focal point for 
social, community, governmental, social action, cultural, and 
educational enrichment activity, in addition to serving as the 
headquarters for Recognized Student Organizations (RSO) and the 
Program Office. It provides resource material and counsel on program 
planning, organizational work and group dynamics, entertainment 
selection and procurement, service and aid projects for campus and 
community, special interest activities and recreation, as well as counsel 
on budgeting. Durchasing, and contracting. The Student Activities Office 
also provides banking, bookkeeping, and auditing service for student 

organizations. 

Participating in extracurricular activities offers opportunities to 
further the broader objectives of a college experience. More than 50 
professional clubs on campus extend classroom interest through closer 
contact with members of the faculty and representatives of the 
professions. For those interested in communications, there are several 
campus publications. A wide range of social and cultural programs are 
coordinated through the residential colleges. 



Charity Beer Fest 
Goes Over Big 
In Northampton 




By MARK VOGLER 

Several couples danced to 
the polka while hundreds of 
others raised their steins 
saying "Ach Du Lieber". 

Sound like Germany? Well, 
one didn't even have to leave 
the city to get a Bavarian taste 
of beer, sauerkraut or knock- 
wurst this past weekend. 

It was all imported to the 
three country fairgrounds- 
compliments of the Nor- 
thampton Rotary Club. 

The occasion was the 2nd 
annual beer fest for the city 
and another effort by the local 
Rotarians to raise funds for 
charity purposes. Officials 
were optimistic that they 
would exceed last year's 
profits of $5,000. 

More than 4500 persons filed 
through the gates during the 
two day period--"Well over 
3,000 on Saturday", one official 
said. 

Roman J. Tozloski who was 
busy drawing beer from one of 
the six serving stations 
reported that close to 140 half- 
barrels of beer were con- 
sumed. 

Tozloski admitted it was "a 
lot of beer to go through", but 



added that the festival was 
running smoothly and no major 
difficulties had been en- 
countered because of the heavy 
drinking. 

"Everybody had a good time 
last year and that's the way 
things went this weekend," he 
said. 

"Gee, it's just like a 
Bavarian festival... German 
beer, people dancing and 
singing... everybody having a 
gay time." 

People drank the German 
beer, made merry "and also 
ate a great deal," noted Paul 
M. Garvey, who was in charge 
of the food department. 

Over 4500 knockwursts, 7500 
gallons of sauerkraut, 2500 ears 
of corn and 500 pounds of 
shelled peanuts were con- 
sumed during the beer fest, he 
said. 

A beer haul and a large tent 
with nearly 100 picnic tables 
underneath accommodated the 
people while the Bavarian 
Barons, an 8-piece German 
band from New York, supplied 
the music. 

It was a good ole German 
beer fest. 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page 3 



Page 2 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Editor-in-Chief Stephen G. Tripoli 

Managing Editor-Business Manager Gib Fullerton 

News Editor Cindy Gonet 

Sports Editor Mike Brophy 

Contributors Steve Ruggles , Marty Kelley 




We dedicate this paper to Sam, (above) who we feel can get the 
best use out of it. 



Crier 
Recruitment ! 



Join Sam 

and His Friends 

Tonight at 7 



Room 402 
Student Union 



THE ART SHOP j 

Amherst Carriage Shops ■ 

Complete Artist end Drafting | 

Materials | 

WINSOR NEWTON Koh-I-Noor 

Chartpac 



Steve Tripoli 



The Summer Scene 



Whether you're a summer school student new or 
familiar with the area, a winter student here on a 
summer job, or a year round employee on campus, 
summer's here, and we're all on the UMass scene 
together. I guess there are a few things worthy of note 
going on here this summer, and now is a good time to 
see what's up. 

On the entertainment side, the Summer Program 
Council has put together some really fine en- 
tertainment this summer. Their program features all 
kinds of music, recent movies, art, and even a 
magician and the Howdy Doody revival featuring 
Buffalo Bob himself. Most of it's free, and most of it's 
worth taking in, even if you have to pay a few rubles. 
The Amherst Film Coop also has four or five classic 
films lined up. So if you're in the market for en- 
tertainment you'll do OK this summer. 

For those of you who have any inclination toward 
an extra curricular activity that isn't banned by the 
Church, there's the Crier. Just come on up to the 
second floor of the Student Union (Room 402) and ask 
for me or Gib Fullerton or Cindy Gonet. If we're not 
around or if you don't feel like walking, our number is 
345-0617. We can use all the help we can get, and you 
can have a good time and maybe pick up a little ex- 
perience in the newspaper business. If you think it's 
up your alley, look us up. 

On the more serious side are a few things that 
should be of concern to those of you who are regular 



students at the University. The most obvious is the 
proposed parking fee hikes, which have been 
revised for what seems to be the hundredth time, the 
new plan calling for student parking fees of either 
five, seventeen, or forty-one dollars, depending on the 
proximity of your parking space to the center of 
campus. As usual, there are a lot of hassles involved 
with the old students vs. administration game, and if 
you're concerned (you should be) you ought to keep 
track of what's going on with the proposed hikes and 
let your Student Government and especially the 
Administration know how you feel about them. 
Hopefully you'll be able to get some idea of what's 
going on in future editions of this newspaper. 

Also of concern to those of you who are regulars 
here are the proposed board hikes, which could raise 
the price of a meal ticket $20 or higher. Find out 
what's going on, and let your opinion be heard. The 
man to talk to in this case is Food Services Director 
Joel Stoneham, a controversial figure on campus 
himself. It seems as if his credibility sinks slowly into 
the West a little more every day, while he gains the 
reputation of not being the most above board person 
to deal with on campus. 

As a whole, it should be a decent summer, so stay 
cool and enjoy yourselves. You'll be hearing from me 
again. 

Steve Tripoli is Editor-in-Chief of the Crier. 



Editorial Points 



For those of you who are new 
here, that huge monstrosity in the 
middle of campus is the new 
library, tallest in the world. We 
really don't need all that room for 
books, but it's nice to have a 
world's record right in your own 

back yard. 

****** 

By the way, we're giving a great 
course in Room 402 Student Union 
this summer. No credit, no pay, but 
maybe a good time. Check it out. 



UMass in the summer is that there 
aren't a million people floating 
around. Just a nice, managable 

400,000. 

****** 

University efficiency : Of all the 
places to house the on campus 
summer school students, they 
chose Orchard Hill, one of the 
furthest points from the middle of 
campus. But we won't say 
anything. Better not to confuse 

them with facts. Or common sense. 

****** 



dedicated to our news editor's dog, 
a pedigree Samoyed. His office 
hours are 10 to 6 Monday through 
Friday. 



One of the nicer things about incidentally, this newspaper is 



Crier Quiz 




****** 

UMass is like a big piece of 
cheese. For the summer schoolers, 
you start to nibble now, but by the 
time you get back in January, she's 

all gone. 

****** 

For all of you who like to start 
early, the Bluewall won't open till 
six. It you're really thirsty, do 
what your local Lady of The Night 
advertises, "Hold it". 



Letters To 
The Editor 

The Crier will accept letters to 
the editor. The only requirements 
are that they be typed at sixty 
spaces and double spaced, and that 
the author (s) sign them and in- 
clude a telephone number for 
reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but 
a reference number must be in- 
cluded. The Crier reserves the 
right to edit letters either for space 
or content according to the 
judgement of the editors. 



Hey kids! Can you guess who this famous American is? (No kid- 
ding, you'd probably recognize his name if you heard it! ) Well, if any 
of you people out there come to the Crier office (402 Student Union) 
and tell us who our mystery man is YOU will get your picture in 
Thursday's edition! Of course, this applies to the first correct 
respondent. By the way, if we're not at the office when you arrive 
just leave your name, telephone number, and answer under the door. 
Deadline for the contest is Wednesday at noon, so hurry! Oh, by the 
way, we have a hint for you. Mystery Man is now living in Costa 
Rica, probably because it Costa Plente to live in the USA! Good luck, 
folks ! 




CRIER NEWS HOTLINE 
545-0617 



Creation 

Antiques 

the finest in 

clothes 
jewelry 
glass 
etcetera 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy * trade, too. 



CO 



<* e 




% 



© 



Regency Stylists 

It's a place to get the new natural 
look into your hair .... 

189 North Pleasant St., Amherst 



World ' s Tallest Opens Today 




Crier photos above by Alan Chapman, right and below by Steve Ruggles. 

The new University Library (above) is finally getting straightened 
out. The card catalog above right, and the stacks below are being 
filled in time for opening. 




Discount Imported Clothes 

THE MERCANTILE 

9 East Pleasant St. 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 

Bedspreads Beads 

Mugs Jewelry 

Pipes & Papers 




By CINDY GONET 

Remember the olden days of last 
summer, when searching for the 
book you wanted at Goodell, it 
invariably turned out that you had 
to trudge down to level one. It was 
like descending into an inferno, 
because as you progressed to the 
bowels of the library, the tem- 
perature increased a few degrees 
with every step. 

Well, things have changed. The 
new University library is now 
offering air conditioned comfort 
anc .levators. 

And you can stop betting with 
friends as to when the first person 
jumps off the 28 story monstrocity, 
because the windows must first be 
broken to escape. 

Students attending summer 
session, be they either stupid or 
dedicated, will have a reason to 
frequent the library, if only to say 
they have been inside the world's 
tallest and most phallic one. 

No longer will the trod upon 
students run from SBA to the 
Music Room to the Education and 
to the Landscape Architecture 
libraries attempting to become 
cultured because the University 
library has become the central 
location for these scattered 
collections around campus. 

To describe this envy of 
Catherine the Great, the first floor 
is primarily an information area, 
equipped with an information and 
circulation desk. The circulation 
desk offers only limited service, as 
there is a circulation department 
on one of the upper floors. 

The reference service area and 
card catalogue are located in the 
two story podium, or lower area. 
Gordon Fretwell, Associate 
Director for Public Servies, said 
that he expects the bulk of the 
students will come here because it 
is also an area of consultation. This 
area also houses a special room for 
micro-film reading, along with a 
copy machine to duplicate the 
micro-film. This podium offers a 
separate room for newspapers and 
reading tables. Fretwell added 
that there will also be a special 
lounge section on the floor con- 
taining the Kennedy Memorial 
Browsing collection. 

The second floor of the library is 
the "Hub of Activity," said 
Fretwell. This is the main section 
for circulation and reserve 
reading. 

The subsequent floors are divided 
into a three category pattern, said 
Fretwell. One floor is a shelving 



area with individual study tables 
seating 56 people. The next floor is 
a study area with two large study 
sections and four smaller study 
rooms used for various special 
purposes. This floor also has two 
study rooms geared for the han- 
dicapped. Small individual study 
rooms with built-in desks are in- 
cluded on this level. Coin operated 
typewriters will be made 
available. 

On the average, these study 
floors should be able to seat 84 
people. There are six of these 
levels through the library. 

The third floor in this sequence is 
a shelving floor. This three floor 
pattern repeats throughout the 
remaining floors, except on two 
levels which are generally study 
areas similiar to the fourth floor of 
Goodell. Level 26 is another ex- 
ception. This area will be used for 
meetings relating to the library. 
Fretwell said it is hoped that the 
area will eventually be used for 
audio-visual equipment. Level 25 is 
used for rare book collections and 
University Archives. 

Fretwell said that one of the 
major differences from Goodell is 
the stacking of 90 per cent of the 
magazine periodicals and the 
added room for 200,000 books, 
which Goodell hadn't the capacity. 

After the novelty of the new 
building wears off, Fretwell 



<IMMtOi«Tc\ /CONTACtX 
* m T N n'° N W*( LfHS L 

IMMSlfCr r 1 JUPFLItS F 




I'M North Plrns.ini St., Xn.h.rvi 



projected a 25 per cent increase in 
the use of library facilities. 

It is not as yet known what 
Goodell will be used for. Some 
statistics in regard to the library 
follow : 



Project Cost: 

Gross Area : 

Net Assignable Space: 

Non Assignable Space: 

Percent Assignable Space 

Sq. Ft. Cost: 

Building Cost. 

Equipment Cost: 

Book Capacity: 

Seating Capacity. 

Heiciht. 

Etitrance Level Elevation: 

Top ot Brick Wall Elevation 



$16,800,000 

405,000 

280,000 

119,000 

70.74 

$35.67 

$14,447,023 

$850,000 

1,600,000 

3,000 

296 ft. 4 1/8 in. 

237 ft. 

533 ft. 4 1/8 in. 



Architects: 



Edward Durrell Stone 



' Hv i ii ' iimmii i i i niiiii 



rmTrrm 



RALLY 



for Wounded Knee 

Friday 2p.m. 

place to be announced 

Speakers: 

Dave Adamson 
CBS Photographer 

Bill Zimmerman 
Airlift Participant 



< ftll| l |'ll l .l,ll l l ll |i|||III I UII II I III i l lll 



EATING PLACE 

Campus Plaza Shopping Center 

8,000 PEOPLE CAN'T BE WRONG 

That's how many people eat at 
AAcAAanus' every week. Why don't 
you join them? 

FAMILY MEALS AT FAMILY PRICES 

BREAKFAST * LUNCH * DINNER 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 



NUGENTS V J 
WELCOMES N 



YOU! 



Tel. 2.j4h;i«:i_ 




Come in and take advantage 
of our store wide 
SUMMER SALE! 

Campus Plaza - Next to Zayre's 



mm 



** 



Page 4 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



And 




Mr. and Mrs. Peter Tanner, who will entertain on the CC Con- 



course tomorrow at n< 



MH Summer Theatre begins I 

For a fourth summer the Mount Holyoke College Summer Theatre has 
placed its festive green-and-white striped tent on the green of the College 
campus, and the assembled company of 21, ten appretices, six jour- 
neymen and five staff members, are busily rehearsing and making 
preparations for a sell-out season for Mount Holyoke's own Summer 

The 311 " 6 - „ . ... , , *u«* 

A series of seven comedy hits in the tent and a children s play in the 

Amphitheater will run from June 26 through August 18 under the direc- 
tion of Jim Cavanaugh, producer-director of the Summer Theatre, 
director of the Laboratory Theatre, and associate professor of theatre 
arts at Mount Holyoke during the academic year. He will be assisted by 
an associate producer-director, Sandy Shinner, who is a veteran of the 
1971 and 1972 Summer Theatre seasons. 

Opening the season with the children's theatre production "Androcles 
and the Lion," the Summer Theatre has scheduled seven adult comedies 
for the striped tent. Beginning the tent season July 3 through 7 with "Play 
It Again Sam," by Woody Allen, the summer will feature "Ready When 
You Are C.B.," July 10 through 14; Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit," July 
17 through 21 "Bus Stop" by William Inge July 24 through 28; "Poor 
Richard " July 31 through August 4; "A Thousand Clowns" August 7 
through 11 ; and Shakespeare's 'As You Like It" August 14 through 18. 

In January a group of Summer Theatre veterans and friends presented 
a benefit production of "The Fantasticks" which raised another $3,000 
toward the budget and allowed preparation to begin for a fourth summer 
of productions. The theatre has steadily increased its audience support 
since its beginnings in 1970, reaching a record 85% capacity in 1972. The 
Summer Theatre subscribes to the ensemble philosophy, whereby actors 
serve on backstage crews when not performing. Apprentices, high school 
students, and journeymen, former apprectices desiring more specialized 
experience, work with the company in all phases of production. 

Located on the Mount Holyoke College campus at the junction of Routes 
116 and 47 in South Hadley, the Mount Holyoke Summer Theatre presents 
performances Tuesday through Saturday weekly. Tickets at $2.50 and 
$3 50 with a $1.00 discount for students Tuesday through Thursday, are 
available by phoning the box office at (413) 538-2406 beginning June 18 
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day except Sunday. Season tickets are also 
available. 



Tomorrow at noon on the 
Campus Center Concourse the 
Summer Program Council is 
sponsoring the first Music Hour of 
the Summer. Featured in this 
performance will be Tanner, 
Tanner, and Chesnut, with music 
for flute, horn, and percussion. 

Joanne Dickinson Tanner is a 
native of Winchester, N.H., and is a 
graduate of the Eastman School of 
Music. She has studied with Marcel 
Moyse, Joseph Mariano, and 
Wallace Mann (of the National 
Symphony Orchestra, Washington, 
DC). While still in high school she 
was a member of the Pioneer 
Valley Symphony and a par- 
ticipant in the Old Deerfield 
Summer Chamber Music concerts. 
She has played in the Rochester 
Philharmonic Orchestra, and has 
been on the music faculties of 
Kansas State University and 
Wisconsin State University, Eau 
Claire. Presently she is a Visiting 
Instructor of Flute at the 
University of Massachusetts and is 
also a member of the music 
If acuities of Smith College and Mt. 
Holyoke College. 

i This concert marks her first solo 
appearance in this area in several 

years. 

Dr Peter H. Tanner was born in 
Rochester, NY., and is a graduate 
of the Eastman School of Music, 
where he studied percussion with 
William Street. He holds a Ph.D. in 
Musicology from the Catholic 
University of America in 
Washington, DC. 

He has played with the 
Rochester Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, the United States Marine 
Band, and the Chautaugua, NY. 
Symphony Orchestra. As a 
rnarimbist, he has appeared on the 
Ed Sullivan and Arthur Godfrey 
television programs 



Before joining the staff at the 
University of Massachusetts in 
1969, he formerly taught at Kansas 
State University and Wisconsin 
State University, Eau Claire, 
where he was the chairman of the 
Department of Theory- 
Composition. His present 
professional activities include the 
position of tympanist in the 
Springfield Symphony Orchestra. 
Walter Chesnut received his 
Bachelor of Music Degree from the 
University of Michigan in 1958 and 
his Master of Music Degree from 
that same institution in 1959. He 
was a member of the marching and 
symphony band, under the 
direction of William D. Revelh, 
from 1954-59. In 1958, '59 and again 
in 1966, Mr. Chesnut was solo 
cornet with the University of 
Michigan Symphony Band and was 
a teaching fellow on trumpet. In 
1959 he was soloist before the 
National Band Directors Con- 
ference in Chicago, Illinois. While 
at Michigan he was a student of 
Clifford P. Lillya. 

From 1959 to 1962 Mr. Chesnut 
was band director (grades 4-12) in 
Colon, Michigan and from 1962-1966 
he was junior high band and or- 
chestra director in Sturgis, 
Michigan. His bands and or- 
chestras were consistent first 
division winners in district and 
state competition. 

In 1966 Mr. Chesnut returned to 
the University of Michigan to start 
work on a Doctor of Musical Arts 
Degree in Trumpet. Mr. Chesnut 
was a clinician, soloist, and ad- 
judicator throughout Indiana and 
Michigan while living in the mid- 
west. -. 
Active in all branches of music, 

Mr. Chesnut is a member of 
Kappa. Kappa Psi, Phi Mu Alpha, 
and Pi Kappa Lambda music 



fraternities and societies. He is 
past president of District 11 
Michigan School Band and Or- 
chestra Association and past 2nd 
Vice President of the State 
M.S.B.O.A. Association. He was 
selected for membership in the 
American School Band Directors 
Association in 1966. 

Mr. Chesnut has been active as a 
soloist and clinician since he 
arrived in the East. He has con- 
ducted All Star Bands in 
Massachusetts and Vermont, and 
has served as a clinician at the 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and 
New Hampshire All-State con- 
ferences. 

Mr. Chesnut has been a member 
of seven symphony orchestras and 
is presently the principal trumpet 
in the Springfield Symphony Or- 
chestra, a position he has held 
since 1967. In 1970 he toured 
Europe with the University of 
Massachusetts Chorale as soloist 
and member of the Brass Trio. His 
duties at the University of 
Massachusetts include all applied 
trumpet lessons, and he is Director 
of the Brass Choir. He is a member 
of the faculty brass trio and is an 
active performer on and off 
campus. 



People Are Needed For 
Vista, Peace Corps 



Living Levels II: water beds 

This week only - 1 free mattress 
with purchase of frame and liner 

Sweet Lorettas: old and 
unique clothing 

1 Cook Place - in the alley - Amherst 



Donald S. Call - OPTICIAN 

56 Main St, Amherst - 253-7002 
Contact Lent Fluids 
Bausch & Lomb - American Optical 

Sunglasses 
Photo Gray & Photo Sun 
that changes color 

All Types of Rx Eye Wear 

We Sell Only Eye Glasses Tit To Wear 



The image of the Peace Corps 
and VISTA volunteer as a young, 
liberal arts college graduate is 
being expanded as increasing 
numbers of men and women with 
specialized backgrounds respond 
to the call for assistance to 
developing countries overseas and 
poverty agencies here at home. 

Todd Baumgardt, a former 
VISTA volunteer who now recruits 
for both Peace Corps and VISTA, 
says that the current need for 
experienced people is a result of 
"growing up" on the part of both 
agencies as well as the people they 
serve. 

"Developing nations, for in- 
stance, have come a long way in 
sophistication and the ability to 
analyze their needs since 1961 
when the Peace Corps got star- 
ted," said the representative, who 
added that requests from these 
countries have become very 
specific; architects, city planners, 
people who've owned or operated a 
business, civil engineers, farmers, 
construction workers, teachers, 
draftsmen, and home economists. 
Baumgardt believes that 
recruiting people with specialized 
skills is a much harder Job than 
finding college seniors. In tne 
first place, there's no con- 
centration of qualified people like 
we find on campus. Experienced 
people are everywhere. Making it 
even more difficult for us is the 
fact that people in mid-career and 
people who have retired or are 
about to retire don't think of 
themselves as volunteer 
material." 



The combination of age and 
experience generally makes it 
easier for a new volunteer to be 
accepted by the community inj 
which ht works. 

VISTA and Peace Corps pay a 1 
living allowance, all travel, 
vacation, and medical expenses. 

Recruiters will be at the Howard 
Johnson's Motor Lodge. 401 Russel 
Street, in Hadley on June 25-27. A . x 
special phone will be in operation j 

from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. during those j n'*A-£*>QuNi cjrr FRJWtf5 f «i 
days. The phone number: .^fi-nifin |7>g toS'lUV arM.-"" 1 *™ — 



Amherst's Tire Store- 
Firestone Shell Jetzon 

MICHELIN X Veith HHEB 

Le Hovre Rodiol Tires ••• Steel Belled 

Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 







PLAZA SHELL & 



Amherst — Northampton Rood 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253- 



iii 



m& 






OPIN M HOURS 



ft.W 

TfWIAf 




WE MEET YOUR CHALLENGE 

• The COMFORT of layer cutting 

• The STYLE of modern length 

• Give Stylish comfort all summer 

• for two bucks and a half see Hal 
COLLEGETOWN STYLING SHOP 

183 NORTH PLEASANT ST.. AMHERST 

on the way into town 



The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Pag* 5 



"The Family" To Open At Art Gallery 




The Student Union Art Gallery at 
UMass will open for the summer on 
Wednesday, June 27 through 
Friday, July 6 with an exhibition 
titled "Family". This is an 
exhibition of objects produced by an 
area social group made up of 
people who share an interest in 
bluegrass music and country 
living. Most have been (or are 
now) associated with UMass. The 
"Family" consists of architects, 
painters, graphic designers, print 
makers, etc. and the objects to be 
exhibited are items produced 
outside each individuals normal 
field of endeavor. One painter 
makes wooden toys, his wife 



makes brightly colored in- 
terlocking puzzles. A printmaker 
does weaving, one of the children 
has already had her own show. 

The exhibition will be open to the 
public, free of charge, Monday 
through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m., Saturday and Sunday from 1 
p.m. to 3 p.m. and Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. 

On Friday evening, June 29 from 
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. there will be an 
open reception for the "Family", 
complete with bluegrass music and 
appropriate refreshments. 

The event is being sponsored by 
the Summer Activities Program. 



IITIONEE 

)MF0RT 



AMHERSTf>m 

AMITY ST. , AMHERST 



[253-5426 



j Combining the Talents otEAadamy Award Winners 



Belchertown Carni Tomorrow 



Wednesday, June 27th, is 
perhaps the biggest day of the year 
for the residents. "CARNIVAL 
DAY" is held to get as many as 
possible out of the buildings and to 
participate in games, which are 
developed for their particular 
skills. In playing, they have a 
chance to win prizes which they 
look forward to receiving. A band 
will also be on hand for dancing, 
plus other entertainment. 



HELP IS NEEDED 

Volunteers are needed to take a 
child, or push a wheelchair patient 
from their building to the field and 
back. Also to help them play the 
games and select the prizes, and to 
see that they get their sodas, potato 
chips, popcorn, cotton candy, etc. 

If you are interested in helping 
us that day, please contact the 
Volunteer Department at 
Belchertown State School, Monday 
thru Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Telephone 323-6311. Please let us 
know as soon as possible, so plans 
can be made. Events will be held 
from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



YOU 

CAN'T MISS THIS 

ONE! 



THE POSEIDON AOVfflTVRE 



iROMLDNtMMm 

fMWBW COti* I* Mil*' 



m a ft m 

i-.t |>.-.| I "ID : «mo, S'f » | SMI 

..« -van iO«CN"Vl • "ONI L r«I1 WrOO**ll t'lVfNi | *•.(■>•. 




H 



:»€= 



=5€= 



=*T 






Amherst Film Coop 
Program 

Series - 



Summer 

- '2.25 



Ticket 



GOLD-DIGGERS 
OF '33 



JUNE 28 In CCA 
7:30 & 9:15 



Let's Make Love 
July 5 in SUB 

Fantastic Voyage 



Top Hat 
Aug. 2 in Mahar 

Forbidden Planet 



I Notices 



Tomorrow night at 7:30 and 9:15 
the Amherst Film Coop will get its 
summer program rolling with 
Busby Berkeley's classic Gold 
Diggers of 1933 starring Ruby 
Keeler and Dick Powell. The film 
will be shown in the Campus 
Center Auditorium Admission is 

75<f. 

*** 

Store hours at the Textbook 
Annex are 8:30-4:30 weekdays. 



TIMES - EVES. 7:00 & 9:00 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITtS ALL SEATS SI 00 



WINNER OF 1 
ACADEMY AWARDS! 



"BEATLES" 

Their First U.S. Concert 

1964 
plus 
Roadrunners Cartoons 

THURS., JUNE 28 

8 & 9:30 

MAHAR AUDITORIUM 



July 18 in CCA Aug. 9 in Mahar 

All At 7:30 and 9:30 





INCLUDING 

BEST SONG 




JOlh CENTURY FOX PRESENTS 

BOTCH CASSCDV AND' 
THE SUNDANCE KID 
Tonite 8 P.M. CC. Aud. FREE 

Paul Newman, Robert Redford. Katharine Ross. Newman (Butch) 
and Redford (Sundance) two extremely likable, amiable bank- 
train robbers who shy away from violence flee to excape a posse 
and the closing of the 1905 Western frontier. They pick up Ross, 
Sundance's school teacher mistress, and the trio sets forth on a 
memorable tour of nightlife in Manhattan before they sail for 
Bolivia to start life anew. Ross gives the men a crash course in 
conversational Spanish and they begin to rob banks and trains 
again. (They tried to go straight but it didn't pay off.) Some local 
bandidos play dirty, and since they are cornered, Butch is forced to 
kill for the first time. Dialogue is sharp; humor abundant and 
witty, photography is imaginative and Burt Bacharach's music 
memorable in this directional achievement by George Roy Hill. 




r— " — "■ 

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This coupon can lift you out of ordinary 

nursing and into . . . 

SUPEE.NURSING 

Fill in the coupon and mail it today. 
We'll send you a free, no-obligation, 
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about our special fringe benefits.) 

Fill in and mail to: 

Mrs. Alice Miller, RN, Director of Nursing 
Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 
19th & Lombard Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 19146 



Use This Form For 
CRIER CLASSIFIEDS 



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Rm. 402 Student Union 






Page * — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 




Minuteman Mercantile 

campus center 

serving the academic community with quality and value 



Summer Session 7973 

u Campus Center Store: M-F 8:30 - 4:30 ( 545-26 1 9) 

Hours: Textbook Anne* M-F 8:30 - 4:30 ( 545-2773) 

We will continue to carry items necessary for 

study such as books, notebooks, pencils, pens, etc. 

In addition, we also have many other items 

to fulfill your needs, some of which are . . . 



CALCULATORS j 

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FOR THE 
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We cany a full selection of headgear . . . 
the best deal in town on cigarette papers 
(most" brands - .20') 

and . • • 
A great selection of imported cigarettes 
from Belgium, Canada, England, France, 
India and the USSR. 





DON'T FORGET: THE BEST 

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ALSO: 

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Casual Clothing 

Typewriter Sales and Rentals 

Tennis Rackets & Balls, Golf Balls, 
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By MARTY KELLEY 

Amherst— Chequers is one of 
those quiet Italian bar and 
restaurants that wakes at 5 and 
closes with the morning's fog. 
She's pretty quiet in the summer 
which leads financiers to think it's 
a good thing that her sister is the 
highly patronized Pub in downtown 
Collegetown so the corporation 
continues to make money. Usually 
her clientele has money to spend, 
time to burn, and stories to tell . . . 
Come early July the bucks will be 
on the table and football will be in 
the air . . . The accent won't be 
Italian. 

Yes, for you hero worshipers, for 
vou who seek solace in someone 
else's accomplishments, find 
humor in front of a TV set, and 
wonder why Jim Nance isn't en- 
shrined somewhere, just relax . . . 
Those darlings of ineptness, those 
rebels of sport management, and 
tenants of Foxboro, will be here on 
campus in a couple of weeks. You 
have to blink twice to miss the New 
England Patriots. 

Believe it or not it was a har- 
mless air conditioner that decided 
whether the Pats would be here at 
Emerson House or at some 
castaway penthouse in Illinois used 
for decades by the St. Louis Car- 
dinals. 

The rationale for having one of 
pro football's merriest lot (Mazur 
wouldn't give Upton Bell a 
Christmas card) is pretty twofold. 
First, the facilities at 
Massachusetts are better than 
your average Yankee Conference 
backyard. The practice fields are 
many, and lighted as well. And for 
a scrimmage or two the Stadium 
stands the test. But it's torture for 
the onlookers who brave South 
Shore traffic to get here, drink at 
our bars, and get a precious first 
hand look at early October's . 
mistake. Three but of 14, No 
Mazur, and No Bell, leaves 
newcomer Chuck Fairbanks 
saving his reputation. 

Another reason for the Amherst 
tenure is of course— exposure. 
Although the toilets were the last to 
be righted at newly christened 
Foxboro, that won't be the, at- 
tendance deterrent this fall. It's 
tough to support a loser but the 
Pats at least have all New England 
to draw from. 

Yes, they come far and wide to 
catch the length of Steve Kiner's 
hair and the spunk of Bob 
Gladieux. Well both are gone as 
well as Mazur, Bell, and Carl 
Garrett, and Chuck Fairbanks, a 
master with the degrees at 
Oklahoma, now takes over Sunday 
school for New England. His job is 
not an envious one. The excedrin 
will be shipped in for Chuck along 
with the rookies numbering near 50 
on the 7th of July. The total circus 
list 90-100 but that drops with the 
temperature. 

So if you're bored from the 
frustrations of class and the lack of 
clean air, need a place to sip your 
cheap wine, or just are content to 
waste away a precious afternoon, 
take your troubles and your soul 
down to Alumni Stadium. The Pats 
should be there a couple of times a 
day at 10 and 3. And if you get off on 
scouts and has-beens, they'll be 
there too. 

Slowly becoming your everyday 
has-been could very well be none 
other than the franchise of three 
years hence James Plunkett. Out 
of Stanford, successfully through 
the Rose Bowl, and into a Patriot 
uniform is a solid two out of three. 
To be in Foxboro without an of- 
fensive line is a stint in purgatory. 
But Jimmy will eventually suffer 
along with the likes of Josh Aston, 
John Tarver, Reggie Rucker, and 
Tommy Reynolds. They're young. 
But that's not their stigma ... A 
Patriot uniform might be. 

Neither a Fairbanks nor a Bill 
Nelson (new QB coach) nor a 
superb Vataha will save the 
Foxboro Follies of '73. The good 
Lord may give them a half dozen 
wins if they devout the other half of 
Sunday to him. An offensive line 
like a good wine needs aging. The 
Pats have no such stock or such 
management to boot or produce in 
the next five years. Then Jim 
Plunkett could earn his wage and 
his reputation. But for now only 
Chequers will make the bread . . . 



Patriots Come to Amherst 



I 

The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page 7 



By MIKE BROPHY 

After all the uproar about where 
New England's only pro football 
team was going to train this 
summer had settled down, they 
came back... and the area people 
are glad they did. The team will be 
reporting as a complete unit for the 
first day of practice on July 12. 

The rookies will report to the 
team headquarters in Emmerson 
House on July 7 for physicals and 
basic orientation to football life in 
general. They will run through 
three days of practice prior to the 
arrival of the veterans of last 
year's less than satisfactory 3-11 
season. 

In the years past the team has 
been housed in James House but 
when Chuck Fairbanks was signed 
as the new Head Coach and 
General Manager, he decided he 



wanted to house the team in the 
Campus Center. At one point the 
University was ready to sign the 
lease but the next day did not see 
the sun rise as UMass had backed 
down. 



Fairbanks then took his team 
and looked elsewhere for a training 
location. Finally, after long 
meetings and conferences the two 
parties reached an agreement that 
will house the team in Emmerson 
while Fairbanks' offices will be in 
a second building. 

The team will be fed in one of the 
three commons atop the horseshoe 
during their four week stay at 
UMass before moving back to 
Foxboro from where the team will 
make final preparations for their 
1973 journey to a division title. 



The Pats will break camp at 
UMass on August 4 when they will 
return to prepare for their pre- 
season match with the Pakland 
Raiders in Schaefer Stadium on 
August 5. They will play the San 
Francisco 49er's in the Annual Hall 



of Fame Game in Canton, Ohio on 
August 28 immediately after the 
College All-Star game that is 
scheduled for Friday August 27 as 
the All-stars play the undefeated 
and World Champion Miami 
Dolphins. 



Crossword Puzzle 



An«wef to Yesterday's Puzzte 




Where Silvio and His Staff will get your hair 
ready for summer. 

26 Main St., Amherst 253-9293 



ACROSS 

1 Glisten 

6 Savory 

1 1 Declares 

12 StarinDra- 

conis 

14 Make lace 

15 Begin 

17 Greek letter 

18 Negative prefix 

19 Place for com- 

bat 

21 Gmdosiow 
note 

22 Roman tyrant 

24 Pedal digit 

25 Bacteriologists 

wire 
27 Three-base hit 
29 Breed of dog 

31 Imitate 

32 Music: as writ- 

ten 

33 Small and trim 
36 Rocks 

39 Island off Ire- 

land 

40 Small rug 

42 Comfort 

43 Sun god 

44 Small minnows 

47 Hebrew letter" 

48 Compass point 

50 Name 

51 Ventilate 

52 Weirder 
54 Encomiums 

56 Thick 

57 Church council 

DOWN 

1 More vapid 

2 Chapeau 

3 Pronoun 

4 Bird s home 



5 Landed proper- 

ty 

6 Set 

7 Aleutian island 

8 Parent (colloq.) 

9 Demon 

10 Cessation of 

practice 

1 1 Chore 

13 Potassium 

nitrate 
16 Fuss 

19 Soaking wet 

20 Slogans 
23 Lasso 

26 Babylonian 

hero 
28 Permit 
30 Superlative 

ending 
33 Analyze, as 

sentence 




34 Wiped out 

35 Domain 

36 Steps over 

fence 

37 Discovered 

38 Prophets 
41 Likelv 



45 Southwestern 

Indians 

46 Slippery 
49 Before 

51 Time gone by 
53 Preposition 
55 Preposition 





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2 


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4 


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6 


7 


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I lint r. Ii\ t'ttiUMl KVaturf Syndicate, Inc. 



t<o 




Page 8 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



SUMMER A CTIVITIES ' 73 



On Campus • Plays and 



June 26 Film: BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE 
SUNDANCE KID. Paul Newman, Robert 
Redford and Katherine Ross star in the ad- 
ventures of two likable train robbers at the 
turn of the century. 8:00 p.m, CCA,* 

June 24 July S Art Exhibit: THE FAMILY, 
consisting of architects, painters and print- 
makers who produce items outside of each 
artists normal field. SU Art Gallery, open to 
the public, hours to be announced. 

June 27 Music Hour: TANNER, TANNER 
AND CHESNUT, music for flute, horn and 
percussion 12:00 noon, CC Concourse. 

June 27 Magic: C. SHAW SMITH, 

MAGICIAN, a show that will prove that the 
hand is quicker than the eye. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 2 Film: FALL OF THE HOUSE OF 
USHER, two masters of horror, Vincent Price 
and Edgar Allan Poe are combined in this 
thriller. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 5 Dance: GEORGE FAISON 

UNIVERSAL DANCE EXPERIENCE, 
building a repertoire on the concept that ar 
fistic excellence and originality in dance can 
be used for social and educational purposes. 
8:00 p.m., Bowker Auditorium, ** 

July 10 & 11 Art Sale: FERDINAND ' 
ROTEN GALLERIES, prints, lithographs, and 
posters. 11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m., CC Concourse 
July 10 Film: CROMWELL (and THE 
GREAT MCGONICLE), Richard Harris and 
Alec Giuness depict the personal conflict 
between the two great figures of the English 
Civil War. THE GREAT MCGONICLE stars 
W.C. Fields. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July n-20 Art Exhibit: THE BLACK 
WOMAN AS PHOTOGRAPHER, five black 
women from New York City display over fifty 
photographs. SU Gallery, open to the public, 
hours to be announced. 

July 11 Jazi Concert: CARLOS GARRETT 
& THE UNIVERSAL BLACK FORCE, 7 p.m. 
July 12 - Music Hour: Joseph Payne, harp 
sichordist. a brillant young artist from boston 
will be performing works by Bach, Scarlatti 
and D'Angletoert. 12:00 Noon, CC Concourse. 
On the evening of July 12. Mr. Payne will be 
performing a concert in Bowker Auditorium, 
8:00 p.m., •• 

July 17-20 Cabaret. A COLE PORTER 
REVIEW The masque ensemble will present 
an evening of song and dance to the witty and 
sophisticated music of Cole Porter. 8:00 p.m.. 
Top of the Campus Restaurant, Campus 
Center. 

July 17 Film: ANNE OF THE THOUSAND 
DAYS, The most crucial point in the life of 
Henry VIII, his courtship and marriage to 
Anne Boleyn is portrayed. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 18 Music Hour: CHUCK HALBERG 
AND CRAIG MANNING, folk music, 12:00 
noon, CC Concourse 

July IS Fun: BUFFALO BOB SMITH'S 
HOWDY DOODY REVIVAL, Complete with 
Peanut Gallery Buffalo Bob returns to remind 
everyone of the days of Clarabell, Dili y Dally 
et al. 8:00 p.m., SUB, * 

July 23 Lecture. HEYWOOD HALE 
BROUN, The noted CBS sports and newscaster 
best known for publicizing the sometimes 
forgotten and the unusual with a li'l bit of 
humor. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 24 Film: COOL HAND LUKE, A harsh 
southern prison Is the setting for this drama 
starring Paul Newman and Arthur Kennedy. 
8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 25- August 3 - Art Exhibit: CARTOONS 
BY STAN HUNT; Sports cartoonist for the 
Springfield Union, some of these cartoons will 
feature UMASS sports events. SU Gallery, 
open to the public, hours to be announced. 

July 25 Music Hour: JAZZ JAM, artists to 
be announced. 12:00 noon, CC Concourse 

July 24 - Concert: PRESERVATION HALL 
JAZZ BAND, For the seventh consecutive 
year, The Jazz Band returns 7:00p.m., Haigis 
Mall (SUB rain location),* 

July 27-2* - Theatre: BELL, BOOK AND 
CANDLE; The Masque Ensemble will be 
performing In an enchanting modern comedy 
of witches and warlocks by the Pulitzer Prize 
winning John Van Druten. 8:00 p.m., Bowker 
Auditorium, *• 

July 30 - Films: THE GENERAL and 
BLOOD AND SAND, If you can remember 
these films you are giving your age away 
because these art silent film classics with 
Buster Keaton and Rudolf Valentino. 8:00 
p.m., CCA,* 



August 1 Rainbow Festival: A wide variety 
of events and displays will be featured in this 
festival that will present a spectrum of music, 
film, dance, poetry, art exhibits and craft 
demonstrations. Concert: JOHN HARTFORD, 
MATTHEW AND PETER, BILL STAINES, 
Folk Singers, Folk-rock. 6:30 p.m., 
Metawampee Lawn (rain SUB),* 

August 3-5 BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE, 
see July 27. 

August 7 - Film: CAPTAIN HORATION 
HORNBLOWER, Gregory Peck as the Captain 
and Virginia Mayo star in the adventure story 
about the commander of the British Ship 
during the Napoleonic War. 

August 8 Music Hour: VEDA ZUPONCIC, 
pianist. 12:00 noon, CC Concourse. On the 
evening of August 8, Ms. Zuponcic will be 
performing works by Beethoven, Lizst, Rach- 
maninoff and Ravel. 8:00 p.m., Bowker, 
Auditorium, •* 

August 9 Dance: University Dancers, under 
the direction of Ms. Marilyn Patton, the 
University Dancers will perform modern 
dances set to the music of Bach; Emerson, 
Lake and Palmer, and Vivaldi. 8:00 p.m., 
Bowker Auditorium, •* 



Key to Code: 

CCA Campus Center Auditorium 

SUB Student Union Ballroom 

SU Student Union 

CC Campus Center 

* Free, public on a seats available basis 

•• Tickets by ID for UMass Summer 
Students, others Si. SO, reserved seating 



Musicals 

ARENA CIVIC THEATRE (At the Roun- 

dhouse, Franklin County Fairgrounds, 

Greenfield) 

YOU'RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN, 

June I!. 22, 23, 28, 29; 

BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE, July 5, 6, 7, 12, 

13, 14. 

AH, WILDERNESS, by Eugene O'Neill, July 

19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28. 

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, by Ten 

nessee Williams, Aug. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

A musical, to be announced, Aug. 9, 10, 11, 16, 

17, 18. 

Curtain time 8:30, house open at 8. Box office 

open June 15. For tickets write Arena Civic 

Theatre, P. O. Box 744, Greenfield, Mass. 

01301, or call 773 7991. 

COMMUNITY MUSICAL '73 BABES IN 

TOY LAND, by Victor Herbert, presented by 

the elementary-junior high division on Aug. 3, 

4, 5 at ARJHS Aud. PROMISES, PROMISES, 

by Simon, Bacharach and David, presented by 

the senior division on Aug. 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18 

at ARHS Aud. Tickets at door or make 

reservations: P.O. Box 349, Amherst 01002. 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE SUMMER 

THEATRE (So. Hadley) For tickets and in 

formation, 538-2406: 

ANDROCLES AND THE LION (Children's 

production in the Amphitheatre at 10:30 a.m.) 

June 26, 27, 28, 29, 30. 

PLAY IT AGAIN SAM, July 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Curtain 

at 8:30. 

REDAY WHEN YOU ARE, C.B., July 10, 11, 

12, 13, 14. Curtain at 8:30. 

BLITHE SPIRIT, July 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. Curtain 

at 8:30. 

BUS STOP, July 2428, Curtain at 8:30. 

POOR RICHARD, July 31-Aug. 4. Curtain at 

8:30. 

A THOUSAND CLOWNS, Aug. 711, Curtain at 

8:30. 

AS YOU LIKE IT, Aug. 1418, Curtain at 8:30 

STORROWTON THEATRE (Eastern States 

Exposition Park, West Springfield, Mass. 

01089) THE JOEY HEATHERTON SHOW with 

Pat Henry, June 18. 

APPLAUSE, with Arlene Dahl, June 25. 

THIS WAS BURLESQUE, with Ann Corio, 

July 2. 

PROMISES, PROMISES, with Frank Gorshin, 

July 9 (matinee) 

MY FAIR LADY, with Jane Powell, July 16 

(matinee) 

AN EVENING WITH AL MARTINO AND PAT 

COOPER, July 23. 

FOLLIES with Vivian Blaine, Robert Alda, 

Lynn Bari, Selma Diamond, July 30. 

THE SERGIO FRANCHI SHOW, with Corbett 

Monica and Dana Valery, Aug. 6 

UNTAMED LAND, with Ernest Borgnine, 

jimmie Rodgers, Aug. 13. 

THE LIBERACE SHOW, Aug. 20. 

THE UNSINKABLE MOLLY BROWN, with 

Howard Keel, Tammy Grimes, Aug. 27. 

THE EDMCMAHON SHOW, with Mimi Hints, 

Sept. 5-9. 

Box office hours daily 10-10, Sun. 1-5. Phone 

732 1101. 

UMASS — THE PROVINCETOWN COM- 
PANY TWELFTH NIGHT, by William 
Shakespeare July 5. 

JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE AND WELL AND 
LIVING IN PARIS — July 6. 
A MOON FOR THE MISBEGOTTEN, by 
Eugene O'Neill - July 7 
All performances in Bartlett Auditorium, 
UMass at 8:30 p.m. Tickets and Information, 
5452579. 

WILLIAMSTOWN SUMMER THEATRE 

(Williamstown. Mass.) Season July 5 Sept 1. 

SAINT JOAN, by George Bernard Shaw, 
July 5 July 14. Remainder of season to be 
chosen from the following: The Seagull 
(Chekhov), The Misanthrope (Mollere), 
Galileo (Brecht), Sweet Bird of Youth 
(Williams), The Master Builder (Ibsen), The 
Second Man (an original musical version of 
The Importance of Being Ernest, by Terence 
McNally.) 

Opening night, July 5 is a Gala Benefit with 
champagne, black tie and after show party. 
Audiences invited to become Friends, Patrons, 
Tickets and information: 458-8146. 

WILLISTON SUMMER THEATRE, Willlston- 
Northampton School, Easthampton. For 
tickets, dates and other information call 1-527- 
4954). Three productions between June 25 and 
August 6. STORY THEATRE, by Paul Sills, 
BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE, by Leonard 
Gershe, and THE MATCHMAKER, by 
Thornton Wilder. Ellis B. Baker, Director. 
Classes and workshops in acting, stagecraft, 
lighting, costumes, playwritlng, etc. 



Music 



MOHAWK TRAIL CONCERTS INC. (at the 
Federated Church on Rte. 2, Charlemont) 
Director, Arnold Black Informal concerts of 
music old and new, Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. 

July 21 - Mozart, Pergoiesi and Schumann, 
performed by Yanaglta, Bogin, Vardi and 
Johns. 

July 28 - A Kaleidoscope of American Music, 
performed by Healy, Rifkin and the Can- 
terbury Players. 

August 4 Brahms, Scarlatti and Pureed, 
performed by Westenberg, Berinbaum and G. 
D Armand. 

August 11 A Rachmaninoff Retrospective, 
performed by Mannes, J. D'Armand and 
Forbes. 

August IS Pureed, Brahms, Schutz and 
Hindemith, performed by the Central 
Presbyterian Chamber Singers. 

August 25 Schubert, Vaughan Williams, 
Chausson, performed by Eaton, Stelnhardt 
and Humphrey. 

OTHER EVENTS: July 29 at 3:30 p.m. ■ 
Deadly Nighshade. August 5 at 3 30 p.m. ■ Nina 
Dova. August 19 at 8:30 p.m. - Molly Scott and 
Harrison Parker. October 6 and II at 8:30 p.m. 



Music for Fall Foliage performed by 
DeGaetani, West, Naegele and the New York 
Camerata. Information and reservations: 
Mohawk Trail Concerts, Inc., P.O. Box 2, 
Charlemont, Mass. 01339 or phone 625 2566 or 
3396674. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN CONCERTS, South 
Mountain Association, Box 23, Pittsfield, 
Mass 01201. (One mile south of Pittsfield, on 
Rtes. 7 and 20) 
July 28 at 3 p.m . Tokyo String Quartet 
August is at 3 p.m. Ruth and Jaime Laredo, 
pianist and violinist, in a sonata recital. 
Sept. 23 Beaux Arts Trio of New York. 
October 27 at 8 p.m. - The Barber of Seville, 
performed by the Metropolitan Opera Studio. 
Place to be announced later. Tickets and in- 
formation, phone 443-6517 or 442-0130. 
TANGLEWOOD — BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
CONCERTS (Lenox, Mass. 01240) Included 
Berkshire Festival, Berkshire Music Center, 
Music Center Orchestra, Festival of Con- 
temporary Music, and Tanglewood grounds 
with cafeteria. 

July 6 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude: Larry 
Smith. 9 p.m. Seiji Ozawa conducts Bach's 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 and Concerto for 
Two Violins, other Bach. 

July 7 1030 a.m.. Open Rehearsal, 8:30 
p.m., Mozart Program, Stanislaw Skrowac- 
zewski conducting. 

July 8 2:30 p.m. Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Haydn, with Tanglewood Festival Chorus and 
soloists. 

July 13 - 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude with 
Malcolm Frager. 9 p.m., Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Mozart. July 14, 10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal, 
8:30 p.m., Riccardo Muti conducts Vivaldi, 
Mozart. Andre Watts in Mozart and Rossini. 
July 15 at 2:30 p.m., Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Handel, Haydn, and Mozart. 

July 20 at 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude with 
Andre Watts. 9 p.m., Eugene Ormandy con 
ducts Beethoven Program. 

July 21 at 10:30 a.m., Open Rehearsal. 8:30 
p.m., Eugene Ormandy conducts Beethoven 
Program, with Tanglewood Festival Chorus. 
July 22 at 2:30 p.m., Stanislaw Skrowac 
zewski conducts Beethoven Program with 
Sidney Harth, violinist. 

July 27 at 7 p.m., Weekend Prelude with 
Peter Lagger. 9 p.m., William Steinberg 
conducts Brahms Program, Miriam Fried, 
violinist. 

July 28 at 10:30 c ., Open Rehearsal, 8:30 
p.m., William Steinberg conducts Schubert 
and Mahler. James King, soloist. 

July 29 at 2:30 p.m. - Rafael Fruhbeck de 
Burgos conducts Beethoven Program with 
Christoph Eschenbach. 

August 3 at 7 p.m. - Weekend Prelude with 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus. 9 p.m., Michael 
Tilson Thomas conducts Beethoven and 
Copland. 

August 4 at 10:30 a.m.. Open Rehearsal. 8:30 
p.m., Michael Tilson Thomas conducts 
Stravinsky Program. With Tanglewood 
Festival Chorus. 

August 5 at 2:30 p.m. - Michael Tilson 
Thomas conducts Mozart, Cage, Strauss. 
Brahms, with Malcolm Frager. 

August 10 at 7 p.m. - Weekend Prelude with 
Phyllis Curtin and Ryan Edwards with Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players. 9 p.m., Colin 
Davis conducts Mozart Program, with 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus. 

August 11 at 10:30 a.m., Open Rehearsal, 
8:30 p.m., Colin David conducts Berlioz, 
Haydn and Brahms. 

August 12 at 2:30p.m., Colin Davis conducts 
Handel's Messiah, with Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus. 

August 17 at 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude with 
Earl Wild. 9 p.m.. Lawrence Foster conducts 
Berlioz, Bruch and Proxofieff. 

August IS at 10:30 a.m., Open Rehearsal. 
8:30 p.m., Arthur Fiedler conducts Dvorak, 
Rachmaninoff, with Earl Wild. 

August 19 at 2:30 p.m., Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Franck, Liszt, with Andre Watts. 

August 24 at 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude, 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players. 9 p.m., 
Seiji Ozawa conducts Berlioz, with 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus. 

August 25 at 10:30 a.m., Open Rehearsal. 
8:30 p.m., James De Priest conducts Rach- 
maninoff, Shostakovich, with Byron Janis. 

August 26at2:30p.m. - Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Verdi, with Tanglewood Festival Chorus. 

Tickets a*nd information: Festival Ticket 
Office, Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass. 01240, phone 
637 1600. 

DRUM AND BUOLE CORPS Super Bowl Of 
Music, Second Annual Competition of In- 
ternational Championship Sponsored by 
Belchertown State School Friends Association. 
Saturday, August 18 at 7:30 p.m. UMass 
Alumni Satdium. Reservations: George E. 
Como, 229 Whltmore Administration Building, 
UMass, Amherst 01002, phone 545 2354. (Rain 
date, August 19 at 1:30 p.m. If it rains on the 
19th competition will be held indoors at 1:30 
p.m.) 

PIONEER VALLEY ASSN. EVENTS (at 
locations shown below.) 
For further information, call 586-0321. (Ab 
breviation ESE indicates Eastern States 
Exposition Fairgrounds, West Springfield.) 

JUNE 29 JULY 1: ARABIAN HORSE 
SHOW, ESE. 

JULY 18: DEERFIELD TER- 
CENTENARY WEEK, Deerfleid and So. 
Deerfield. Includes Deerfleid Valley Art Show. 

JULY I: WEST SPRINGFIELD LIONS 
CLUB CIRCUS, ESE. 

JULY 12: HOLYOKE KENNEL CLUB DOG 
SHOW. Tn County Fairgrounds, Nor- 
thampton. 

JULY 14: ANNUAL OUTDOOR ART SHOW. 
The Green, Eestfield. 

JULY 19-22: APPALOOSA HORSE SHOW, 
ESE. 

JULY 21: HAMPSHIRE COUNTY 4-H 
HORSE SHOW, Trl County Falrgounds, 



AUGUST 1012: MIDDLEFIELD FAIR, 
Middlefield. 

AUGUST 1112: NEW ENGLAND QUAR 
TER HORSE SHOW, ESE. 

AUGUST 11 12: TEN MAN STAR 
PARACHUTE MEET, Orange Airport, 
Orange. 

AUGUST 17 19: WESTFIELD FAIR, 
Westfield. 

AUGUST 17 21: HARAMBEE HOLIDAY, 
INC. Deberry Playground, Monroe St. and 
Eastern Ave., Springfield. 

AUGUST 24-26: CUMMINGTON FAIR, 
Cummington. 



Dance 



JACOB'S PILLOW DANCE FESTIVAL (in 

Becket, take Mass Pike to Lee-Pittsfield exit, 
turn on US Rte. 20 towards Springfield. Eight 
miles to George Carter Rd., turn left 7 lOths 
mile.) 

For subscription and single ticket In- 
formation, write Jacob's Pillow Dance 
Festival, Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238. Season 
tickets available. 

Walter Terry, Acting Director. Ballet 
classes under Maria Tallchief, Klrsten Ralov, 
Fred Biornsson, Gabi Taub-Darvash, Michael 
Uthoff, Edna McRae, Madeline Culpo. Also 
modern dance classes. 

Performances Tues. at 7:30, Wed., Fri., Sat. 
at 8:40, Thurs. and Sat. matinees at 3 p.m. No 
Thurs. eve performances. 

July 3-7: Gala Opening - Margot Fonteyn and 
the Rosario Galan Ballet Espanol. July 10-14: 
Hartford Ballet with Lisa Bradley and Michael 
Uthoff. July 17 21: Twyla Thap Company and 
Ballet Brio. July 24-28: National Ballet in "The 
Story of Cinderella." July 31 Aug 4: 
Jacqueline Rayet, Roni Mahler, Paul Russell, 
Jane Kosminsky, Bruce Becker, Melissa 
Hayden and Peter Martins in Pas de Deux 
program. Aug. 7-11 : Carmen De Lavallade and 
company in Gogol's "The Overcoat." Aug. 14- 
18: Marcia Haydee and Richard Cragun and 
Cincinnati Ballet Compnay. Aug. 21-25: 
Cynthia Gregory and Terry Orr with dancers 
of American Theatre. Aug. 28 Sept 1st: 
Eleanor D'Antuono and Ivan Nagy, with 
Harkness Ballet. 



Film Series 



Charlemont 

CHARLEMONT FILM STUDY SERIES, Tues. 

and Thurs. eves. 7 p.m. Discussion and 

analysis after screening of 14 major films and 

several shorts. Refreshments. Credit possible 

through UMass Division of Continuing 

Education Information and registration: 

Conny Hazlett, Branswallow, Charlemont, 

Mass. 01339, phone 339 4288. 

Northampton 

FORBES FILM FESTIVAL (20 West St., near 

main gate of Smith College) 

June 20 Art of the Film: BABBAGE, by 

Charles Eames; THE LITTLE ISLAND, by 

Richard Williams; H20, by Ralph Steiner; and 

FREE FALL, By Arthur Lipsett. 

June 27 - Old and New in Cinema; THE 

CHAMPION, with Charlie Chaplin, 

REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST: 

DEDICATED TO PROUST, by Harry 

Weisburd. 

July 11 - Recognition of America: THE 

FLIGHT OF APOLLO 11, documentary; A 

PHOTO CONCERT, by Jeff Bubar. 

July 18 Classic Comedies: COLLEGE, with 

Buster Keaton. 

July 25 • Art of the Film: MOSAIC, SPIRAL 

JETTY, SYMMETRY, and POWERS OF 

TEN. 

Aug. 1 - Film Classic: SON OF THE SHIEK, 

with Rudolph Valentino. 

Aug. 8 - Early American and French Cinema: 

A NIGHT AT THE SHOW, with Charlie 

Chaplin; and THE CRAZY RAY, by Rene 

Clair. 

Aug. IS Old and New in Cinema: THE 

FLOORWALKER, with Charlie Chaplin. Plus 

shorts, CLAY, ORIGIN OF SPECIES. 

Aug. 22 THE BANK, with Charlie Chaplin, 

THE SOLE MEN 

Aug. 29 Film Classic: SPIES, by Fritz Lang. 



Northampton. 

JULY 22 29: EASTERN NATIONAL 
MORGAN HORSE SHOW, Tri County 
Fairgrounds, Northampton. 

JULY 28: HAMPDEN COUNTY 4-H FAIR 
AND HORSE SHOW, ESE. 

AUGUST 3-5: LITTLEVILLE FAIR, Lit- 
tleville. 



Lectures and 
Workshops 



NEW ENGLAND CENTER (Box 575, 
Amherst, Mass. 01002) (Phone: 549 0886) 
Innovation in Family Process: A Professional 
Workshop, June 22-24. 

Explorations in Humanistic Education, June 
24-29 and July 9 13. 

in Search of Self: A Gestalt Workshop, June 29- 
July 1 and July 1315. 
A Weekend Yoga Intensive, July 6-8. 
Intensive Summer Gestalt Communities, July 
16-27, July 30 Aug. 10, Aug. 13-24. 
An Introduction to Arica Training, July 21-22 
and Aug. 11 12. 

Transactional Analysis Marathon, July 21-22 
Rediscovery of the Body, July 27-29 
Bio- Energetics and Response: Toward Af- 
firmation of Aliveness, Aug. 3-5. 
Transpersonal Tori Workshop, Aug. 3-5 
Exploring Ourselves in Relationships: A 
Gestalt Workshop, Aug. 1012 
Expanding Human Consciousness: An In- 
tensive Workshop, Aug. 13-31 
Awareness, Meditation and Play, Sept. 5-9 
Centering through Hypnosis and 
Psyrhodrama, Sept. 7-9. 
Gestalt Approach to Art Therapy and 
Creativity, Sept. 15-16. 

NEW ENGLAND WEAVER'S SEMINAR, 10th 
biennial. July 9-13, UMass, Amherst. Mary 
Snyder, featured workshop lecturer. Campus 
Center. Dorm space and meals available. 
Register by June 25 and Conference Center, 



UMass, Amherst, 01002. Further information: 
Lydia Elia, Forest Park Station, Box 437, 
Springfield, Mass. 01108. 

HUMANIZING SEX AND SEXUALITY 
EDUCATION, Center for Human Sexual 
Concerns. June 25 28. Workshop at UMass, 
Amherst. Information and registration: Dr. 
Howard E. Munson, Baptist Hill Rd., Conway, 
Mass. 01341, phone 369 4652. 

FOCUS: OUTDOORS, presented by Arcadia 
Wildlife Sanctuary and the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society. Aug. 3, 4, 5 at Mount Holyoke 
College, South Hadley, Mass. Oudoor ad- 
venture weekend for the whole family in- 
cluding field trips, Nature College, exhibits, 
speakers, canoeing, etc. Information and 
registration. FOCI'S: OUTDOORS, Arcadia, 
Easthampton, Mass. 01027. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORKSHOPS, Mass. 4-H 
Youth Center, Ashland, "Youth in Action" will 
deal with the political process in government, 
plus youth in the environment. 15-19 year olds - 
July 6 7, July 27 28 and Aug. 10-12. 1214 year 
olds July 13-14, July 20-21, and Aug. 24-25. Fee 
covers meals and lodging. Information: Susan 
J. Uhlinger, Mass. 4-H Youth Center, 466 
Chestnut St., Ashland 01721. 



Arts and 
Crafts 



Amherst 

OPTIK GALLERY 949 S. Pleasant St., over 
Hastings Store) By appt. only until Sept. 4, 
then Tues., Fri. noon-5 and Sat. 10-5. Primarily 
graphics, including work of Wang Hui-Ming, 
Jack Coughlin, Barry Moser, Leonel Gongora, 
Vita Giorgi, Thomas Cornell, Edward Hill, 
William Patterson, Scott Prior, Peter Milton, 
Robert Marx and Jacques Hnizdovsky. (253- 
5601 or 253-9410). 

Haydenville 

TOMORROW'S TRADITIONS (Rte. 9 about 

si>: miles north of Northampton) New England 

craftsmen working, exhibiting, and sailing in 

old Hayden Gere Brass Works building. (564- 

1196). 

Holyoke 

HOLYOKE MUSEUM OF NATURAL 
HISTORY AND ART WISTARIAHURST (238 
Cabot St.) Closed in July. Otherwise Mon. Sat. 
1-5; Sun. 2-5. Conemporary painting and 
Sculpture, Chippendale Room, 19th century 
Art Room, Connecticut Valley Room, 
historical diorama, and North American In- 
dian Hall in Youth Museum. Guided tours. 
(536-6771). 

Leverett 

LEVERETT CRAFTSMEN AND ARTISTS 

(town center) Exhibitions of art works and 
creative crafts. Intensive summer class 
program for beginners and advanced students 
In ceramic, weaving, stained glass, silver- 
work, enamelling, casting, painting, lapidary. 
Craftsmen work in open studios dally in above 
fields, and blacksmithing, copper, and 
stringed instrument making. Salesroom and 
gallery open daily 15. (253-9062.) 

Northampton 

SMITH COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART (Route 
9) French Impressionists, Dutch and English 
landscapes, 18th century French and Italian 
paintings, American painting representing the 
entire development of art In the U.S. Open 
during academic year only; In summer by 
appt. only (584 2700 ext. 236). 

Springfield 

GEORGE WALTER VINCENT SMITH ART 
MUSEUM 222 State St. in library and 
museums guadrangle. Chinese enamels, 
jades, potteries, porcelains, Japanese 
lacquers. 19th century American paintings, 
mss, Roman glass, Japanese and European 
arms, armor, furniture, Ivories. Monthly loan 
exhibitions, library, lectures, films. Tues. -Sat. 
1-5; Sun. 2-5. Closed Sun. during July, Aug., 
holidays. (733 4214). 

MUSEUM OF FIN ARTS across from library 
and Museums quad, 49 Chestnut St. 17th 
century Dutch, 18th century Italian, 18th and 
19th century French painting. Sculpture, 
tapestries, armor, ceramics, furniture, Gothic 
and Renaissance works, Oriental art. 
TUES.— Sat. 1-5; Sun. 2-5 Closed Mon. Closed 
Sun. in July (733-5857.) 

Stockbritfge 

CHESTER WOOD off Rte 183. Studio of Daniel 
Chester French, sculptor of the seated Lincoln 
in Washington, D.C., and the Minute Man In 
Concord, Mass. Barn gallery, sculpture, 
paintings, garden, nature trails, June Sept. 
daily 10 5, Tues. and Thurs. eves, in July and 
Aug. National and Mass. Historic Landmark. 

Williamstown 

STERLINO AND FRANCINE CLARK ART 
INSTITUTE South St. Italian, Flemish and 
Dutch paintings of the 14th- 18th century, 
French Impressionists Degas, Monet, 
RENOIR, Toulouse-Lautrec. Eng. and 
American silver. Old Masters, sculpture. 
Tues. Sun and holidays, 10-5. Closed Mon. 
Guided tours In July and Aug. at 3. Tues Fri 
Summer exhibit: American landscape pain- 
tings from the Metropolitan Museum. (458- 
8109). 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART In 
Lawrence Hall, Main St. American antique 
furniture, British and American portraits of 
the 16th and 19th centuries, Spanish painting 
from 15th to 16th century. American painting 
and sculpture. Ancient, Medieval, Pre- 
Columbian, Renaissance, Baroque, Far 
Eastern, African and 19th and 20th century art. 
Generally open in summer recess, If closed 
apply to the college guide. (597-2429). 



\ 




June 28, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 2 




"The Aggie men all played a clean, gentlemanly game throughout, though often receiving severe 
provocation did not resort to slugging." November 1894. 

A Century Ago . . . 



By CINDY GONET 

In these days of inflation, rising 
food costs, housing costs, and 
tuition hikes, it's nice to look back 
at the golden olden days of sunny 
skies and whispering breezes. 

A century ago at UMass. . .those 
were the days when everyone knew 
his neighbor, people smiled, 
worked, and wanted to become 
farmers. 

Mass Aggie, as it was known in 
1867, had a freshman class of 47. 
There were 6 faculty members and 
the only major department of 
study was agriculture. 

As the index. of 1892 explains, 
"Massachusetts Agricultural 
College is a rare chance for young 
men to obtain a thorough practical 
education. The cost is reduced to a 
minimum." Tuition was $12 a 
term. Room rent $5 per term. 
Board was $3-$3.50 per week. 

Candidates for admission had to 
be fifteen years of age or over, and 
pass satisfactory oral and written 
examinations in English Gram- 
mar, Geography, History of the 
United States, Arithmetic, Algebra 
to Quadratic Equations, and the 
Metric System. 



Those were the days when 
apathy was a sin. . .everyone had 
an opinion, voiced it, belonged and 
interacted. 

Participation in class events was 
almost mandatory. The class yell 
of '94 was. . . "Rah-Rix-Rah, Zip- 
Boom-Bah, '94-94-Rah-Rah-Rah". 
Every class composed it's own 
yell; it was symbolic of unity. 

AGGIE LIFE The predecessor of 
the COLLEGIAN, often related 
this feeling of kindred spirits. "On 
September 23 Professor Maynard 
took the Sophomore class on a 
botanizing trip to Sugar-Loaf. They 
ascended the mountain, viewed the 
beautiful scenery for which the 
place is noted, and after an hour 
had been thus occupied, they 
descended. Some of them finding 
quite rare botanical gems. About 2 
p.m. the boys started on their 
homeward journey when Professor 
Maynard showed his usual 
generosity by giving all the 
watermelons and mushmelons 
they were capable of eating, which 
proved to be a large amount in 
most cases. About 4 p.m., they 
arrived at the college and after 



On the Inside : 

Attorney for Students 

see page two 

Crier Quiz 

see page two 

Wounded Knee 

see page four 



giving the class yell several times, 
and extending to Professor 
Maynard a vote of thanks; they 
went to their rooms all agreeing 
that they had spend a most 
profitable and enjoyable day." 

It seems that times have 
changed. This letter of a Freshman 
writing to his mother was con- 
fiscated by a Sophomore and 
printed in AGGIE LIFE, October 
1890. "We must keep regular hours 
as we must have our lights out by 
9.00. My clock stopped and the next 
thing I knew I heard the janitor yell 
"lights out". I blew mine out, then 
I went to bed in the dark. 

"Now I go to bed about half-past- 
eight. I am too sleepy to sit up and 
study. 

"The Sophomores are very 
rough. . .1 am going to keep in my 
room nights because the 
Sophomores say they will throw me 
in the fountain." 

Actually, it sounds like 
something I wrote as a Freshman 
to my sympathetic mother. 

Perhaps aside from rising and 
falling standards of living, people 
will be the same. We still complain 
about identical things, although a 
century apart. . . "Are the walks 
around college to be as slippery 
next term as they were this winter. 
So little labor would be required to 
remove all the snow and ice from 
the walks." AGGIE LIFE in the 
1800's grumbled and griped about 
matters with which 1970's UMies 
are still hasseling. 

The college had progressed into 
a university, and as the AGGIE 
proclaimed 100 years ago "When 
an alumnus of one of the 1st classes 
returns to the college, after years 
of absence, he hardly knows the 
place." 

In the next hundred years, who 
knows? 



For You New People 

Here's Amherst 

-and the rest of the area 

By CINDY GONET 

For the newly mistaken and newly arrived in Amherst, here's a brief 
overview of the place and what it has to offer. 

Amherst is, in effect, something that complements the University. It 
has a lot of tradition, old ivy covered buildings, Emily Dickinson's grave, 
nostalgia and people. People with new, different, and strange ideas at 
times. People with a sense of humor, fatalists, and freaks. You can grow 
to love it, hate it, tolerate it, or accept it. 

UMass won't exactly be a city this summer, but it'll still be your home 
for a while. Your stint at the Emerald City in Amherst should, minimally, 
prove educational. But once in a while, you'll get bored with University 
life and expand your interests to the town despite the lack of activity and 
size. 

The Summer Program Council, for example has an agenda full of fun 
things for UMies to do. Movies will either be free or have a small ad- 
mission charge. Films range from Bergman classics to recent Hollywood 
productions. 

In town there are four theatres which show current movies, usually for 
an admission of $2. The Amherst Cinema shows its regular great horn 
flicks Friday nights, Other theatres include the Campus Cinemas-three 
theatres under one roof-at the Zayre shopping center, and the Hadley 
Drive-In on Route 9. The theatres have a dollar night on Monday. 

If you're eating at the dining commons, or are one of the many who can 
cook spaghetti in one pan, you'll probably want to trudge into town 
looking for something to eat. Before you thumb out of the womb, 
remember that the Bluewall, Whitmore Coffee Shop and Little Hatch at 
Worcester dining commons are nearly always open. They don't offer a 
gourmet meal but at least you can pick up a hamburger-type meal, pizza 
or a beer. If you want more than a sandwich, or just want to get out of 
here, here's a list of some notable area restaurants frequented by UMass 
students. 

PAPA's IV-The closest restaurant to campus, located just across from 
Southwest on the corner of Sunset Avenue. The pizza is fair, grinders are 
okay. Average juke box, four pinball machines and average to slow 
service. 

BELL'S-Probably the best known pizza place in town, located beyond the 
Stadium on University Drive. Cheese pizza with extra cheese is great, 
grinders are also good. Service is a lot better than PAPA'S IV. but Bell's 
has no juke box or pinball machines. This is the kind of place you can get 
used to going to every night without knowing why. 

MIKE'S-Many fraternity and sorority members go here just to drink. 
Located in North Amherst, about a mile past the School of Education, 
MIKE'S is crowded every night during regular season. 
THE PUB-This is a class bar, for Amherst. It is also a very good lunch 
restaurant with expensive-type sandwiches. The cheapest time to go is on 
Thursday nights, when beers are only a quarter. It's also a good place for 
a quiet drink in the late afternoon before it gets crowded. 
GAS LITE TWO-A mediocre sandwich shop on North Pleasant Street, 
across from the Mobil station. It's a good place to get a quick lunch. 
GAS LITE ONE-A carbon copy of G.L.II, this is located around the corner 
on Main Street, has about the same menu, and caters to a slightly older 
clientele than G.L.II. Number One closes in the early afternoon, but 
Number Two stays open til 10:30. 

Friendly's-Swinging down to Route 9, right across from Zayre s shopping 
center, this is no different from any other Friendly's on the East coast. 
Open after midnight, this is a good place for an after-movie snack. 
McManus-Located in the Zayre's shopping center, this is almost identical 
to Friendly's. Open late and have good breakfasts. 
Colonel Sanders- Kentucky revisited. 

Hardee 's-Cheap burger place that is above average. It's located on the 
fringe of the shopping center. Chili dogs are mediocre. 
Aqua Vita-Poor juke box and even worse service. Very Italian at- 
mosphere. 

Joe's-In Northampton, about a 20-minute ride from campus, Joe's has 
some of the best pizza around. A lot of Smithies eat here. 
Carlo of Naples-Right around the corner from Smith, this place is very 
homey inside with great Italian food. 

Howard Johnson s-Take a giant step back toward Amherst on Route 9 and 
you'll bump into HoJo's. You know what it's like.. 
Flavortowne-Right up the street from G.L.II, this is the same kind of 
place, although much smaller. It closes about 5:00 p.m. but performs a 
public service to those people who are awake at 6:00 a.m., because that's 
when it opens. 

The Hungry U-"Boston-style subs" and pizza, located just off North 
Pleasant Street in the same block as the Dangling Conversation. This is ft 
high-school place, which is too bad, because the juke box is above 
average. Pinball game cannot be played after midnight. 
Quicksilver This is the official Freak Bar on North Pleasant Street, just 
below the traffic light. It caters to the Free University Set, and has a band 
playing quite often. This place is not quiet, but it offers the cheapest 
drafts in town. 

The Drake This is the bar that made Amherst famous. The original 
college hangout in town, it is the rathskellar in the basement of the 
Village Inn on Amity Street. Excellent drinking, excellent juke box, two 
pool tables, popcorn, peanuts, two color TV's which get Channel 38 and 
the Bruins Games and has the best pinball games in town. The Drake is 
loaded with personalities galore and is a great place in which to make 
both friends and enemies. It is a place for many different kinds of 
University people. Frat guys watch TV, freaks play pool and dance, in- 
tellectuals drink Reingold and eat peanuts and young faculty members 
talk to and drink with their students. The Drake is Amherst. 

(The Drake. Upstairs) -It's food and beer and a fair juke box. A lot of 
freaks and obnoxious people tend to make it their hang out. 
Chequers-Menu includes excellent, moderately priced Italian foods that 
is served at lunch and dinnertimes. Still a cocktail lounge and late-night 
entertainment spot for some of the Amherst jet set. A nice quiet place to 
bring a date on a week night. 

Kalihi Kai Decent Chinese-Polynesian food, but rather high priced for 
what you get. In the lounge, many subtle exotic drinks are offered. Ser- 
vice excellent. 

McDonald's-On Route 9 towards Northampton... You can still get change 
back from your dollar. 

Rusty Scupper A renovated bam near Colonial Village below town that 
combines a nice setting, quiet music and good food and drink. Relatively 
expensive, but sometimes its worth it. 

Rusty Nail-A renovated barn in Sunderland. It's a relatively new place 
with good entertainment you can dance to. 

The Lord Jeff-A history-laden place that has been recently renovated. 
Right in the middle of town, has fine dinner and luncheon offerings and 
good cocktail lounge. Fairly expensive... get your parents to take you 
there. 

Florence Diner-Located in Florence, which is past Northampton. It's an 
area legend, with its cheap chefs specials, prices and atmosphere. 

(Continued on P. 3) 



Page 2 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01003. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Cindy Gonet 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Sports Editor 

Make-Up 

Radical Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Mike Brophy 

Merrie Buchbinder 

Carol Epstein 

Cindy Rogers 




Join Sam and stay cool this summer with 
THE CRIER. 



^■V e^^ ^^ 4*^ *^fc ^*S a**H ^JN ^Fi ^JV a*^ ^K a^"% ^■v ^% ^T* •^■a ^JV ^■k a^^, ^P^ «^S 4*^ e^^ i^^ ^^, a^\ e^p *^^ a^p ^^ 

* * 

* Crier Quiz t 

* * 

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Here we are again with our second quiz, folks! 
Today's Mystery Man is a political leader in a 
foreign country. If YOU want your picture in 
Tuesday's Crier just be the first person to come into 
the Crier office and tell us Mystery Man's name. 
Room 402 Student Union is the place. Good luck! 




Well, people, here's the 
winner of Tuesday's Crier 
Quiz, John Adams of 12 
Brittany Manor Apartments, 
Amherst. John was at the 
Crier office bright and early 
Tuesday morning to inform us 
that our Mystery Man was 
none other than financier and 
Watergate heavy Robert 
Vesco. Congratulations, John, 
you've hit the Big Time! 



* 
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•^»*****»********************** 



Discount Imported Clothes 

THE MERCANTILE 

9 East Pleasant St. 
UNUSUAL GIFTS 

Bedspreads Beads 

Mugs Jewelry 

Pipes <fc Papers 



It's Traffic, Not Parking 



With all the discussion, debate and dissention over 
the parking problem on campus, it is unfortunate that 
no one is examining the issue of parking. In a survey 
taken in May, the COLLEGIAN (UMass student 
newspaper) found that there are plenty of vacant 
parking spots on campus for anyone willing to look 
for them. 

The survey was conducted on a Wednesday from 10 
a.m. to 11 a.m. All the major parking areas on 
campus were investigated. 

Spaces were particularly plentiful in the periphery 
lots like V or M. Parking areas in the Northeast, 
Central, and Orchard Hill sections were filled to 
capacity. 

At 10:00 the area to the rear of Machmer, which is 
closest to the Student Union had two vacant spaces, 
while the areas around Dickinson Hall had several 
each. The lot closest to the bams was only two-thirds 
full. 

6 lot, the big area situated between the Campus 
Center and Marston Hall also had plenty of vacancies 
in the area directly in front of Marston. 

Area 14, which stretches along Governors Drive in 
the area down by the baseball field, was crammed 
full in the lot directly across from the Physical Plant, 
but the lots in the area across from the entrance to 1 
lot were nowhere near capcity. 

M lot near the School of Education was full at its 
entrance, but as you got farther from the School 
spaces became plentiful. The very back of the lot, 
which is close to the Sylvan Area, was about three- 
fourths full. 

There cars were parked illegally and several areas, 
notably the small streets extending from North 
Pleasant Street, to the rear of Morrill, up by the In- 
firmary and past Van Meter and Butterfield were 
disaster areas. 

Lot, which is the interior lot at Orchard Hill, had 
several spaces, but they were all in "Staff Only" 
locations. E. Lot, which is between the dorms and 
East Pleasant Street, was filled almost to capapcity 
but did have several Volkswagen-size spaces. 

Lots 10-13, the large, well-lit lots on the opposite 
side of Massachusetts Avenue from Whitmore all 
were pretty much full. There were maybe 10 spaces 
in the unpaved area of 13 Lot closest to Phillips Street 
and five or so throughout 11 Lot. 

1 Lot, the high priority lot next to Whitmore, didn't 
have anything resembling a parking space in it. The 
one space was in a handicapped zone. 

8 Lot, which encompasses the Southwest horseshoe 
and the upper portion of F Lot, was full in the hor- 
seshoe but only partially full in F Lot. F Lot itself was 
packed fender to fender all the wav to the verv last 



row near the entrance to V Lot. That row was about 
one-fourth full. 

V Lot, the Devil's Island of Student parking, was 
about one-fourth full, with all the cars as close to the 
front as they could be. 

There are plenty of places to park on campus. 
However, instead of being evenly spaced between the 
various lots and areas they are concentrated in 
certain seemingly undesirable lots. 

There are about 17,000 cars registered on campus 
with only 8,000 spaces. About 14,000 cars are parked 
here daily during hunting season. Assigning students 
to lots used to be based on a point-merit system based 
on their status. Registration for pot luck was $5. 

The free transit service came along, then less cars 
came to campus. A parking hike was introduced this 
spring which would up the lot prices to $24, $36, $48, 
$60, or $75, depending on where the lot was. Due to 
protest from all campus, the University abandoned 
its plan. 

Since that time, a new "balanced" proposal has 
been drawn up, in which student input was ignored, or 
"taken under advisement". 

The proposal which will be voted upon by the 
Trustees on Monday sets the fees as follows: $5, 
registration (this includes parking periphery), $12 
edge parking plus $5 registration), $36 core parking 
plus $5 registration. The administration, which at 
least earns a steady income, offered to pay $50 for the 
convenience lot near Whitmore. 

Extended bus service is being offered to the 
periphery parking lots, at either 5 or ten minute in- 
tervals, but inconveniencing everyone concerned 
anyway. (Local bus service has been cut to So. 
Deerfield and Belchertown, as a kick in the pants.) 

The planners of this operation think they are 
dealing with a parking problem, but isn't it in reality a 
traffic problem at 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.? 

With the acceptance of this proposal, students will 
be getting the royal screw... Students who put in time 
at the University, getting paid minimally, will no 
longer have access to student service stickers, which 
they rightfully deserve. Commuters and part-time 
students who have to earn enough to live and pay for 
semester bills, (it is a helluva lot cheaper to live off- 
campus) will end up walking a mile to get to classes 
and pay for it financially in the end. 

The way it looks, the students were set up. The 
witless persons of the administration exacted from 
students a commitment for mass transit. The ad- 
ministration got this promise in preparation to spring 
a parking hike... which students shouldn't consent to 
until the soldiers of Fort Whitmore promise to make 
the middle of campus green. 



Change In The "Drunk" Laws 



By RICHARD M. HOWLAND 
ATTORNEY FOR STUDENTS 

On July 1, 1973, Massachusetts 
abolishes the ancient crime of 
being drunk although all the laws 
having to do with driving under the 
influence remain unchanged. 

As of July 1, the Alcoholism 
Treatment and Rehabilitation Act 
(General Laws chapter 11 IB) will 
govern drunks and drunkeness. As 
with any new procedural law, we 
may expect some confusion in the 
application of the provisions by 
police, citizens and courts at the 
start. 

Section 3 of the statute describes 
a person as "Incapacitated" if he 
is intoxicated "by reason of the 
consumption of intoxicating 
liquor" who "is (1) unconscious, 

(2) in need of medical attention, 

(3) likely to suffer or cause 
physical harm or damage to 
property, or (4) disorderly." 

Section 8 of the statute provides 
that any person who is in- 
capacitated* in a public place 
"may be assisted by a police of- 
ficer with or without his consent to 
his residence, to a (detoxification) 
facility, or to a police station." The' 
police officer may request the 
person to take a test for alcohol, 
including a breath test, but it is not 



Letters To 
The Editor 

The Crier will accept letters 
to the editor. The only 
requirements are that they be 
typed at sixty spaces and 
doubled spaced, and that the 
author (s) sign them and in- 
clude a telephone number for 
reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, 
but a reference number must 
be included. The Crier reserves 
the right to edit letters either 
for space or content according 
to the judgement of the editors 



required nor is it a right of the 
person to be tested. The results of 
any such test are not admissable 
against the person tested for any 
purpose. 

When an incapacitated* person 
is taken to a police station the 
nearest detoxification facility is 
notified. If treatment is available 
the person shall be transported to 
the facility where he may be held 
against his will up to forty-eight 
hours or until he is no longer in- 
capacitated.* whichever is shorter. 

If the facility indicates that 
treatment is not available, the 
incapacitated person may be held 
at the police station in "protective 
custody" until he is no longer in- 
capacitated or twelve hours, 
whichever is shorter. The statute is 
somewhat vague, but as I un- 
derstand its intent, it provides that 
no person may be held in 
"protective custody" against his 
will unless he is incapacitated* as 
defined in Section three. A person 
in "protective custody" is not 
under arrest nor is he charged with 
a crime. Consequently, there is no 
arrest or criminal record although 
an entry is made in the police log of 
the date, time and place of custody. 

The statute is a progressive 
change in an area of considerable 



dilemma. For the most part police 
have used the arrest for 
drunkeness as a protective device 
for inebriated persons. The statute 
does not end this procedure, it 
merely ends the criminal con- 
notations of it. It wisely provides 
that a person who is drunk and 
disorderly shall not be chareed 
with disorderly conduct but shall 
instead be subject to the statute. If 
the officer is acting pursuant to the 
statute he would seem to be im- 
mune from false arrest charges. In 
summary, that would seem to 
require the following steps: 

1. The officer must conclude that 
a person is (a) unconscious, (b) in 
need of medical attention, (c) a 
danger to himself, others or 
property or (d) disorderly by 
reason of consumption of alcohol 
("incapacitated"). 

2. The officer may then employ 
reasonable force to take such 
person into "protective custody" 
(which he should probably advise 
such person, and then may elect to 
transport the person to his 
residence, a facility or the police 
station. In most cases the officer 
will have to take the incapacitated 
person to the police station if he 
has made the first conclusion, 

(Continued on P. 3) 



EATING PLACE 

Campus Plaza Shopping Center 

8,000 PEOPLE CAN'T BE WRONG 

That's how many people eat at 
AAcManus' every week. Why don't 
you join them? 

FAMILY MEALS AT FAMILY PRICES 

BREAKFAST * LUNCH • DINNER 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 




The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page 3 

Renew Your Spirit 

The University offers you an opportunity to renew your spirit and 
become a part of the celebration this summer. Summer Activities 
73 promises to bring an exciting spectrum of re-creation events. 

The Fine Arts Series begins with the hauntingly beautiful rituals 
of dance, which will be performed by George Faison's Universal 
Dance Experience. This will be followed by the brilliant harp- 
sichordist Joseph Payne, who creates a fascinating blend of 
counterpoint and harmony. Late in July the Preservation Hall Jazz 
Band gives audiences a chance to rediscover the vitality and charm 
of the original jazz form. Ms. Veda Zuponcis, reknowned concert 
pianist will present us with a sample of her sensitive musical style. 
Our own University dancers, under the direction of Marilyn Patton 
will provide an additional dance experience. 

Throughout the summer a number of arts, crafts, and 
photographic exhibits will be displayed in the Student Union Art 
Gallery. In addition to the exhibits there will be a sale of original 
graphics and prints. 

Each Wednesday at noon the Campus Center Concourse will 
come alive with the sounds of classical, jazz and folk music. On 
Tuesdays film fans will have a chance to see some favorite films. 
The cinema program ranges from Silent Film Classics and 
Academy Award Winning movies to Prize winning Cartoons. 

And then there is laughter--The Howdy Doody Revival with 
Buffalo Bob Smith will wake memories of an era that many of us 
remember with a smile. 

The man with the word will be Heywood Hale Broun, well known 
CBS commentator and sporlswriter. 

The highpoint of the summer activities will be the Rainbow 
Festival, a polyarts feast. There will be films-there will be crafts- 
there will be poets-there will be music-there will be peace. 

So come take part in the UMass Summer '73 celebration. 



Walter Chesnut plays to an appreciative crowd in the Campus Center yesterday. Not shown in the 
picture is percussionist Peter Tanner. The duo played some unique pieces, and were even accompanied 
by Mrs. Tanner on the flute for a few pieces. 



I Adams Appointed | 



Janus Ingrid Adams has been 
named director of development 
and women's programming at 
public radio station WFCR, Station 
Manager Godwin Oyewole has 
announced. 

Her career in radio and TV 
began in 1969 in New York City 
when she was a researcher and 
writer for "Like It Is" on ABC-TV. 
A year later she was traffic 
reporter for the morning news on 
WNBC radio in New York and went 
from there to WNEW-TV as 
assistant to the producer for the 
Black News show. She won a New 
York Emmy Honor for the latter 
show. 

A graduate of New York City's 
High School of Performing Arts, 
Ms. Adams has a B.A. in theatre 
from the State University of New 



York at New Paltz and an M.A. 
from Mills College. She is a Ph.D. 
candidate in Pan-African culture 
at UMass. 

Beginning in July, she will host a 
new WFCR program,, "The 
Women's Show," from 6 to 6:30 
p.m. Monday through Friday. 



(Continued from P. 1) 

simply for protectiove purposes 
3 . At the police station the officer Campus Card before you can order a 



(Continued from P. 2) 
es and atmosphere. 
The Jolly Bull This is a favorite of 
some administrators. A pretty 
good night spot, a meal here runs 
about $5. During the afternoons 
Top of the Campus style lunches 
are served, with a salad bar. 
The Top of the Campus-High atop 
the Campus Center at UMass, this 
is best for lunches, with the $1.75 
sandwich specials plus salad bar 
offerings. At night, it's not all that 
expensive (about the same as the 
Jolly Bull). One note about this 
place-you need a Top of the 



in charge of the desk officer will be 
required to telephone the nearest 
facility and will probably need to 
report the apparent condition of 
the person and the circumstances 
of the situation. If the facility 
concludes that treatment is 
available the person will be 
transported to it. One may an- 
ticipate that this will be a 
relatively rare occurrence, at least 
in Amherst. 

4. At this point the officer in 
charge should determine that the 
person is incapacitated* and direct 
that he be held in "protective 
custody" until no longer "in- 
capacitated" or for twelve hours, 
whichever is shorter. The details of 
the decision, the reasons, the date 
and time should be entered in the 
log. 

5. The person should be per- 
mitted to make a phone call, but 
others should not be notified 
against the wishes of the person. 

If the procedures are followed by 
the police and understood by 
citizens they should work to the 
benefit of all concerned with a 
minimum of anguish. 



drink. A cocktail lounge in this 
restaurant opens at 11:30 a.m. 
Wiggins Tavern-In the Hotel 
Northampton, this has a rustic 
atmosphere and the food is pretty 
good. The check for two could 
return a little change from your 
$20. 

The Grist Mill-Drive down through 
the center of town and past 
Amherst College for a mile and 
you'll hit this place. It has that old 
Colonial atmosphere, good food, 
and is moderately expensive. 
Steak Out A new restaurant in 
town. Excellent dinners, but rather 
expensive. You get what you pay 
for. On University Drive. 
Wine Chariot On Route 9 in 
Hadley, not too many student- 
types go here. Everything is 
delicious but much, much, much 
too expensive. 

Domino's Pina-Free delivery, 
fairly good pizza. 
Eric's Giant Sub-Located on Route 
9 toward Belchertown, this place 
has terrific sub sandwiches which 
are huge. Prices are moderate. 
Quality good. Besides, Eric's a 
nice guy. 




— \[ AMHERST'S Om EEPAKTMENf SWEJT 

Good Used Jeans 2.50 
White Sailor Pants 2.95 



(Wfl-TOTHE ftttfOFflCE ON N. PLEASANT $1711 



ram 



Amherst, Mass. -This fall, 100 
selected freshmen at the 
University of Massachusetts in 
Amherst will be the first to study in 
an alternate educational project 
called the Global Survival Fresh- 
man Year Program. 

Global survival is a concept that 
originates with the Center for 
International Education at the 
UMass School of Education. It is a 
program of interdisciplinary 
studies based on the view that 
certain fundamental concerns of 
the present and future must be 
understood if this planet is to 
survive. 

These concerns are war, peace 
and world order; cross-cultural 
communication and conflict; 
environmental deterioration and 
economic development; 
population; and resources and 
their distribution. 



The freshman year program will 
examine each of these five areas of 
concern, beginning with an in- 
tensive four- week course. After 
this the 100 freshmen will take 
courses specially designed for the 
program by a selected group of 
global studies core faculty. 
Related courses from a variety of 
UMass departments will be added, 
plus symposiums and independent 
study options. 

The global survival program is 
meant to be an intellectually- 
challenging, first year college 
program, designed to provide an 
alternative framework for study in 
the arts, sciences and professional 
schools. 



UMass 

Polici 
5-2121 



i 



Amherst's Tire Store 



In the core faculty group is 
anthropologist Sylvia Forman, 
physicist Allan Hoffman, 
education specialist Horace Reed, 
engineer Charles Hutchinson and 
botanist Carl Swanson. In addition 
to teaching, each has had a hand in 
the planning and development of 
the program. 

The 100 freshmen are being 
chosen from a variety of 
backgrounds and interests. Some 
places in the initial class are still 
open; full information on the 
program is available from the 
Global Survival Freshman Year 
director, Steve Guild, at Wysocki 
House, UMass, Amherst, 01002, 

545-2064. 

»■•■•■ 



man 



y 



Firestone 
MICHELIN 



Shell Jetzon 
X Veith 



Le Havre Radial Tire* 




Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 



J 





5 



e PLAZA SHELL <©> 



V/Imjif rst Opticalf^tan*' 



!!).'> North PlriiNunt St., - 



I 

: 



T«»tn| 



Amherst— Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPIN 24 HOURS 



Mil 



hillM 



George Faison 

Universal Dance Experience 

Reserve Seat Tickets: 

Free w/UMass Summer Student ID 

All others $1.50 

Available At Student Union Lobby 

Sponsored by Summer Activities 



Bowker Auditorium, Thursday July 5th 8 p.m. 




Page 4 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



PULSE Re-evaluates, 
Ready To Move Forward 



By CINDY ROGERS 

If you were one of the students 
who received a surprise phone call 
some Tuesday night during the 
past year as I had, and someone 
asked you questions about some 
topic such as WFCR, rent and fees 
of the dorms, weekend meal tickets 
or even study skills, then to you 
project PULSE is no mystery. For 
most of you who didn't, it is the 
public opinion sampling 
organization for the University 
that has conducted 17 surveys 
during the past year to randomly- 
selected students. Perhaps you will 
receive a call from them some 
Tuesday night next fall as Project 
PULSE begins their second year of 
operation. 

Before PULSE gets underway for 
next fall, it has evaluated changes 
made during last semester over 
first semester. As in the fall, 
PULSE operated under the 
directorship of Dr. Larry Benedict 
of the UMASS School of Education 
and with the participation of work- 
study students and graduate 

Wounded Knee: 



students. Some of the changes 
made were increases of staff to 
allow them to contact more people, 
and a small amount of earned 
capital was set aside to acquire a 
few of the material necessities 
which had been foregone or 
borrowed during the first semester 
of operation. 

These changes did increase 
PULSE'S contact rates on some 
surveys, but there were also 
countervailing conditions such as 
basketball games or evening 
classes which kept down the 
number of people actually con- 
tacted for a few of the surveys. 
However, this is a factor that no 
phone survey can control in ad- 
vance. 

Much of PULSE'S evaluation of 
its success is based on data it has 
received from its clientele. This 
data is being used by the PULSE 
staff to improve its function of 
providing student opinion data to 
university decision makers. 

When the clientele were asked 
for what purpose the data was to be 



used, the majority of the clients 
responded that the data was a 
means of finding out how students 
felt about their particular topic and 
how to improve their particular 
service. Also it was found that most 
of the data received was wanted 
and sufficient for the clients' 
purposes. 

Added criticisms by the clients 
asked for a larger sample base and 
for PULSE to develop a sampling 
technique that provided more 
observation per specific problem 
to be analyzed. 

In conclusion, PULSE feels that 
it has met the purposes specified 
for it. that is to develop and provide 
a system whereby a rapid response 
could be obtained from the student 
body on any subject matter, and to 
fill a vital gap in available in- 
formation. 

Future plans include "a broader 
dissemination of its work, services 
and survey results, continued 
systematic development of the 
system and expansion of survey 
services to a broader clientele." 



Nothing Left to Lose 



By CAROL EPSTEIN 
Comm. To Support Wounded Knee 

It has been two months since the 
occupation of Wounded Knee en- 
ded, but the struggle of the Oglala 
Sioux for recognition of their 
inalienable rights as people rages 
on. These people are fighting for 
their lives as well as the life of their 
culture. 

With the advent of compulsory 
education, Native Americans have 
been herded into over-crowded 
schools where they are inculcated 
with the remnants of Western 
Civilization. History books ignore 
the effects of "civilization" on the 
Native Americans and virtually 
delete the incidences of Indian 
massacre. It is not surprising that 
there is a high percentage of 
alcoholism, crime, and mortality 
amongst these prisoners of white 
man's ways. Not only have we 
robbed them of their land, but we 
have rejected their culture and 
destroyed their dignity. 

To insure that basic Indian 
survival skills are passed on, many 
available funds have been used to 
start Survival Schools. The schools 
teach culture, history (i.e., Indian 
history as it really was), folklore, 
dancing, singing, hunting skills, 
clothes making, pottery, and most 
importantly, a sense of pride in the 



birthright left them by the great 
chiefs. 

Education is vital, but food, 
clothing, medical supplies and 
adequate housing are 

NECESSARY. The 1973 occupation 
of Wounded Knee by the Govern- 
ment, in the person of United 
States Marshals, denied the Oglala 
Sioux these necessities. Federal 
roadblocks were erected in the 
hope of starving the Indians into 
submission, a trading post was 
burned, and electricity was shut 
off. Land within the village was 
burned by flares dropped from 
planes, and houses were destroyed. 

After seventy days, the 
Government agreed to meet the 
demands of the Wounded Knee 
occupants: 

-The U.S. government will finally 
re-examine the original 1868 Sioux 
treaty and its obligations under 
that treaty at a meeting between 
traditional Oglala leaders and 
representatives from the White 
House. 

-and the government must in- 
vestigate corruption on the part of 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
the tribal government and 
violations of civil rights and 
criminal law on the reservation. 

Even though these demands 



have not been adhered to, a small 
but significant victory has been 
achieved by the Oglala Sioux - 
acknowledgement by the govern- 
ment of their broken promises. 
There are still many more battles 
to be fought for recognition of 
equality, and many debts to be 
paid. 

The Committee to Support 
Wounded Knee, in Amherst, is 
currently involved in collecting 
money for legal defense. With the 
support of the Student Senate and 
the Program Council, the com- 
mittee is sponsoring a rally to be 
held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30, 
on the South Terrace of the Student 
Union (rain location is rooms 162- 
163 of the Campus Center). The 
featured speakers are Bill Zim- 
merman, an attorney from Boston 
who works with Medical Aid to 
Indochina and was one of the 
participants in the airlift on April 
17, that dropped food and medical 
supplies on the Wounded Knee 
residents; Cary Playter, a law 
student from Boston who spent the 
last month in Rapid City, South 
Dakota working on legal defense 
for the indicted occupiers ; and Rob 
Doyle, an attorney from Boston, 
who along with Cary, was working 
on legal defense in Rapid City. 
They need your support. Please 
attend. 



GAMES AREA 

Student Union 

HOURS: 11 A.M. - 2 P.M. 
MONDAY - FRIDAY 

Featuring: Pocket Billiards, 
Table Tennis, Foozball, 

Bumper Pool 





The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page 5 



jji_IH!§! 



•\ j* <Tt. 



Helicopter moves ventilating equipment from the ground at the 
University of Massaehusetts-Amherst to the top of a 22-story 
residence hall in the Southwest Residence Complex. UMass officials 
decided to use the helicopter method rather than move the equip- 
ment by crane for reasons of speed and economy. "Several thousand 
dollars" were saved, according to UMass Design Engineer John 
Hartley, and the job was done in less than an hour, instead of the 
several days a crane would have involved. Ventilating cabinets were 
needed for machinery rooms on roofs of five residence towers to 
provide ventilation for machinery for the buildings' passenger 
elevators. Proper ventilation, said Mr. Hartley, prolongs the life of 
the electronic equipment of the elevators. The five ventilating 
cabinets went up Monday, each in two eight-foot sections, together 
weighing about 300 pounds. The helicopter worked Tuesday at Herter 
Hall classroom building, taking up a 1,100-pound chilling coil for the 
building's air-conditioning system. Keystone Helicopter Corporation 
of Westchester, Penn., supplied the vehicle. 

"Chemistry For The Consumer" 



Amherst, Mass. --An evening 
course on "Chemistry for the 
Consumer" will be given by the 
University of Massachusetts 
Division of Continuing Education 
in its summer session June 25 to 
Aug. 14. 

The non-credit course will be 
taught Tuesday evenings by Dr. 
Philip Feidelseit of Brattleboro, 
Vt., a former Uniroyal research 
chemist who has taught at Dart- 



mouth and Windham Colleges. 

The course will include a short 
review of basic chemistry and then 
examine the chemical nature of 
modern consumer items. Topics 
will include food additives, soaps, 
tires, paints, medicines and toxic 
chemicals. 

Full information is available 
from the Division of Continuing 
Education, 920 Campus Center, 
UMass, Amherst, 01002. 



UMass Gets 
$45,943 Grant 



U.S. Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R- 
Mass. , and Sen. Edward W. Brooke 
today announced that UMass has 
been awarded a $45,943 grant from 
the National Institute of Mental 
Health. The grant will finance the 
first year of a two year training 
program for peer sex education. 
Principal investigator will be 
Ronald Mazur. 






AMHERST CHINESE 
FOOD 

62 Main Tel 253-7835 

Lunch Special S1.2S 

Dinner Special S2.00 

Many other Dishes 
Eat in or Take Out 

Hours : Mon, Tues, Thur s 12-10 p.m 
Fri. ft Sat. Noon-Midnight 
Sun 4-10 p.m. Closed Wed. 



Radio /hack 

of AMHERST 

318 COLLEGE ST. - RTE. No. 9 

One Mile East of Amherst College 

Where Everyone Meets To See, Hear 
and Purchase SOUND - - On The Go Or To Live-In 

Radios - Stereos - Phones 
Tape Players and Recorders 

HOURS: 10 to 5:30 MON. - THURS. 
10 to 8 Friday 
9 9 to 5 SATURDAY 




&* v ! "Historic Preservation" 
Is Deerfield Theme 



"Historic Preservation" is the theme of the Old Deerfield film and 
lecture series for the summer of '73. Pictured here is a house in Old 
Deerfield, which is one of the nicer towns in the Valley. 



"Historic Preservation" is the 
theme of Historic Deerfield's 1973 
Summer Lecture and Film Series. 
The series will open tomorrow with 
a lecture by Dr. Abbott Lowell 
Cummings on "Historic Preser- 
vation in New England: A History 
of Changing Philosophies." The 
lecture will be held in the White 
Church (Community Center) on 
Memorial Street in Old Deerfield 
at 8:00 p.m. 

Abbott Lowell Cummings is 
Director of the Society for the 
Preservation of New England 
Antiquities in Boston and a well- 
known author, lecturer, and 
consultant on New England ar- 
chitecture and its preservation. He 
has been for many years Editor of 
the periodical, Old Time New 
England and is the author of 
several books and articles on the 
arts and crafts in early America. 
Dr. Cummings will illustrate his 
lecture by color slides and by 
discussion of several important 



Summer Offerings From 
Continuing Education 



As part of its first summer evening program, the 
Division of Continuing Education at UMass is of- 
fering a group of three non-credit evening courses of 
general interest. The Division will award Continuing 
Education Units for successful completion of the 
courses. One CEU is awarded for ten hours of par- 
ticipation in a program of sufficient academic merit 
for which traditional credit is not given. 

CE 130, "The Manala as a Way of Centering: 
Chinese, Tibetan, Navaho," focuses on a cross- 
cultural explanation of the meaning and use of 
madalas among the Chinese, Tibetans and Navahos. 
A mandala is a geometric design for meditation and 
centering, usually consisting of squares and circles 
arranged symmetrically inside one another, often 
filled with many Buddha-figures. The illustrated 
workbook "Mandala" by Jose and Miriam Aguelles is 
studied, in the context of the authors' evolutionary 
vision of man's unfolding consciousness 

Readiness to take seriously the project of un- 
derstanding and using the mandalas is the only 
prerequisite. A fee of $65 will be charged for the 
course, which will meet Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings at the Amherst campus and will be taught 
by Ms. Teresina Havens. 

CE 990, "Basic Genealogy," meets Monday and 
Wednesday evenings. The student becomes 
acquainted with principles of original research in 
American genealogy and may compile a family 
history by learning and utilizing the basic, scientific 
approach to research and genealogy. A fee of $65 is 
charged for the course, plus a materials fee of $2. The 
instructor will be Mr. David Stoddard. 

CE 001, "Real Estate," is taught by a licensed and 
practicing realtor. Topics include the role of the 
broker, contractual concepts and agreements, 
ownership rights and legal documents, titles, in- 
surance, management, and financing. The course 
covers all the essentials for obtaining a broker's 
license. The textbooks are included with the course 
fee of $81. The course, which meets Tuesday 



evenings, is taught by Mr. Robert Chisholm, a 
prominent Amherst realtor. 

Classes begin the week of June 25 and end the week 
of August 13. A registration fee of $5 is charged to all 
in-person course registrants. Further information on 
the Division's Summer Session can be obtained from 
the Division of Continuing Education, 321 Arnold 
House, telephone (413) 545-0480. 



*»•♦• 



A whole new way of communicating will be taught 
in "Learn to Talk With Your Hands," a course being 
given this summer through the UMass Division of 
Continuing Education. 

Manual communication-sign language and finger 
spelling-is an eight week course designed to teach 
elementary basic skills needed to communicate with 
the hearing impaired. Individuals enrolled in this 
course will have the opportunity to use their newly- 
learned communication skills in the form of songs, 
poetry and classroom discussions. 

The course will be offered from 7 to 10 p.m. at 
UMass Thursday. The instructor will be Ms. Maxine 
Childress Brown, a professional staff member in the 
Media Specialists Program for the Deaf at UMass. 

Being offered also are two graduate courses on 
Westover Air Force Base. Foundations of Education 
will be taught by Jack L. Hruska, University 
Assistant Professor of Education, and is scheduled 
for Monday and Wednesday evenings. Fred Finch, 
Associate Professor of Management of the University 
School of Business Administration, will instruct a 
course in Organizational Behavior on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings. 

The courses are being offered in connection with 
the Division's Air Force graduate program in 
Educational Administration. They are open to 
members of the local civilian and military com- 
munities who have completed a baccalaureate 
degree program. 

Full details are available from Division of Con- 
tinuing Education, 920 Campus Center. 



RALLY FOR 
WOUNDED KNEE 

With Speakers: BILL ZIMMERMAN 

Boston Attorney who participated in the airlift 

CARY PLAYTER 



Sponsored By: 



ROB DOYLE 

Committee to Support Wounded Knee; 
Student Senate; and Program Council 



FRIDAY 2:30 - South Terrace of Student Union 

In Case of Rain Rm. 162 CC 



cases in the history of preservation 
in New England. 

In announcing the Summer 
Lecture and Film Series, Donald 
R. Friary, Director of Education at 
Historic Deerfield, said, "It is 
particularly appropriate in the 
Tercentenary year of the Town of 
Deerfield to focus this program on 
historic preservation, because 
Deerfield was the birthplace of the 
preservation movement in 
America. When the original Old 
Indian House was to be torn down 
in 1847, several Deerfield town- 
speople joined together in an effort 
to save it. This venture has 
frequently been cited as the first 
organized preservation movement 
in the United States. 

Although it failed, it set the 
pattern for subsequent successful 
efforts throughout the nation ." 

Forthcoming events in the series 
will be a film, "A Future for the 
Past," produced by the British 
Civic Trust on Monday, July 2; a 



lecture on "Historical Archaeology 
in Southern New England" by 
James J. F. Deetz, Assistant 
Director of Plimouth Plantation 
and Professor of Anthropology at 
Brown University, on Wednesday, 
July 18; and a lecture by Ted 
Sande, Lecturer in Art at Williams 
College, on "New England's In- 
dustrial Architecture, and the 
Concept of Comprehensive 
Preservation" on Monday, July 30. 
Each of these will be held in the 
White Church at 8:00 p.m. 

The Historic Deerfield Lecture 
and Film Series is open to the 
public Admission is free and all 
are welcome. 



Infirmary 

(In An 
■mnraency) 

[54] 5-2671 



Community Homes For Children 

is having the drawing 
for a 

1973 TOYOTA 

and over 50 other prizes 
Saturday, June 30th 
on the Amherst Common 

There will be 
•Music (Crazee Jack) 

•Food (Steamed Clams, Hotdogs) 
•Clowns (Joeys Three) 

Day Starts at Noon 
Drawing will be at about 3:00 
Still Time To Get Tickets 
See You There! 






Old 
Weird Harolds 

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RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST 8 NORTHAMPTON 

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USED JEANS 2 for $ 3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 



WORK SHIRTS 



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USED OVERALLS & 
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USED VESTS 


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2 for $ 3 



NEW 




SLEEPING BAGS 9 7~- * a farm 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 

UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 

$ 5.0 



ONLY 










The Crier — University of Massachusetts — Page 7 



Page 6 — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Summer Theatre Happenings For Kids 



Floyd Bailey will head the 
Masque's Children's Theatre 
Workshop, created im- 

provisationally by adults. The first 
two weeks will be spent in- 
troducing improvisat ional 
techniques and acting exercises. 
The remaining time will be 
devoted to preparation for per- 
formance: adaptations of The 



Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein and 
The Oak That Would Not Pay by 
Maria Elena de la Iglesia. The 
Company will tour the Amherst 
area and environs with these 
childrens productions. Both of the 
performance workshops will be 
free of charge to student and 
community audiences. 
A Movement Workshop, led by 



The Fall Of The House Of Usher 



Vincent Price, Mark Damon, Myrna Fahey 

Edgar Allen Poe's sinister atmosphere of evil is chillingly 
recaptured in this shocking classic centering around 
Roderick Usher and his sister Madeline. They are the last 
survivors of an old family, and they both suffer from a 
strange madness of the Usher family. Gloomily and insanely 
determined that the evil of the house must end with him and 
his sister, he buries her alive and proceeds to plot the 
destruction of the eerie mansion. Terror lurks throughout 
this horror house of murky secret passageways and cob- 
webbed burial crypts as the tale rages towards its ghastly 
climax. 

Monday, July 2, CC Auditorium 
8 p.m. FREE 




AMHERST(V«a 

AMITY ST. . AMHERST 



NOW 



PLAYING 



AT BOTH 
THEATRES 



CALVIN THEATRE 

KING ST. NORTHAMPTON 



EVES. 7:00 a 9:00 
SAT. a SUN. MAT: 2:00 

Meet Sid Caesar, 
"The funniest man in America," 



— Esquire Magazine 




MAX UtdMANb 

T«n FAom 



VOUR/HOW 
Of/HOUl/ 

SID CAESAR IMOGENE COCA CARL REINER HOWARD 

. MAX LIEBMAN MORRIS 



MONTI I S \U, SKATS Si. 00 

\t Horn nil: \thi:s 



Stephan Driscoll, will include 
instruction in the discipline and 
techniques of yoga, modern jazz 
and ballet, dance improvisation, 
breathing exercises, and mime. 
The group will work in a variety of 
spaces, indoors and out. 

A seminar in the design and 
construction of costume, directed 
by Ruth Seligman, will include 
discussion of the design process 
and basic techniques of sewing. 
The participants will have the 
opportunity to aid in the making of 
costumes for the Masque 
productions and will be involved in 
the design of the workshop 
productions. 

A Set Construction Workshop, 
under the instruction of Ray 
Nichols, will be a practical course 
in the basics of set construction 
including the use of tools and 
materials. Participants will have 
the opportunity to aid in the con- 
struction and technical aspects of 
the main stage Masque produc- 
tions, as well as workshop 
productions. 

The Masque will also offer a 
workshop in Video Tape and Film 
under the direction of Coley 
Blodgett (Prerequisite: Speech 
223, Program Process in 
Television, or equivalent), 
reviewing film and video tape 
techniques. The seminar will 
premiere pilot films on American 
Indian Art and the poetry of Robert 
Frost. 

Those interested in joining one or 
more of the Masque Workshops 
should contact our office, 328 
Student Union, (545-2271). 



Notices 



WMUA, stereo 91.1 FM will be 
broadc.sting all summer. For 
those of you who are new here, 
WMUA is the UMass student radio 
station, and it's located on campus 

in Marston Hall. 

• • * 

LOST - Long haired light orange 
cat. Answers to Butternut. Please 
call 546-4572. Reward. 



* * * 



"The Beatles: A film of their 
first U.S. concert-1964" stars John, 
Paul, George and Ringo doing 
"She Loves You," "I Wanna Hold 
Your Hand," and ten of their other 
Beatlemania era heavies. Also 
showing are roadrunner cartoons. 
Tonight at 8:00 and 9:30 in Mahar 
Auditorium (on campus). 




Gold-Diggers 
of '33 

T0NITE 

7:30 and 9:15 CCA 
Amherst Film Coop. 



Summer is for children, and in their honor the Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theatre is opening its fourth season with a show for kids of all 
ages, George Bernard Shaw's "Androcles and the Lion", adapted for 
children, now through June 30 at 10:30 a.m. in the Richard Glenn Gettell 
Amphitheater on the Mount Holyoke College campus. 

The delightful story of the lion with the thorn in his paw is a well-known 
favorite, and as told by Shaw it includes many humorous characters. 
Little Androcles who finds that his brave kindness to the seemingly 
ferocious animal stands him in good stead when the tables are turned ; his 
nagging wife Mageara who is dismayed by her husband's friendship with 
a lion; and the fun-loving lion himself, played by Nana Greenwalk, a 
familiar face to Summer Theatre audiences who played Patty in last 
season's "You're A Good Many, Charlie Brown." 

Directed by Judy Yeckel, who directed "The Emperor's New Clothes" 
for the Westover Theatre Guild last winter and a children's ensemble 
which toured area grade schools in January, the vivacious and colorful 
"Androcles and the Lion" promises to provide an hour of excellent en- 
tertainment for children of all ages (as well as adults). The beautiful out- 
of-doors amphitheater adds a lovely green background for the forest and 
coliseum, and lots of room for breathing. 

Tickets for this first show are 75t, and are available at the Summer 
Theatre box office between 10 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily except Sunday, or 
they may be purchased at the door. There is a 10% discount on tickets for 
groups over 25, and groups tickets may be reserved by telephoning the 
box office at (413) 538-2406. There are no reserved seats for "Androcles 
and the Lion." 



They shared more than their rooms! 



Ek*r7« 



HADLEY 



J3Q3L.I 



RUSSELL ST. ameesHseaeaaM 

RT. 9 HADLEY 584-2645 



CLASS 







ACADEMY 



ISMIrS 



AT THE GATES 
OF SMITH COLLEGE 



NOW— Ends Tues. 
at7:00&9:00 
Don't Miss It! 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 584-8435 



IIMIIIIIIIIIIIII 



FIT 



jnttMi) 



S5J5SS?J«™J 



VflRRE 




andBIMY 
TIE III 




R !? MFTHOC.i >li H-i ■ PANAViSOV MGM 

JAMES COBURN 
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON 

Monday & Tuesday — BALCONY SEATS are $1. 
^ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■MTMTfl 




"6EATLES: "Their First U.S. Concert 1964" 

PIUS ROADRUNNER CARTOONS 

Thurs., June 28 - 8 & 9:30 • Mahar Auditorium 




Sports Notices 



The IM season for the summer 
session is soon to start so be sure to 
get your entries in. Interested 
persons should report to 215 
Boyden to check the appropriate 

deadlines. 

♦ * ♦ 

Anyone interested in writing 
sports for the Crier should contact 
either Mike Brophy, 253-2611, or 
Marty Kelley, 253-9239, and let 



them know what field they are 
interested in. Feature writers are 
wanted desperately. Have you 
often dreamed of becoming an 
Arthur Daley? Well, now is your 

chance. 

* • * 

Be sure to check out the baseball 
trivia quiz below. Test out your 
knowledge of the game that is 
trivia ridden. 



John Healy, catching standout for the Minute men this past season, is shown taking an outside pitch for 
a ball in action this past spring. 



Mike Brophy 



Summer Training 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Yesterday s Puzzle 



The campus of UMass lies basically idle during the 
summer months, save for the 3,500 summer students, 
various conferences and the New England Patriots 
that number around 150 upon arrival. And that thins 
out very rapidly as the daily cuts of Fairbanks will 
take their toll. 

Meanwhile, every summer the AAU and USOC are 
looking for available facilities to train athletes for the 
various competitions that go on. The UMass campus, 
with all of its athletic fields, facilities and open dorm 
space, would serve as an ideal training base for 
American athletes. Llewellyn Derby is one of the best 
tracks in the country while the baseball diamond is of 
major league quality. There are numerous swimming 
pools, squash courts, and tennis courts for the use 
during these months and the publicity could do 
nothing but good for University Public Relations. If 
nationally prominent athletes were to be in training 
here all summer long, it would follow that the major 
media networks would run periodic features on their 
progress. The lure of the sporting men would be 
tremendous. The University could do nothing but 
profit from such an adventure. 

Baseball 
Trivia Quiz 

1.) The mayor of Milwaukee 
recently proclaimed a day in 
commeration of an active player's 
contributions to the city that has 
become famous for great beer and 
great baseball. Name the player 
and the situations surrounding the 
date. 

2.) Inducted into the Hall of 
Fame in 1946, he played in the 
majors from 1899-1909 and com- 
piled a 198-127 won-lost record in 
the eleven years he pitched. He 
was born in the Pioneer Valley. 
Name this Hall of Famer. 

3.) Name the first president of 
the National League. 

4.) Who is the "Father of Modern 
Baseball "? 

5.) Babe Ruth, perhaps the 
greatest man to play baseball, was 
a noted pitcher as well as hitter. 
For what feat was selected to the 
Hall Of Fame? 

6.) In the 1965 All-Star game the 
National League won by a 6-5 score 
on three home runs by Willie Mays, 
Joe Torre, and Willie Stargell. Who 
was the winning pitcher for the 
NL? 

7.) Speaking of All-Star games 
when was the first such baseball 
game played? 

8.) On September 28, 1919, New 
York and Philadelphia squared off 
in a doubleheader. Before the 
afternoon was over, the two teams 
would share in a major league 
record. What is this record? 

9.) What did Guss Bell, Smokey 
Burgess, and Ralph Kiner all have 
in common? 

10.) Who was the last player to 
hit four HRs in one game? 

Classifieds 

RIDE WANTED 

Going my way? Need ride from Spfld. 
daily for summer will shard driving and 
* Please call Ruthann at 7369224. 

FOR SALE 

Pioneer SX 770 STE REO receiver, 20 
watts/channel and pair of LKH 17' 
speakers $300 or best offer Call Mark 
545 2093 weekdays 



The revenue the Patriots bring in during their 
summer camp, simply by renting the dorm space and 
contracting x number of meals, is staggering. 
Imagine, if you will, what a camp of hundreds of 
collegiate athletes would bring in! 

This then would answer all those questions, posed 
in recent years, about what to do with all the unused 
dorms during the summer months. Isn't it worth 
investigating further? Call upon the officials here at 
UMass to look into the possibilities. 

The groups are around that would be interested in 
using the facilities. Amherst College has, for the past 
four years played host to the Harry Hopman Tennis 
Camp, Greenfield hosts the Pocumtuck Hockey 
School. Imagine if Greg Olchowski were to move his 
camp to UMass for the eight weeks it is running. If 
this new rink materializes in the near future then the 
possibility would exist for next summer. 

If a rink were to be built and used during the 
summer months, then a figure skating camp might 
also look into moving to this area. The possibilities 
are unending. 



ACROSS 

1 Quarrel 

5 Pierce 

9 Cry of goat 

12 Alms box 

13 Region 

14 Help 

15 Preposition 

16 Masculine 

18 Shell that tails 
to explode 

20 Manuscript 
(abbr) 

22 Bark cloth 

24 Algonquian In- 
diana 

27 Small doga 

29 Sprint 

31 Cleaning uten- 

sil 

32 South 

American 
animal 
34 Want 

36 Compass point 

37 Concurs 
39 Hairy 

41 Symbol for tan- 

talum 

42 Periods of time 

44 Man's name 

45 Greek letter 
47 Spanish pot 

49 Young boys 

50 Clan 

52 Biblical weed 

54 French article 

55 Decay 

57 Unit of electri- 
cal measure- 
ment 

59 Note of scale 

61 Silkworm 

63 Imitates 

65 Above 

67 Be ill 

68 Attitude 

69 Small lumps 



DOWN 

1 Posed for 

portrait 

2 Declare 

3 Alternating cur- 

rent (abbr.) 

4 Scottish cap 

5 Dinner course 

6 Surgical saw 

7 Diphthong 

8 Evil 

9 Title of respect 

10 Three-toed 

sloth 

11 Paid notice 
17 Near 

19 Pronoun 

21 Mast 

23 On the ocean 

25 Deliberated 

26 Hurries 

27 Pieces of din- 

nerware 

28 Pintail duck 



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30 Flock 
33 Danish island 
35 Face of watch 
38 Seasoning 
40 Egg-shaped 
43 Drudges 
46 A month 
48 Got up 
51 Preposition 



53 Spanish article 
56 Hit lightly 
58 Haul 

60 Bitter vetch 

61 Babylonian 

deity 

62 A state (abbr.) 
64 River in Italy 
66 A state (abbr.) 



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Pag* « — University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



McMahon, Flanagan Sign Pacts 



By MIKE BROPHY 

The 1973 UMass baseball team 
compiled a respectable 29-9-1 
record on the year but three of 
those losses came in rapid suc- 
cession at the end of the season, 
thusly eliminating the Minutemen 
from the New England Tour- 
nament hosted by Harvard. 

Perhaps the post season 
highlight of UMass baseball was 
the fact that the pro baseball draft 
picked two of the Minutemen to 
play pro baseball starting this 
summer. Ed McMahon, drafted on 
the second round in New York by 
the Minnesota Twins, signed a 
large bonus contract and then 
reported to the Twins' AAA team in 
Tacoma, Washington. 

Mike Flanagan, undefeated 
pitching ace going into the Har- 
vard game in Fenway with a 9-0 
mark, was chosen by the 
Baltimore Orioles on the 14th 
round and also inked a sizeable 
bonus contract soon after the draft 
was completed. 

Tom White, co-captain of the 
team, was overlooked in the June 
draft, but, according to reliable 
sources is now talking with three 



ball teams about the possibilities of 
signing as a free agent. "I want to 
play baseball and will do anything 
to break into pro baseball. I was 
drafted out of high school by the 
Astros but I guess things just 
weren't right this spring," said 
White. 

UMass Coach Dick Bergquist, 
like any other coach who loses his 
good men to the pro ranks, felt 
happy for the two who have signed, 
"We are an academic institution 
and our job is to prepare young 
people to pursue their own walk of 
life when they are ready to do so. 
Ed and Mike, are ready to go out in 
the world now. Why should they 
wait when the gate is open now?" 
He continued, "I wish both of them 
the best of luck and I also want to 
wish Tom (White) the best of luck 
in finding a team." 

It was a year that saw the UMass 
hitters dominate the New England 
collegiate baseball titles as Steve 
Newell rapped out 12 doubles on 
the year and finished with a .387 
batting average. His 31 rbi's on the 
year was also a team leading 
catagory. Mark Palau, third 
baseman, was hot on Newell's tail 



with 24. Newell had five homers on 
the year while Palau collected 
three. 

Of the hitters, Mike Flanagan set 
a national collegiate record when, 
while pitching (with a virus), he 
had three home runs in four times 



STUDENTS: (and other human beings at UMass.) 

IF. ..you would like to be a preferred consumer, rather than a neglected 

customer. ..and 
IF. ..you wouldn't mind getting some good deals, rather than some good rip- 

offs.and 
IF.. .you are turned on by saving your hard-earned cash more than living on 

a shoe-string. ..and 
IF. ..you're the type of person who insists on getting at least what you pay 

for, rather than the least you could get for what you pay. ..and 
IF. ..you could do all this. ..Plus help remedy the poor conditions at the 

Belchertown State School at the same time, 
You would buy a Golden Book of Values. ..TODAY. 

T* 1* 1j t* *n ^F ^F ^F ^F ^r ^F ^F ^F ^F ^F t^ t* t* t* t* 1* 1* *r* 1* 'r* ^* *tF t^ "j* "f* »T 
WHAT IS A GOLDEN BOOK? 

It's a consumer's directory to over 100 quality local merchants in your 
trading zone, with a membership card that entitles you to several hundred 
dollars worth of savings on products and services, ok? 

HOW DO YOU GET ONE? 

Many of your fellow students are circulating GOLDEN BOOKS AS 
THEIR SUMMER JOB, IF YOU MEET ONE ASK HIM OR HER TO SHOW 
YOU THE UNBELIEVABLE SAVINGS. If you can't wait, mail a $15 check 
to Golden Book at 39 Main St., Northampton, and we'll rush you your 
membership. 

••X** *^^ ^^r* ^^r* ^^* **[jtl* ^^f* ^l* ^^r* *X* *X* ^^ *•& ^X^ ^L* *^^ ^^r* ^^r* ^^ ^^ ^^ ^t* *^P ^1* "'■L" *^»* ^^ *~X * *-j V* ^| j» 

^^ ^f* ^^ ^** ^* ^^ ^^ ^* ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ *^ *^^ ^* ^^ ^4^ ^^ ^* ^J*» ^^ ^^ ^T* *^ ^^ ^^^s ^K *»f» Sft 

WHAT KINDS OF SAVINGS ARE THERE IN THIS FOR $15? 

How do these examples sound? Two meals for the price of one, two pizzas 
for the price of one, discounts on gas, repairs for your car, and tires -- up to 
50%. Specials on Amusements, Skiing, Entertainment, Books, Snacks, 
Pets, Records, Shoes, Clothing, and Sporting Goods, to name a few. AND 
90% of the specials and discounts are good as many times as You want 
them to be. 

. \m *-il-* *>^# *A" *-jl •* ^^^ "A* ^^^ ^J^ ^^^ ~~ \j* **^^ *>i^ fc uV" ^Jj* fc-t,* *- fj» «v^» *^^ *'iV J *~jj-* "'Ar* "~^* ^^^ *~A ^ ^^^ *"A * fc ti* *4* ~it^ ■ 
^^ "■^■» ^^* ^T™ *"9* ^^^ ^t^ ^t^ ^#^ ^t^ ^t" ^^* ^^^ ^^i ^t^ ^^^ ^#^ ^^^ ^^i ^e^ ^^^ ^^^ ^f^ ^1^ *^^^ *^^^ ^T* ^^^ ^4^ ^^V < 

WHY DO I NEED A GOLDEN BOOK VALUE CARD? 

The merchants in the directory have been carefully selected and are 
dedicated to serving you. If you're new in town, A GOLDEN BOOK could 
save you many steps, if you're a past resident, you'll find many interesting 
places that you may never have tried before. You need a Value Card if 
you're interested at all in saving money. 

t» ^^ ^|^ +A* +^>%^ «vL« »X» *& ^X^ % ^ *•& +& +&p ^L*^^ *& ^nV *X^ *X^ *<X* ^X» ^^ ^1^ ^r* *- i t j* *X* -X * "j\j* >jjV * 
^ ^^ ^^*^^^ ^^ ^^^P^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^P 1 ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ *^ *^ *f> 5Js 3^3JC • 

HOW WOULD I HELP BELCHERTOWN STATE SCHOOL? 

A portion of the proceeds collected from the distribution of GOLDEN 

BOOKS in this area is being donated to the patients at the school to use for 

things that are badly needed. 

Well, if you put that much in the bank today, in one year you'd get a $.75 
return. But if you put it in an envelope with your name and address and 
mail it to 39 Main St. in Northampton, you could make a return of several 
hundr e d dollars 

^^frfoftut?******************** 

Skeptical, eh? Well how does an UNCONDITIONAL MONEY BACK 
GUARANTEE sound? if you become a member of the Golden Book of 
Values Plan and do not save money by using your Value Card, we'll give 

"THE MONEY YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN" 



G0LDENB00K 
OF VALUES" 




Sounds like a good idea Send me 
one of those Golden Books - But 
if I don't save money please 
return my $15 as promised. 



flame 
Address 



City 



Zip 



Golden Book of Mt. Tom 

39 Main St., Northampton 

586 1349 




It was a year that saw the 
Minutemen rack up a ten game 
winning streak in their late season 
drive to gain a New England birth 
to the Collegiate World Series 
played in Omaha. A loss to Har- 
vard in the regular season finale by 
a 5-4 score and then a 4-2 loss to 
Harvard again in the double 
elimination tournament, followed 
by a 2-0 loss to Providence put the 
damper on the win streak however. 



When the baseball players are 
not playing for UMass in the 
summer months, they usually play 
for some league in the summer so 
as to improve their game. Perhaps 
the most highly rated summer 
baseball leauge for College 
ballplayers is the Cape Cod League 
that features an eight team league. 
Others may play in the tri-county 
league in Western Mass. 



IM Schedule 



RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY SCHEDULE 

SUMMER SESSION 
EFFECTIVE JUNE 25 TO AUGUST 17, 1973 



at bat in one game. He won't be 
back next year but there is an up 
and coming replacement in Craig 
Allegrezza who looked good in 
California but suffered a shoulder 
injury and saw only limited action 
throughout the rest of the cam- 
paign. 



BOYDEN GYM 

BOYDEN WEIGHT 
TRAINING ROOM 


Monday - 
3:00 PM - 
Monday - 
9:00 AM - 


Friday 
9:00 PR 
Friday 
9:00 PM 




BOYDEN POOL 


Monday - 
12 Noon - 

3:00 PM 
6:00 PM 


Friday 
1:00 PM 

- 5:00 PM 

- 9:00 PM 


Faculty & 

Staff Only 

Co Ed 

Co Ed 


BOYDEN HANDBALL 
& SQUASH COURTS 


Monday 
9:00 AM 


- Friday 

- 9:00 PM 


Reservations 
Only 


BOYDEN 
BOWLING ALLEYS 


Monday 
12 Noon 


- Friday 

- 4:00 PM 



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Tommy Can You Hear Me ? 

The $30,000 Dring 



By CINDY GONET 

You see them every day as you stroll through the Campus Center 
Concourse. They are standing alert, relying upon their physical coor- 
dination, quick reflexes and eyesight which contribute to the only reliable 
income producing area in the Campus Center. Their amassing of quar- 
ters and dimes amounts to over $30,000 a year in clear profit. 

They are addicted.. .the same people play in the same spot every day. 
Yes, the pinball wizards are here to stay. 

"You mother*! " screams one wizard as the ball gets behind the flipper 
in The Red Max. With sweat on his brow and tense excitement in the air, 
the tings and the dongs of an active bumper, the sighs of a missed ball, the 
oohs and ahs of appreciative spectators and the bliss of a good score, the 
sensation of the moment is enthralling and satisfying. 

The machines are characterized by their labels; Spanish Eyes, Outer 
Space, Bowl-O, Sky Rocket, Super Star, Expressway, King Kool, 
Lawman.... none of the pinball regulars will tell you which ones are 
easiest to win with, nor which machines give free games. 

A world famous pinball wizard has shot pinball with the best of 
them.. .Zodiac. .3 Million Years B.C Grand Slam-there's a machine. 

If you're respectable, it's easy to accumulate a score of at least 400,000. 

The flashing lights must do it to them.. .they become mesmerized and 
hypnotized by them. They get hooked... Beware... Tommy, can you hear 
me?? 





July 3, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 3 



Smith's Magic Show 
Delights Audience 



By CINDY ROGERS 

An awe of delightful magic and 
laughter filled the CC Auditorium 
Wednesday night as Magician C. 
Shaw Smith and troupe entertained 
a crowd of over 500 children and 
adults. From beginning to end, the 
show consisted of a colorful variety 
of entertainment. As one of his 
assistants said to me at the 
beginning, "It is a magic show but 
really isn't." 

And it really wasn't just a magic 
show. Aside from Smith's clever 



magic tricks were his jokes, 
geared mainly for adults and 
college students. There were also 
some sideshow tricks by his 
assistants, although sometimes a 
bit corny, musical ac- 
companiment, and Smith's six 
changes of clothes which he does 
just for the fun of it. 

The magic tricks ranged from 
simply taking flowers out of the 
air, or a rabbit out of a hat to 
locking a man inside of a trunk and 
having swords plunged into it. The 




C. Shaw Smith performing a standard trick of the trade, the pull- 
the-rahhit-out-of-the-hat/sleeve/hox or something or other. At any 
rate, the audience loved it. 



best trick was when Smith's son 
Graham was put into a standing up 
box. His stomach area was sliced 
by the use of blades then it was 
removed to the left. Another good 
trick saved for the end was 
Houdini's trunk trick in which a 
man looked into a trunk manages 
to switch places with a man on the 
outside. Both of these were 
amazing, but neither Smith nor his 
troupe would reveal the secret of 
these tricks, even after the show. 

Most of Smith's magical tricks 
were done with the aid of his 
troupe, but he also had assistance 
from some of the audience. A 
young boy had half-dollars coming 
out of every part of his body while 
one man's tie was completely cut 
into pieces, but somehow managed 
to reappear in one piece. 

As much as the audience adored 
the troupe, the troupe adored the 
audience and the people at UMass. 
Near the end of the show, Smith 
came out on stage to especially 
thank the people of UMass who 
were so nice to them. I was also 
told later that this was their 
biggest audience so far on their 18 
stop tour of college campuses. 

One interesting note is the dif- 
ference between the adult audience 
and the children. As adults, we 
tend to sit back and pretend that 
there is magic on stage, although 
we realize there is certain trick to 
every magical act. But the little 
children were so cynical of every 
trick and weren't going to accept 
anything on face value. Smith had 
a response to them when they kept 
i insisting that he turn the wooden 
rabbits around. He said, "They 
look like children, but act like 
college students. While I think it is 
good for children to question 
things, it is not until we are adults, 
that we realize that we shouldn't 
always be serious in non-serious 
situations. As Smith says, "A little 
humor can do wonders in this time 
of tension," Wednesday night, his 
show performed a magical trance 
on the people themselves. 



Six More Admitted 
To School Of Ed. 

By CINDY GONET 

After controversy over alleged discrimination against non-minorities, 
the UMass School of Education's Center for Human Relations has ad- 
mitted six graduate students. 

Six new students, in addition to the six already selected before dispute 
arose, would be chosen from the 280-290 applicants who received letters of 
rejection this spring, said Dr. Russell Kraus, special assistant to the 
provost. 

The Anti-Defamation League filed a complaint against the School on 
Thursday when students were denied admission because the University's 
"Affirmative Action" commitment to recruit minority students 
precluded consideration of their applications. 

The 290 letters of rejection dated May 11 were declared "null and void" 
and the University claimed that the letters, signed by Dorothy Loyd, an 
administrative assistant and graduate student at the School, were 
"illegal and unauthorized". 

The onslaught camp when students who were denied admission to the 
Center brought the fact that the University's commitment to recruit 
minority students pre-empted consideration of their applications. Tne 
Anti-Defamation League which was notified by several of the rejected 
students contends that the action constitutes reverse discrimination, 
which is illegal. 

The letter of rejection states that the center could not consider the 
application "due to the constrictive quota for the Human Relations 
Center and for the School of Education as a whole-and our and the 
School's commitment to recruit minority students. 

"Our quota for non-minority students had been filled by two people who 
are already here and are underway in their programs and to whom we 
had a commitment made a year ago. 

"Applications from minority persons are still being processed: should 
you be a member of a minority group and did not so indicate on your 
application, please let us know immediately." 

A complaint was filed by the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai Brith 
with the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and the Civil 
Rights Division of Health Education and Welfare on June 4. 

"The University administration was unaware that the letters had been 
sent out before the complaint was filed before ADL. The administration 
learned of the letter, which was unauthorized, on or about June 8 from the 
regional office of HEW," said James DeShields, an assistant to UMass 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery. 

Only the dean of the graduate school is authorized to send letters of 
acceptance or rejection. That dean, Mortimer Appley, was out of town 
and couldn't be reached. 

Neither Provost Robert L. Gluckstern, nor Dean Dwight Allen of the 
School of Education could be reached for comment. 

Earl Seidman, Associate Dean at the School of Education said the letter 
was "an honest mistake" and was unauthorized because Ms. Loyd was 
only a graduate student and only the dean could make official 
notifications. 

Dorothy Loyd said she had not written the letter, only signed it. She 

declined further comment. 

At the time the letter was written, Ms. Loyd was administrative 

assistant to Prof. Donald Carew of the center. Since that time, the center 
has undergone a reorganization. 

Prof. Carew, who said he had been away recently, stated that he had 
read the letters before they were mailed. 

Thus far, 128 graduate students have been accepted to the School of 
Education out of 3,000 applicants. At this time, a breakdown of the per- 
centage of minorities has yet to be determined. 

Responding to the situation, UMass officials have called an in- 
vestigation and a total review of all the applications. 



»n the Inside : I 
CRIER Quiz 

•Universal Dance 
•Howdy Doody 



see page two 



see page three 



see page four I 






Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 403), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Zamir Nestelbaum 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Sports Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fuller ton 

Cindy Gonet 

Mike Brophy 

Cindy Rogers 




You don't have to drive to get to The Crier office, 
it's right on the second floor of the Student Union. If 
you want to write something for us, just come and 
join Sam. 



******************************* 



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Crier Quiz 




Here we go again, people, with this week's first 
Crier Quiz. Today's Mystery Man is a non- 
American political leader. Hint: There was an 
article about him in Time magazine a few weeks 
ago. You know the rules by now. First person to 
come to the Crier office, Room 402 Student Union, 
and correctly identify Mystery Man gets his picture 
in Thursday's Crier, and immediately is inducted 
into the Big Time. Hurry up, folks, and good luck! 



Here's the winner of Thur- 
sday's Crier Quiz, Eric 
Ngwashi of 429 North Pleasant 
St., a student in agricultural 
economics. He correctly 
identified last Thursday's 
Mystery Man as none other 
than newly elected Argentine 
president Hector Campora. 
Congratulations, Eric! 




Freaking On The 1 5th 

. V.— . • ... -M u;« La tha hocomonr Thro* Have I 



mail bin in the basement. Three days later I was 
mailed to Cleveland, Ohio. 
I then realized that Guru had set up for me a real 



* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



"Go take a flying at Haley's Comet! What do you 
mean? Get to the Fifteenth floor of the World s tallest 

Phallus; aim; and fire. But get jhere! " test tfmy dedication to his true word and of my'en- 

Upon receiving these mysterious words «•*"• £ f n pursuing true bliss. I was overjoyed that 

from my own personal Guru, 1 set out to find their bbw »• f«jj Su-iins for me in mv areat test t 

true mining ^^STSi^SS £** m \TJ^**tt*& " ' ' ' 

aU-knowing and all-perfect ^ ™£"£tena ! J , Drom pUy mailed myself, third class bulk to Ilium 

ftSStaUSSfrfi iSStiS*. Newark, Iherel mLtakenly caught the outbound 

t im^^tPinmfed it down to our New Library train to Racine, Wisconsin. There I cleverly disguised 

JtSS^^S* tS^SSkSi. Once myself as an oil gasket on a truck laden with five 

fnlidetoe fCg closete called elevators, I hit Fifteen, hundred pounds of hash to YazooCity Mississippi. 

ThethSS wffian tumbled and two seconds later Tiring of this arduous ordeal, I took a United jet to 

spit me "ouTSTthe Nineteenth floor. "Whatgives?" I Portland Maine, but I bailed out during the flight and 

fnnoTenUy murmured to myself. Guru had taught me miraculously, Guru be with me, I landed in our own 

the art of self conversation and I conversed with local secretion, the Campus Pond. That Guru was 

myself often in many a fascinating discourse. Upon smiling, I was certain, (but was he laughing?), 
touring the Nineteenth bastion of barbarism I noticed 



several things. One, all the cubicles were locked. 
Two, there was a distinct lack of air conditioning, 
especially noticeable on a 95 degree day. Three, the 
lights didn't work and four, the only cubicle that was 



I limped over to the Great Erection and asked the 
MAN AT THE DESK how I might find my true peace 
and get to the Fifteenth Floor. He immediately, like 
many library personnel, went into convulsions and 



iignis amn i worn anu iuui , me wuy muiuc u«»i "»» -- •— w ■ --- -. — # «- — , -— > : — ™ j^T»T 

open reminded me of Walpole-six by six with four died. But in his pocket was a note. It read: "To get to 

bare walls and a door. Remembering the Guru's the Fifteenth Floor, take evevator to Nine, climb to 

admonishing words I escaped this prison and dove Eleven, take elevator to Eight, walk down to Thir- 



into one of the never ending stairwells 
"AAAGGGHHH! ! ! ! ! " I shrieked on the way down. I 
landed at Seven somehow. Realizing that time was 
running out I looked for an elevator. Seven didn't 
work. Neither did Six. Neither did Five. Four's 
elevator went only to Two which I took. "What the 
Fuck!" I blasted. I raced down to Twenty-one, took 
an elevator to Thirteen, raced up to Sixteen, took an 
elevator down to Three, raced up to Five, threw 
myself into the mail chute and found myself in a large 



teen, ride elevator to Seventeen, find seventh window 
from left, south side, yell the code words; "Com- 
mittee To ReElect The President", smash the win- 
dow and shinny down to Fifteen, and Paradise." I 
immediately leaped into action and carried out the 
instructions. But upon shinnying down I made one 
startling discovery. THERE WAS NO FIFTEENTH 
FLOOR. ! ! ! ! ! So horrified was I by this discovery, I 
lost my grip and fell to my doom, firm in my con- 
viction that The Great Phallus was Impotent! 



1&**##************************** 

Letters Policy 

The trier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be tvped at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
I s ) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The trier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
uvording to the ludgement of the editors. 



Ed Dohert) 



The Truth Behind Waterhole 



By ED DOHERTY 

It was bound to happen. Un- 
derneath all of the intrigue, 
suspense and confusion of the 
Senate Waterhole Hearings, you 
just knew that someone or 
something was behind it all. Well, 
the news was given to me in of all 
places, the third base dugout at the 
UMass baseball field. Yes, over a 
six pack of Schlitz and a stale bag 
of Frito Corn Chips the eerie story 
was laid on me. The occasion was 
my weekly baseball card trading 
session. I had just closed a deal for 
a Sparky Lyle card, one that I had 
foolishly traded away last season. 
As I recall, the exchange included 
four slightly used Reggie Smith 
cards, lit, and a player to be 
named later. My nameless co- 
trader and I were casually 
discussing the possibilities of 
finding something more exciting to 
do on Friday nights in Amherst, 
when he lowered his voice and 
revealed that he had something to 
get off his chest- he already knew 
what former Attorney General 
John Mitchelmess would reveal to 
a startled nation next week. 

Being an above average listener, 
I popped a Frito in my mouth, took 
a deep drag of my Marlboro and 
sat back ready for almost 
anything. He began by explaining 
that the entire episode started 
when President Nixxelrod made 
the decision to enroll in Food 
Science 101 at the University of 
Massachusetts. That ultimately 
led to the break-in at the Waterhole 
Hotel when it was realized that 
Demolition National Party 
Chairman, Lawrence O'Briarpipe 
had a coov of the Student Senate 
Lecture inuicS for the course in his 
office desk drawer. The sub- 
sequent cover-up occurred because 
Nixxelrod was afraid of hurting the 
pride of Henry Kissingass, a 
Harvard man, by taking a UMass 
course. It was predicted that 
Kissingass would take his famous 



recipe for Sauerkraut back to 
Harvard without finishing his 
"Pizza with Honor Sauce." 

At this point in my friend's 
narrative, any ounce of skepticism 
on my part quickly vanished, 
because I could see he was making 
sense. He continued, with a gleam 
in his eye, and described how the 
evidence was disposed of. It seems 
that in addition to getting rid of the 
confiscated Lecture Notes, ad- 
ditional funds were required to put 
the President in hiding, preferably 
at the Washington Redskins 
training camp, with his favorite 
book: "How to Win Elephants, and 
Influence Donkeys." President 
Nixxelrod was even ready to 
promise cabinet positions after he 
was re-elected in 1976 to those who 
helped him. 

Thus some secret phone calls 
were made to UMass, and a hastily 
put together group calling them- 
selves "The Parking Fee Study 
Committee" was thrown together. 
Jack Bigmeadow of the Planning 
Office was designated in charge of 
the group, and asked around for 
some good advisors. His first 
choice was Dr. Gasgauge of the 
Student Affairs Vice-Squad. Next 
he called on Metawampe, who 
from his post behind the Union was 
instrumental in supervising the 
Campus Center Complex, and 
although he doesn't say too much, 
he'll never stray too far from his 
original position. Rounding out the 
high level security group were two 
ducks from the campus pond, 
chosen because of their ability to 
ignore students-an essential 
quality for the job they were going 
to do. 

By now, as you can imagine, I 



was getting really excited, and 
quickly forked over a Rico 
Petrocelli card to induce my in- 
former to keep on with his story. 
He obliged, and 1 soon found out 
exactly how serious the UMass 
involvement was in the whole 
Waterhole story. It seems that no 
carrier pigeons volunteered to 
carry the 220 lbs. of documents 
from Washingface to Amherst in 
one trip. Instead Governor Ensign 
of Massachusetts mailed them 
from Washingface in an envelope 
marked "Scholarship Money." 

Bigmeadow then climbed to the 
top of the library with his infamous 
"Paper Airplane Folding 
Machine"--formerly used to 
process student ideas, and neatly 
sailed all the evidence into the 
Campus pond, which of course 
disintegrates everything except 
the ducks' asses. Another problem 
came up when the Lecture Notes, 
being full of a substance that 
refuses to sink, floated. Panic was 
the password at this point for both 
Bigmeadow and myself. My in- 
former refused to continue unless I 
gave him my entire set of the New 
York Yankees, including Mel 
Stottlemyre. I was heartbroken to 
say the least, but nonetheless did 
as I was told. It was a good trade, 
for he told me then, how Nixxelrod 
mailed up a leftover campaign 
check and told Bigmeadow to 
purchase ten buses to patrol the 
campus, put secret service men in 
the driver's seats, and let students 
ride them for nothing to soften the 
blow for the last phase of the plan- 
the money-making portion. Even 
though I had been a dedicated 
UMass student, by never going to 

(Continued on P. 3) 



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Faison Dance Experience Here Thursday 




The second anniversary of the George Faison Universal Dance Experience will take place on Thur- 
sday, July 5th at 8:00 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. Admission will be free to aU UMass summer students 
with I.D.'s, all others $1.50. 



The UMass Summer Activities Program for 1973 will host a 
performance by the George Faison Universal Dance Experience 
this Thursday at 8:00 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. This year marks 
the second anniversary of the George Faison Universal Dance 
Experience and there should be a celebration to acknowledge the 
deep black impressionistic gestures of warmth and sincere feeling 
that Mr. Faison imparts in all his choreography. _, 

Choreographer George Faison is a man with a message and his 
vehicle is dance. His work is didactic, vigorous, and cunningly 
assembled to make its effects. The George Faison Universal Dance 
Experience expresses the black perspective on history, society and 
drugs. 

MV. Faison, founder, artistic director and choreographer of the 
Universal Dance Experience is a native of Washington, D.C., 
where he studied at Howard University. He was a principal dancer 
with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre for three years and 
appeared on Broadway in the musical "Purlie". 

A student of Thelma Hill, Elizabeth Hodes, Louis Johnson, 
Claude Thompson, James Truitte and Dudley Williams he has 
choreographed for television, the Afro-American Total Theatre, 
Lincoln Center Repertory Theatre, Negro Ensemble Company, 
New York Public Theatre and the Capitol Ballet Company. He has 
choreographed two Broadway musicals, was associated to the 
British director Peter Hall and worked as director and 
Choreographer with the Black American Theatre Company, 
Washington, DC. 

In addition to this, Mr. Faison has designed and executed 
costumes for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre and the 
Universal Dance Experience and the Afro- American Total 
Theatre. 

Tickets can be obtained in the Student Union lobby. There are 
free reserved seats for all UMass summer students with iden- 
tification cards. Admission for all others will be $1 .50. 

Mr. Faison will conduct a public master class Thursday at 
UMass. The class will be from 1 to 3 p.m. in the gym of the Women's 
Physical Education Building. 



(Continued from P. 2) 

classes, and hibernating for weeks 
at a time in my dorm, I had never 
seen the buses, except on one oc- 
casion when I was vomiting Dining 
Commons mystery meat behind 
the police station, and at that time 
I took it for either a Bookmobile or 
a Gypsy wagon. 

The pieces were starting to fit 
now and ny only question was how 
they were going to raise the money 
to finance Nixxelrod's retreat. At 
first I was told that the best plan 
seemed to be to remove every 
other brick in the library and sell 
them as souvenirs, this plan was 
scrapped when it was discovered 
the library would sink before the 
plan was completed. And so, as 
John Mitchelmess will tell a 
startled nation this week, the 
parking fee at UMass was raised 
after an attempt to turn Tower One 
into the world's tallest parking 
garage. 

I was stunned, upset, shocked, 
but not surprised as my friend 
concluded his narration. With such 
a small ROTC unit on campus to 
protect us from the rest of the 
world, it was bound to happen here 
among our Ivy halls and tastetui 
white cement dungeons. After I 
finished off the last beer, gave tii i 
school cheer three times, hurried 
home to my summer home on 
Oedipus Hill, I knelt down in front 
of the altar to the Starship En- 
terprise in my room, and cried. 

But I vowed to do two things, in 
my agony. First, I was going to 
enroll in Food Science 101 if it 
killed me, second, I would never 
again drive my car on Campus-I 
would make Bell's deliver my 
nightly Tunafish grinder. 



Student Papers Still Not Independent 



By CINDY GONET 

Despite all that has been written 
about the growing independence of 
the student newspaper, there is 
little empirical evidence of 
statistical significance to support 
that thesis. 

From the results of a study of the 
control and financing of student 
newspapers Central Connecticut 
State College found that less than 
10 per cent of all principle student 
newspapers in this study were 
classified as legally and financially 
independent. 

At medium independent in- 
stitutions, 5,000 to 9,999 full-time 
students, the percentage of in- 
dependent newspapers was 33 per 
cent; at small independent in- 
stitutions, less than 5,000 full-time 
students, 23 per cent; and at large 
public doctoral institutions, 10,000 
and more full-time students, 20 per 
cent. Several subgroups used for 
the study had no independent 
student newspapers. 

The study indicates there has 
been a large percentage increase 
(not statistically significant) in the 
number of independent 
newspapers in the last five years, 
"independent newspapers remain 
as a small percentage of student 
newspapers. More of the recently 
independent newspapers are at 
public institutions as opposed to 
the more established newspapers 
which tended to be at private in- 
stitutions." 

While many deans and editors 
reported that they thought in- 
dependence would be desirable for 



their newspapers, a much lesser 
percentage predicted that their 
newspapers would become in- 
dependent by the end of the 1973-74 
academic year. When the replies of 
deans and editors at the same 
campuses were matched, a 
neligible percentage of the mat- 
ched-pairs predicted independence 
for their student newspapers. 

This study found no statistically 
significant changes in the patterns 
of control and financing of student 
newspapers in the last five years. 
Almost all of the reported changes 
from 1968 to the present, indicate a 
shift to more control of principle 
student newspapers by students 
and by groups with a student 
majority. The study further stated, 
"there tends to be somewhat more 
editorial control of the principle 
student newspapers by students at 
private than at public in- 
stitutions." 

There are now fewer student 
newspaper advisors than in 1968. 
"And these advisors now have less 
control over finances and the 
establishment of editorial policy 
and are less likely to read copy 
before publication than in 1968. 
Presidents, faculty, and deans of 
students are less important in the 
selection of advisors than they 
were in 1968, and faculty members 
are less likely to serve as advisors 
Presidents, student governments, 
and journalism departments are 
somewhat more important in the 
selection of faculty advisors at 
public than at private in- 
stitutions." 



Staffs are now more important in 
the selection of editors than in 1968 
and more so at private than at 
public campuses. Publications 
boards are more important at 
public institutions. 

Advertising and student fees 
controlled by the student govern- 
ments still reamin as the two most 
important sources of income for 
student newspapers, and there 
have been slight percentage gains 
for both since 1968. The number of 
independent corporations as 
publishers has gone up and the 
number of colleges/universities as 
publishers has gone down. 

Editors report the removal of 
more student editors and 



suspension of their newspapers 
than do deans. Both report the 1970- 
71 year as most important for both 
of these processes. This might 
indicate that the period of most 
intense overt conflict about student 
newspapers has now passed. The 
deans are more likely to emphasize 
the active involvement ot tne 
president and dean in these ac- 
tivities than are the editors. 

Data for this study was collected 
from 188 four-year institutions as 
part of a stratified, random 
sample. Eighty-five per cent of the 
questionnaires sent to the chief 
student personnel officers were 
completed and returned. 71 per- 
cent of those sent to student editors 
were returned. 



1 




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George Faison 

Universal Dance Experience 

Reserve Seat Tickets: 

Free w/UMass Summer Student ID 

All others $1.50 

Available At Student Union Lobby 

Sponsored by Summer Activities 
Bowker Auditorium, Thursday iuly 5th 8 p.m. 




p *«« 4— Univtrsity of Massachusetts— The Crlsr 




He's Here To Help YOU 

. . . f o »„~,u~- ioti nrr»hlpm while a student nr fa#»n 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Farris Heads Theatre Co. 

The Provincetown Company of the Department of Theatre is headed by 
Jon Farris who will join the faculty in September from Case Western 
University in Cleveland. 

With the leasing of the historic Play house-on-the Wharf in Provin- 
cetown, the University has greatly expanded its support of theatre. This 
summer the University is sponsoring a repertory company which will 
present three plays first on campus on July 5, 6, and 7 and then in 
Provincetown from July 12 to August 18. 

Shakespeare's comedy Twelfth Night, Or What You Will will be per- 
formed on Thursday, July 5. This is followed by the well-known musical 
revue Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris on Friday, July 
6. Eugene O'Neill's sensitive character study A Moon for the Misbegotten 
will be performed on Saturday, July 7. 

The Company then moves to Provincetown for its opening on July 12. 

The University has leased the Provincetown Playhouse and is spon- 
soring The Provincetown Company as an important adjunct to the 
graduate program in theatre. The Company is composed of performers 
from Utah, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, New York and Pennsylvania, as 
well as Massachusetts. 

All performances on campus are at 8:30 p.m. in Bartlett Auditorium. 
Tickets are $1.50 for UMass students with ID and $2.50 for the general 
public. They may be obtained at the Bartlett box office or by calling 545- 
2579. 

|WFCR Announces Changes | 



John d'Armand of the UMass 
music department has been 
named music director of public 
radio station WFCR at the 
University, station manager 
Godwin Oyewole has announced. 

Also announced were a number 
of program changes that took 
offset July I. The award-winning 
Spanish American program "Que 
Tal Amigos" will move from fi p.m. 
to a 7:30 to 8:30 p.m slot and two 
new programs will be heard in the 
ea«*ly evening. "The Women's 
Show*' by Janus Adams will be 
aired from 6 to 6:30 and the Black 
Mass Communications program 
Colors'' from 7 to 7:30. The Louis 
Lyons news program will be heard 
as usual from 6:30 to 7. 

There are other major changes 
in the programs after 8:30 p.m. 
weekdays and Saturdays 5:30 
through 10 p.m., and a change in 
the afternoon classical music 
program. It will be called "Pedal 
Point" and presented by John 
d'Armand. He replaces Frank 
Brieff, whose "Music in the Af- 
ternoon" program has been heard 
on WFCR since 1971. 

D'Armand's "Pedal Point" will 
be heard Monday through Friday 2 
to 5 p.m. Other music programs at 
new times are the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra at Tanglewood, at 



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2:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 p.m. Friday 
and 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Concert of 
the Week at 3:30 p.m. Monday and 
Five College Concert Hall at 8:30 
p.m Tuesday. 

D'Armand. a bass-baritone, has 
been a member of the UMass 
music department faculty since 
1968. He began voice study at age 
19 and has worked with Boris 
Goldovsky, Paul Olanowsky. Paula 
Koehler in Vienna. Oren Brown in 
New York City and Amherst, and 
Jennie Tourel and Nancy Carr at 
the University of Cincinnati. He 
holds degrees from the University 
of Tennessee, Baldwin Wallace 
College and the University of 
Illinois and has studied on four 
other institutions. 

He has recorded on four labels, 
inluding a performance of Bach's 
Mass in B. Minor with the Robert 
Shaw Chorale, and has been a 
guest soloist for many per- 
formances of opera and oratoria. 

He won a Grace Moore Operatic 
Study Award in 1958 and was a 
district winner in Metropolitan 
Opera Auditions in 1964 and 1966. 



By CINDY GONET 

There is help out there, believe it 
or not. . in the office of the om- 
budsman. He'll aid anyone with 
any problem for any length of time. 
He is S. Jay Savereid. 

Savereid became ombudsman 
for UMass last September as the 
second man in that position since 
the job was created in 1971. With it, 
he inherited all the gripes and 
problems of 125,000 undergraduate 
and graduate students, the faculty, 
administrative staff, visitors to 
campus, and prospective students. 

The office of the ombudsman will 
be operating this summer to help 
summer session students and 
guests to Amherst. "We help the 
person who doesn't know his way 
around or is getting the brush off," 
Severeid explained. 

Savereid can help you tackle any 
problem you can't handle yourself. 
The problems he usually deals with 
include difficulties with housing, 
parking, food services, financial 
aid and medical services. "These 
students are usually looking for 
some relief from a housing or food 
services requirement or are 
having trouble getting a deposit 
returned," Savereid said. 

"I think there are lots of highly 
responsive segments to this 
University but I also think there 
are lots of places where a student 
gets a lot of fun feeling response," 
said Savereid. Problems usually 
result from misunderstandings, 
personality differences and 
situations where the present 
system simply can't cope with the 
demand. "One thing that's pretty 
characteristic of this place- 
something different from a Har- 
vard or Holy Cross-is that our 
growth has been so big and so 
recent than many things still 
haven't been worked out vet. We're 
still experiencing growing pains." 

The biggest problem with tne 
position is the lack of publicity it 
receives. Savereid said that no one 
really knows what an ombudsman 
is and the function he performs in 
the University. Savereid said that 
his predecessor. Prof. Ellsworth 
Barnard handled onlv 250 com- 

Ms. Toko Named 
Alumni President 



plaints from September 1971 
through May 1972. Savereid 
estimates that he has attended to 
only 400 cases this academic year. 

Because he has gotten only 400 
complaints "its entirely a 'do able' 
job-it's not overwhelming", he 
said. "If it does become this office 
that gets the appropriate number 
of problems from all 25,000 people, 
then we'd be overrun." He 
wouldn't have time to handle a 



problem while a student or faculty 
member is still in his office - or 
deal with the appropriate officials 
in person." he said. 

"One thing guaranteed the 
holder of this office," said 
Savereid, "is that he has been 
promised the cooperation of 
various offices in the University. 
We don't have the right to sub- 
poena records of anything like 
that, but if I call an administrator, 
I get him. A student often won't." 



Lois Elizabeth Toko of 45 Grant 
St., Needham, has been elected the 
first woman president of the 50,000- 
member Associate Alumni of 
UMass. Amherst. 

Ms. Toko, a 1956 UMass 
graduate, served as vice-president 
of the Student Senate and chair- 
man of women's affairs as an 
undergraduate. She has served on 
the Alumni Board of Directors for 
several years. 

She is a member of the Board of 
Directors of the American 
Marketing Association and is on 
the Board of Directors of the 
Massachusetts Society for the 
University Education of Women, a 
non-profit scholarship granting 
organization. Ms. Toko is 
President of Panel Opinions, a 
consumer research company in the 
Boston area. 



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Hey Kids, What Time Is It ) 

During the 1950's, Buffalo Bob Smith and his little pal Howdy 
Doody had more than 15 million moppet sized fans on the daily 
Howdy Doody Show program on the NBC network. 

Now on nationwide tour, Buffalo Bob brings his skillfully 
delineated show oriented toward the young adult to the Student 
Union Ballroom, UMass, July 18 at 8 p.m. 

Well if you watched Buffalo Bob when you were a kid, we found 
our own version of sweet nostalgia in the Peanut Gallery. If you'd 
like to be in the Gallery when the show comes next week, just 
complete in 50 words or less: 

"I want to sit in the Peanut Gallery because " 

The writers of the best 40 or 50 letters will be allowed to sit in the 
Peanut Gallery. During the show, Buffalo Bob will read some of the 
funniest letters and have the writers stand. 

Here's an example of what some of the students have written? 

" I want to sit in the Peanut Gallery because 

when I was four years old Buffalo Bob got me hooked on 

Ovaltine and I can't break the habit." 

If vice President Agnew were here, he would, and if it's good 

enough for SpiroT., it's goodenoughfor me." 

During this summer I've already been on Bozo and Romper 

Room." 

I want to get involved in a culturally enlightening group-action 

involvement-and a task-oriented progressive movement. The 
Peanut Gallery holds the key to world understanding and peace. 
P.S. I'm married. I need two." 

I want to make it with Clarabell." 

Have FUN!!! 

Send letters to the Crier office, room 402 Student Union. 



Intramurals Need You 



Don't let the summer and 
athletics pass you by. For summer 
students, grad and faculty, and the 
general university community, the 
Intramural Office is ready and 
waiting to help you. But it's a two 
way street. YOU HAVE TO 
COOPERATE. . . 

Right now only six teams have 
signed up for Softball and only 
three for volleyball. . If as an 
individual you would like to play 
these team sports this summer, get 
down to the Intramural Office at 
the Boyden Building today and sign 
up yourself. If you don't have a 



team already, you'll be put on one. 
But sign up today. The program is 
readv to start. Time and sunlight's 
a wasting. . . 

For individual sports there's 
tennis, paddleball, handball, 
squash, horseshoes, badmitton, 
and even a bike race. 

So don't miss out on the summer 
fun . GET DOWN TO THE IN 
TRAMURAL OFFICE AND SIGN 
UP TODAY FOR TEAM AND 
INDIVIDUAL SPORTS. Don't 
waste a minute. The fourth is almost 
here. . . 







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Summer Concert Schedule 



Compiled By KEN SULIN 

The following is a list of summer 
rock concerts in and around the 
Massachusetts area. 
July 4-Sly, Little Feat-Cape Cod 
Coliseum, South Yarmouth 
July 5-Electric Light Orchestra- 
John Hancock Hall, Boston 
July 5-8-Little Feat, Paul's Mall, 
Boston 

July 6-Humble Pie, J. Geils-Dillon 
Stadium, Hartford 
July 7-Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Doc 
Watson-Tanglewood Lenox, Mass. 
July 10-Roberta Flack, Blood 
Sweat & Tears-Tanglewood 
July ll-HumblePie, Edgar Winter- 
Schaefer Stadium, Foxboro, Mass. 
July 14- Van Morrison-Tanglewood 
July 16-22-Mason Proffit-Paul's 
Mall, Boston 

July 16-Richie Havens, the Per- 
suasions, Jimmie Spheeris-Suffolk 
Downs, Boston 

July 17- John Denver-Tanglewood 
July 18-Leslie West, James Gang- 
Suffolk Downs 

July 20-New Riders, Commander 
Cody-South Yarmouth 
July 21 -Buck Owens-South Yar- 
mouth 

July 21 Mahavishnu Orchestra, the 
Section-Tanglewood 
July 2l-Wilson Pickett, Kool and 
the Gang-Suffolk Downs 
July 23-EUa Fitzgerald, World's 
Greatest Jazz Band-Suffolk Downs 
July 25-Seals and Crofts, 
Livingston Taylor-Tanglewood 
July 25-Savoy Brown, Blue Oyster 
Cult-Suffolk Downs 
July 28-Judy Collins, Chris 
Smither-Tanglewood 
July 28-Chuck Berry-South Yar- 



mouth 

July 28-Grateful Dead, Allman 

Brothers, the Band-Watkins Glen, 

New York 

July 27-28-Newport Jazz Festival, 

Fenway Park, Boston War, Ray 

Charles, Herbie Mann, Staple 

Singers, Billy Paul, Stevie Wonder, 

B.B. King, Donny Hathaway, 

Freddie Hubbard, Charles Mingus, 

Roland Kirk, Vibration Society 

July 30-Three Dog Night-Schaeffer 

Stadium 

July 30-Judy Collins Suffolk Downs 

July 31-America, Jackson Browne- 

Tanglewood 

August l-Sha Na Na, Aerosmith- 

Suffolk Downs 

August 4-Richie Havens, Michael 

Polacco-Tanglewood 

August II Tom Rush-Suffolk 

Downs 

August ll-Muddy Waters, Leo 

Kottke-Tanglewood 

August 13- Leon Russell-Schaefer 

Stadium 

August 13-B.B. King, Wishbone 

Ash, Swallow-Suffolk Downs 

August 15 -B.B King, Bonnie Raitt, 

James Montgomery Suffolk Downs 

August 18-Everly Brothers, David 

Brom bert-Tanglewood 

August 20-Beach Boys, Loggins & 

Messina, Linda Ronstadt-Schaefer 

Stadium 

August 22-Canned Heat, John Lee 

Hooker, James Cotton-Suffolk 

Downs 

August 25-Joe Walsh-Suffolk 

Downs 

August 25-Bonnie Raitt, John 

Prine-Tanglewood 

August 27-Foghat-Suffolk Downs 



M I 



1 # 



to 



Album Inquest 



Bareback Rider, Mason Proffit, 
Warner Brothers 2704 

Easily the most authentic of 
country-rock bands to emerge 
from the Mid-West, Mason Proffit 
has released the second of its 
Warner Brothers' productions 
entitled Bareback Rider. The 
blending of country and rock music 
seems the target of many current 
groups however none match the 
finess and expertise found in 
Mason Proffit. Their influences 
stem from pure bluegrass music of 
the south and tight R&B from the 

mmmwmmmmmmmmnmm 



north thus forming solid com- 
bination of the two. Whether it be 
banjos or electrics, fiddles or 
acoustics the members of Mason 
Proffit are accomplished at each, 
aptly displaying in their music. 
Marshall Tucker Band, Capricorn 
Records 0112 

This new band from the depths of 
Macon, Georgia can and has been 
consistently compared to the 
Allman Brothers and. In fact Jai 
Johanny Johanson of the Allmans 
plays on the album. Marshall 
Tucker exhibits basically the same 

IMMMWVMMHMeWH 



essentials as the former men- 
tioned, strong lead guitar, piercing 
harp and harsh vocal leads. They 
possibly play a bit harder than the 
Allmans and with more in- 
strumentations, but the similiarity 
is still remarkable. This, their first 
album on Capricorn Records, is an 
array of rock and roll spiced 
throughout with southern blues. 

Living in the Material World, 

George Harrison, Apple 3410 

The eagerly anticipated George 
Harrison album, Living in the 



Material World, hit the market last 
month and, needless to say, many 
Harrison fans were duly disap- 
pointed. What promised to be a 
fresh and innovative work of the 
highly talented ex-Beatle proved 
only to be a mundane album 
pleasantly reminiscent of AH 
Things Must Pass. George's 
musical ability lacks imperfection 
but it is sadly wasted on relatively 
nondescript tunes. Despite its lack 
of originality it is a popular album 
and a panacea for those who had 
long awaited a message from 



Harrison. 

Woman Across the River, Freddie 
King, Shelter Records 8919 

Unfortunately Freddie King 
became acquainted with Leon 
Russell and since has not shown 
the capable talents he at one time 
expressed. Nevertheless with 
Woman Across the River we can 
find many non-Russelled tunes 
portraying King as an improved 
performer, guitarist, singer. The 
album is a good one and would be 
better if Leon wasn't around. 



m 



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Page •— Univtrsity of Massachusetts— The Crier 



CPA Review 



' 'Five Worlds Of Women ' ' 

.... ■ :„ -~a tu "Th^WnrlH nf Wnrr 



Continuing Ed. Summer Offerings I Correction I 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



As part of its expanding program 
in professional accounting, the 
UMass School of Business Ad- 
ministration will offer a Certified 
Public Accountants review course 
to prepare candidates for the CPA 
examination to be given on Nov. 7, 
R and 9. 1973. 

The CPA review course in 
auditing will be taught by 
Professor Anthony Krzystolik. 
CPA. He is chairman of the ac- 
counting department, editor of the 
"Massachusetts CPA Review" and 
secretary of the Massachusetts 
Society of Certified Public Ac- 
countants. 

The CPA review course in theory 
will be taught by Dr Ula Motekat. 
CPA ; and the CPA review course 
in law will be taught by James 
O'Connell. J.D.. CPA Both 
Professors Motekat and O'Connell 
have taught the CPA review course 
in past summers. 

In cooperation with the 
Massachusetts Society of Certified 
Public Accountants, four ad- 
ditional staff training programs for 
professional accountants will be 
offered during July. 

Staff Level I. a general training 
program for beginning staff ac- 
countants, will be offered from 

Mount 
Holyoke 

Theatre 



The fourth season of the Mount 
Holyoke College Summer Theatre 
begins on Tuesday. July 3rd with 
the Woodv Allen comedy. PLAY IT 
AGAIN SAM Directed by Jim 
Cavanaugh. the side-splitting 
farce, tells the story of Allan Felix, 
played by George B. Dash, who is a 
neurotic and "nutty" little guy 
with a vivid and hysterical 
imagination Allan tries 

desperately to cope with the 
frustrations involved in impressing 
the opposite sex, and serving as his 
coach in the matter is Humphrey 
Bogart. played by Paul Wildman. 
Dream girls and real girls ranging 
from a sophisticated model to a 
thrashing go-go dancer appear as 
the objects of Allan's many fan- 
tasies. 

Opening night is Tuesday. July J* 
at 8:30 P.M. in The-Tent-On-the 
Green on the Mount Holyoke 
College campus in South Hadley. 
Tickets, at $2 .50 and $3.50. are 
available through the box office, 
which is open between 10 a.m. and 
9 p.m. daily except Sunday 
• 413/538-2406). Student tickets may 
be purchased at $1.00 off the listed 
price for Tuesday. Wednesday and 
Thursday performances. Tickets 
may be picked up at the box office, 
or ordered by mail by writing to 
the Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theatre. South Hadtey, 
Mass. 01075. 



July 7 to 13. Staff Level II, for 
beginning in-charge accountants, 
will be offered from July 16 to 20. 
Dr. Philip Meyers, CPA, of Boston 
University will be the course in- 
structor for the Staff Level I and II 
courses. 

Staff Level III, a training 
program for in-charge ac-. 
countants, will be offered from 
July 9 to 13. Professor Robert 
Lentilhon, CPA. of UMass, co- 
author of the book "The CPA 
Examination'' will be the in- 
structor. 

A series in Basic Corporate 
Planning will be offered from July 
17 to 20. Dr. Louis Raverta. CPA. 
professor of accounting at Western* 
New England College, will be the 
course instructor. 

Further details on all courses are 
available from the Accounting 
Department. School of Business 
Administration. UMass. telephone 
545-2487. 



"Five Worlds of Women," a 
series reflecting various world 
cultures and the women in them, 
will begin the new WFCR-FM radio 
program "The World of Women" 
at 6 p.m., now through July 6. 

The new program and series 
were announced by Janus Ingrid 
Adams, director of development 
and women's programming at 
WFCR, the public radio station of 
the Five-College Area. 

"Five Worlds of Women" will be 
aired through July 6 from 6 to 6:30 
p.m., with women of 13 countries 
discussing the cultural forces 
acting upon them. Women of Asia, 
Africa, South and Latin America, 



Europe, Native America, and the 
United States will represent 13 
countries, five Native American 
tribes, and 20 cultural 
backgrounds. 

Topics will include: the meaning 
of matriarchy to a Ghanian 
woman, the life of a child born in a 
Czechoslovakia occupied by Hitler 
and Stalin, and the significance of 
Wounded Knee for Indian children. 



The World of Women" program 
will continue each weekday after 
July 6, over WFCR-FM (88.5). 




m 



NOW 



PLAYING 



AMITY ST. . AMHERST 



CALVIN THEATRE 



UMass 

Police 
5-2121 



KING ST. NORTHAMPTON 



Deerfield Drive-In 

Rt. 5 & 10 South Deerfield 
665-8746 



Class 



E 



A *•»«#» Commuwc:»liOM C< 



'•I »»ry ^^^ 



also 

George C. Scott 
"Rage" 

Feature First 
July 4-10 




BLUEWALL 

CAFETERIA 

featuring: 

• Hot Meals 

• Grinders 

• Deli Sandwiches 

• Hamburgers and Hotdogs 

open 7 to 7 - 7 days a week 



AT BOTH 
THEATRES 

EVES. 7:00 & 9:00 
SAT. & SUN. MAT: 2:00 

Meet Sid Caesar, 
"The funniest man in America,'' 



— Eiquire Magazine 




MAX UtfcJMAN 5 






YOUft/HOUl 
Of ZHOU)/ 

SID CAESAR / IMOGENE COCA / CARL REINER/ HOWARD 

p*m»«m»« MAX LIEBMAN MORRIS 



MOV-Tl IS Ml. SI \ IS $1 0(1 
VTBOTHTIIKATRKS 



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Thursday & Friday 



Four evening courses relating to environmental 
studies will be given during the Summer Session of 
the UMass Division of Continuing Education. 

In Introductory Aquatic Chemistry, environmental 
problems affecting natural waters are discussed 
from a chenical viewpoint. Topics will include 
eutrophication; the detergent dilemma; highway de- 
icing; fluoridation; heavy metal pollution; dredging; 
drinking water quality; and waste water treatment. 
The course, which meets Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings, is taught by Robert Pojasek. 

Man and Nutrition covers fundamentals of 
nutrition and its role in contemporary life. 
Developments of man's food habits encompassing 
psychological, social, racial, economic, and 
geographical factors is discussed, plus relevant 
current topics such as fad diets, food additives, and 
the high cost of eating. The course meets Tuesday 
and Thursday evenings and will be taught by Kenneth 

Warner. 

\_ 
Plant Diseases and their Control covers the kinds 
and nature of the diseases that affect house and 
garden plants. Diagnosis, prevention, and control of 



disease of flower plants, vegetables, fruit, shade 
trees, shrubs, and lawns are among the topics 
covered. Meetings are Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings. The course is taught by Mark Mount and 
Chairman Richard Rohde of the department of plant 
pathology. 



Floricultural Science presents an introduction to 
the aesthetic enrichment of the home environment 
with plants. Emphasis is placed on the practical 
aspects of working with house plants and annuals and 
consideration is given to herbaceous and woody 
perennials. Projects in the laboratory include dish 
gardens, terrariums, hanging baskets, dried and 
fresh table arrangements and corsage construction. 
Each meeting is divided equally between lecture and 
laboratory demonstrations. The course, which meets 
Monday and Wednesday evenings, is taught by 
Everett Emino. 

Tuition for each course is $81, plus materials fees 
running from $2 to $5. All four offer university credit. 
Full information, application forms and a catalogue 
can be obtained from the Division of Continuing 
Education, 920 Campus Center, UMass. 



Contrary to what was reported in 
the Crier (in advertisements last 
Tuesday and Thursday) Bill 
Zimmerman was indicted for 
participating in the Wounded Knee 
airlift. However, there is NO in- 
dication that he did actually 
participate in the airlift. Also, he is 
not a lawyer, as was stated in the 
advertisement, but was a 
psychology progessor. The Crier 
regrets the errors. 



Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer lo Yesterday s Puzzle 



A series 
workshops 
given now 
presented 
Education 



of in-depth summer 

in education will be 

to Aug. 3 at UMass 

by the School of 

and the Division of 

Continuing Education. 

The Summer '73 Workshop 
Program is a college of 35 
workshops one and two weeks in 
length and about 100 special events 
sponsored by various learning 
clusters in the School of Education. 
Introductory workshops will 
acquaint school administrators, 
teachers, students and the public 

Notices 

The Baha'is of Amherst cordially 
invite all to hear Nancy Jordan 
speak on "The Implications of 
Realizing the Oneness of 
Mankind," today at 8:15 p.m. The 
meeting will be held at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Waite, 29 
Grantwood Rd., Amherst. For 
more information, please phone 
549-1666 or 549-1212. 

UMass Outing Club 

Today, hike up Mt. Toby leaves 
at 5:30p.m. from bus circle in front 
of Stockbridge Hall. 

Thursday, July 5, beginners rock 
climbing at Chapel Ledge leaves at 
5:30 p.m. from bus circle in front of 
Stockbridge Hall. 

Check Outing Club bulletin board 
in Student Union opposite ticket 
office for further details and other 
trips. 

Equipment locker hours: 11:50 
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday, and Thursday or see 
summer hours on locker door for 
making arrangements for other 
hours. 

Check Outing Club bulletin board 
for summer trips. 

Some of the available equipment 
includes: sleeping bags, tents, 
stoves, canoes, kayaks, carbade 
lamps, backpacks, ropes for 
climbing, jumars, and other 
equipment. 

Locker and bulletin board 
located on 1st floor of Student 
Union opposite ticket office. 
Summer Yoga Program 

The Yoga Hermitage in Pelham 
is still accepting students for the 
summer Yoga Program, evening 
courses. For further information 
please phone the hermitage: 256- 
6298, 11 a.m. -noon and 7-8 p.m. 



with media for the '70's, open 
classroom practices, issues in 
public alternative schools, 
humanistic education and arts in 
the creative learning process. For 
those more familiar with certain 
learning areas, specific workshops 
will concentrate on such topics as 
classroom environments and 
relationships, human relations 
training and group dynamics, 
feminism in eaducation, subject 
areas in the integrated day 
classroom, organizational 
behavior and programs for teacher 
improvement. 

Curriculum and methods wdl be 
explored in various workshops 
including Orff-Schulwerk, creative 
movement, basic human in- 
teraction and global survival 
studies. Supplementing the 
workshop day will be special 
events in the late afternoons and 
evenings, including seminars, 
lectures, films and other 
presentations focusing on new 
developments in education. 

Registration for most workshops 



will be $90 per week for the first 
person from a school district with 
group rates available for two or 
more persons from the same 
district. Persons may register for 
one or more of the workshops, 
which run daily from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. Five College students with 
IDs will be eligible for a student 
rate. One optional university credit 
per week will be offered for most of 
the workshops at the tuition rate of 
$10 per credit ($15 out of state). 

Further information is available 
from Tom Hamon, School of 
Education, 545-1584. Applications 
for enrollment will be accepted on 
a space available basis. 



ACROSS 

1 Kind of fabric 
6 Insert surrep- 
titiously 
1 1 Mistakes 

13 Body of water 

14 Note of scale 

15 Precious stone 

17 Preposition 

18 Snake 

20 Spirited horse 

21 Bishopric 

22 Wife of Zeus 

24 Male sheep 

25 Choicest 

26 Disclose 

28 Datum 

29 Sly look 

30 Den 

3 1 Clayey earth 

32 Second of two 

34 Male deer 

35 Transgress 

36 Let it stand 

38 Beverage 

39 Wild 

41 Guidoshigh 

note 

42 Negative prefix 

43 Buccaneers 

45 Part of "to be 

46 Back down 

48 Landed proper- 
ty 

50 Ceases 

51 More rational 



4 Deity 

5 Goddess of 

discord 

6 Supply 

7 Unusual 

8 Cyprinoid fish 

9 Craftiest 
10 Doctrine 

1 2 Petty ruler 

13 Verse 
16 Repast 

19 Make ready 
21 Conceal 
23 Turn aside 
25 Badgers 

27 Lamprey 

28 Obese 

30 Woolly 

31 Polo stick 

32 Unit of Italian 

currency 




33 Tell 

34 Filaments 

35 Withered 

37 More domesti- 
cated 

39 Tropical fruit 
(pi) 



40 Smaller amount 

43 Vigor (colloq.) 

44 Music as writ- 

ten 

47 Negative 

49 Indefinite arti- 
cle 



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Classifieds 



FOR SALE 

Pioneer SX 770 STE HEO receiver, 20 
watts/channel and pair of LKH 17' speakers. 
J300 or best offer. Call Mark 545 2093 week 
days 

TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 121B 
auto changer, Sony TC 55 port cassette. EICO 
«7 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5171. 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

July Aug option to lease own room in 3 
bedroom Townhouse A - cond., color, cable 
TV. Swim pool close to campus Rent 
')ouof able 

ROOM FOR RENT 
Cumfortabl'-'. quiet, comp furnished single 
rm. Kltch Priv. TV for sericvs Derson, 30 sec 
wal» to Un.v , $80 mo Mart. 7568894, Eve 

SUBLET 

Sublet Crown °omt, 1 bedroom 'st floor, quie' 
De»s oool. warning ciisf , avail, Aug. 1 to June 
1 1171 Ca'i Judy 5 235' or 253 3287. 




Page a— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Summer Gorillas Play Ball 



By MARTY KELLEY 

Amherst-It was just a question of time before the 
early Chactaw Indian tribe of the 17th century would 
get tired of fishing, hunting, and scalping French 
settlers in the North Country. Like most Americans 
even our first enjoyed leisure. And so with crude 
cradle and leather strappings binded into cir- 
cumference, the game of lacrosse evolved out of the 
impatience of the wilds that bore our ancestors... And 
heritage never dies... 

Dressed in scimpy loincloth the inventors played 
for a string of wild horses, someone else's squaw, 
territory possessions, and sometimes to the death... - 
But unlike the dinosaurs, Ripple Wine, and Bo 
Belinsky, the original Indian game has withstood the 
test of time... But not exposure... 

Given from God to the Chactaws the game of 
lacrosse has quickly catapulted as one of the fastest 
rising college sports in the country. The game has 
become a mark of distinction at Massachusetts for a 
free spirited group of athletes called Garber's 
Gorillas. Naturally Dick Garber is the proprieter and 
for 19 years or so he's been giving the game of 
lacrosse the statistics on the Amherst campus, but 
the media hasn't taken the cue... And so it seems that 
the original Chactaws received more publicity. 

And so the game has suffered greatly from ex- 
posure. Although college studs get the same money 
under the table, an equivalent football scholarship in 
terms of dollars n' cents, Watergate gradecard, at 
such prestigous halls of academia as Maryland, 
Johns Hopkins, and Washington n' Lee, still the 



NCAA championships, the U.S.I.L.A. playoffs, and 
the North-South Game are constantly slighted with 
the camera, radio wave and typewriter... 

When the college gold has been harvested, June 
brings a lacrosse explosion on the club circuit in Long 
Island especially in Suffolk County... Believe it or not, 
Amherst, Mass. is no exception... 

Formed a year ago by Teddy Garber, son of coach 
Dick and an outstanding Ail-American prospect at 
New Hampshire, the Amherst Club takes advantage 
of summer Sundays in true Chactaw fashion. Manned 
by mostly local college talent, the 20-25 man 
operation tours Massachusetts making stops in 
Winchester, Needham, Medford, and this summer, 
their blue and white mesh will be seen in 
Longmeadow as well as Lincoln-Sudbury, N.H. and 
Hartford, Ct. with the Conard Lacrosse Club. Garber 
also may go over his head scrimmaging the Boston 
Lacrosse Club and the nationally sponsored Brine Co. 
Club stationed in Boston. ..But talent can always 
suffice for Big Ten scheduling... 

And so if you're interested in seeing what kept 
Chactaw children off the street, local enthusiasts can 
truck on down to the front side of Alumni Stadium on 
designated Sundays this summer to see what lacrosse 
is all about... 

One thing for sure, our first Americans didn't use 
lime on their fields, All- Americans in the lineup, and 
beer and hamburgers in their postgame 
repetoirc.But it's all part of a heritage... And it will 
never die... 




Fastest Game On Foot 



Trivia 
Answers 



1.) Hank Aaron Day 
2.) Jack Chesbro of Conway 
3. ) Morgan G. Buckley, 1937 
4.) Alexander Joy Cartwright 
5. ) hitting (714 career home runs) 
6.) Sandy Koufax of the LA. 

Dodgers 
7.) 1933 
8. ) Shortest game ever played. 51 

minutes. 
9. ) all had three HRs in one game 

at one time in their careers. 

10.) Willie Mays. April 30, 1961. 



Crier 




Sports 



Crier 
Sports 

Hotline 
545-061 7 



Notice 



Do you think you might have a 
baseball stumper that could 
challenge the UMass summer 
community? If so, submit it to the 
Crier office at 402 Student Union 
Building. Any other sporting 
contributions will also be accepted 
and reviewed for possible 
publication. There are many 
different events happening around 
campus that may go unnoticed. If 
one appeals to you. . sit down and 
type it out at 60 spaces and submit 
it to the office. 




■ 



Amherst's Tire Store-- 

Firestone Shell Jetzon ; i^U, 

MICHELIN X Veith JlRELLI 
Le Havre Rodial Tires ■-- Steel Belted 



IK 



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Professional American A 
Foreign Car Repair 



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Amhsnt — Northampton Rood 

B«twe«n University Drive A Stop A Shop 



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John Huleckl (r) is shown posing as one of the 1971 UMass co- 
captains with Dennis Keating (D.-Hulecki recently signed a contract 
to play with the New England Colonials in Foxboro. 

Hulecki Signs 



By MARTY KELLEY 

Professional football can be a 
one shot deal. Either you make it 
or you don't. As a rookie in training 
camp, each day could be your last. 
And with former All New New 
England tight end John Hulecki of 
the one time UMass Redmen, he 
barely had enough time to put on 
his jock strap for the Pittsburg 
Steelers. Released on the first day 
of tryouts, for Hulecki there was 
barely enough time to spell pen- 
sion. 

Looked at closely by Mike 
Holavak and the then Boston 
Patriots, Hulecki was listed as a 
free agent after he played in the 
Serrio Bowl in Mobile, Alabama 
for the Pittsburg Steelers. But so 
often in pro football, you are 
drafted because of your physical 
potential and not your regular 
position. So at 6'4, 225 lbs. Hulecki 
was given a shot as a strong guard 
with the Steelers instead of an 
honest look at tight end, the 
position that he dominated in the 
New England area for his varsity 
tenure at Massachusetts. 

Unfamiliarity cost Hulecki a 
possible pro check out of Pittsburg. 
Downtrodden, John returned to 
finish his undergraduate degree in 
Amherst this past fall and work as 
an assistant coach for Dick 
MacPherson's Boardwalk visitors 
of 72. But football for Hulecki was 
soon to be on the other side of the 
endline. . Time was the only un- 



certainty. 

And soon the tables were turned 
for John Hulecki. Last week John 
was signed as a free agent for the 
New England Colonials of the 
revamped Atlantic Coast League 
and will be operating out of Fox- 
boro Stadium. Hulecki will return 
to his own real estate as a tight 
end. There he was his own boss at 
Massachusetts and just a number 
at Pittsburg. 

John had some pretty impressive 
critics during his reign at UMass. 
Holovak for one, the Boston 
College football squad for another. 
Saddled with injury for most of his 
senior year, Hulecki startled 
scouts with a superb six catch 
effort at New Hampshire in a 
Conference championship effort 
against the Wildcats and a half 
dozen more before 29,000 fans 
against BC in a 35-0 lapper for the 
hosts in Boston. 

"He was definitely the finest 
blocking tight end in all New 
England,'-' complimented his 
former coach Dick MacPherson. 
"If John doesn't make the pros on 
pure talent alone, his attitude 
should suffice". 

The Colonials won't be able to 
match the Steelers bank account 
but they might teach their poteges 
a lesson in professional courtesy. 
You won't catch Hulecki 
vacationing in Pittsburg. . or 
playing pro football. . . 



Radio /hack 

of AMHERST 

318 COLLEGE ST. - RTE. No. 9 

One Mile East of Amherst College 
Where Everyone Meets To See, Hear 
and Purchase SOUND - - On The Go Or To Live-In 



ios - Stereos - Phones 
Tape Players and Recorders 

HOURS: 10 to 5:30 M0N. • THURS. 
10 to 8 Friday 
9 - 9 to 5 SATURDAY 



Teachers: Look At Yourselves 



By SHARON HUGHES 

Despite the bad reputation 
electronic surveillance has 
received recently, the University 
employs it in a noval way-to im- 
prove teaching skills. 

Portable video units have been 
taping the summer classes of 18 
volunteer professors on the 
premise that watching oneself is 
the best way to change behavior. 

The taping is just one project of 
the Clinic to Improve University 
Teaching at UMass. Financed by a 
$590,000 grant in 1972 from the 
Kellogg Foundation, the Clinic also 
trains diagnosticians to help 
faculty recognize their teaching 
strengths and weaknesses. 

Clinic Director Michael A. 



Melnick says traditional methods 
of evaluation often provide 
critiques from students but do not 
offer resources for improvement. 
The Clinic offers resources for 
improvement through 
faculty /staff consultation. 

It has a fulltime staff of 28-30 
including a full-time computer 
programmer, grad students, 
diagnosticians and 4 senior staff 
members. 

Grad students who are usually 
from the Department of Education 
perform day to day work directed 
toward setting a goal for the 
diagnostician. 

The diagnosticians help faculty 
members identify particular in- 
structional strengths and 



weaknesses, develop teaching 
improvement strategies, and 
implement those strategies. They 
usually come to the Clinic with 
experience as teachers or working 
with teachers, and also undergo 
training in the use of the "Clinic 
process". 

The Clinic process begins with a 
faculty /diagnostician consultation 
to define the instructor's course 
objectives. Once the objectives are 
clear, the process of collecting 
data begins. Data collecting 
sources include video tapes, 
classroom observations, in- 
terviews with teachers, interviews 
with students, and a student 
questionnaire. 

Of these sources, the student 




July 5, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 4 







The Dead End Gang 



Crlv Photo/Olb Fulltrton 



questionnaire called Student 
Centered Analysis of Teaching 
(SCAT) is highly valued. SCAT 
consists of 31 statements 
describing teaching behavior 
taken from research sources and 
the teaching experience of the 
staff. Students indicate if their 
instructor's performance is 
satisfactory or in need of im- 
provement. 

After SCAT is analyzed by 
computer, a two stage process 
begins. First the instructor 
reviews the computer data by 
himself then both instructor and 
diagnostician evalute the data. 
Together they decide which 
teaching skills the instructor will 
work toward improving. 

Improvement strategies such as 
portable video units are im- 
plemented. In the case of video 
tapes, the units are placed in the 
classroom by the graduate 
students. That afternoon the tape is 
shown in the Clinic and evaluated 
by the instructor and the 
diagnostician. If the instructor 
consents, students may attend. 

The process continues with an 
evaluation of the instructor's and 
diagnostician's efforts. During a 
final interview, the instructor is 
asked for a written and oral 



evaluation of the Clinic process. 
Dr. Melnick said the Clinic 
definition of an effective instructor 
is based on three criterion: 
opinions of necessary skills, logical 
goals (setting course objectives) 
and a great reliance on research. 

During the first year, the Clinic 
concentrated on developing 
teaching improvement strategies 
and training diagnosticians. The 
Clinic now has 10-12 diagnosticians 
and is expanding its services to the 
UMass faculty during its second 
year (1973-1974). In its third year, 
it will continue to expand service to 
UMass and disseminate the results 
to other universities. 

The Clinic evolved from 
Melnick's dissertation at UMass, 
"The Development and Analysis of 
a Clinic to Improve University 
Teaching". Melnick said he saw a 
need for the Clinic as an un- 
dergraduate at UMass. 

Dr. Melnick extends credit to his 
associates in the program. Dean 
Dwight Allen of the School of 
Education, the principal in- 
vestigator of the project, Michael 
A. Arbib, chairman of the Com- 
puter Science Department and 
Joseph Frank, chairman of the 
English Department. 



f f 



1 'Stealing Money 
Is Dishonest 

By CINDY GONET 

First of all, let me preface all remarks by saying that I'm beautiful and 
sexy and honest and talented, but poor. 

I really could survive by doing a number of things, but I've chosen to 
become the Ma Barker of the dead end gang. 

We roam around the Campus Center when there's nothing else going on 
in the super metropolis of Amherst. We kind of look for a good time and 
make ourselves a good time. 

Ah, I can reminisce about so many things that've happened to me and 
my boys. . .I'll remember the time we were running from the Amherst 
pigs when one of my boys, "Flatface" got so scared while he was picking 
a lock that he had a psycho-kaeate, or faked an epileptic fit. It was great. . 
.he vomited all over the cops and they brought him to the hospital. He 
wasn't suspected of a dishonest act. 

There are about 30 kids with the dead end gang. On the average they're 
about 14 years old, but act like hardened criminals and sweetheart little 
boys at the same time. 

They act like men who know the meaing of life. (?) A for insance is in 
order here, they really dig getting people who walk through the Campus 
Center Concourse uptight. It's their territory and any good looking 
woman should walk cautiously. . .they tend to whistle appreciatively and 
howl, and make a lot of attention-getting noise. 

Aside from their light-hearted enthusiasm, the dead end gang ripped 
off a coke machine the other day. We did it with our triple three plan and 
set-up. "Alfafa" came up with the strategy, he's our future physics 
genius of the world. 

He decided to put one kid at the end of the hall, another kid was outside 
and there were two people outside the glass doors. Three of the gang were 
at the machine. We snuck a crowbar inside and had "Spanky" picking the 
lock. 

As mental strain mounted with the first failure to pick the lock and with 
another tension packed 15 minutes of sweat and anxiety, the machine 
door flew open and everyone grabbed a handful of cokes. 

We threw the cans in the bushes. . .about four cases worth. 

Someone may have reported illegal activity going on because around 
the corner was a cop. . .We all ran through the Student Union, out through 
the glass doors, scared shitless the whole time. Four of us were caught 
and questioned ... it seemed strange because all of the Amherst cops 
have our names, addresses and phone numbers. . . 

Anyway they took us up to the coke machine and another kid was 
there. . .he wasn't part of the gang. . .but the cops grabbed him. 

The kind-hearted police talked to us for another 45 minutes then let us 
go, on our own recognizance. 

Naturally, we didn't take the money. . ."it's dishonest to steal money". 
That's the motto of the dead end gang. . .To have a little more fun and 
financial rewards, we sold the cokes for 10 cents each. 

And how about the time we got the cigarette machine on the 5th floor. It 
was already busted open. We turned it upside down, the door flew open 
and we got cigarettes to last everyone a month. Again, the honest dead 
end gang didn't take any money, "that's not right". 

Then there was the time when we were making obscene phone calls on 
the 9th floor, just sitting there. On the couch up there was a girl with her 
boyfriend, oh, they weren't doing anything, he was sleeping. The chick 
went into the ladies room and came back to find her purse missing. . .She 
screamed for the security guards. 

These enormously big mothers came walking in and made us sit at a 
long, real long table. The big security guards were sitting at the other end 
and asked us questions for what seemed like hours. 

Finally the uptight, reactionary female remembered that she'd left her 
purse on the third floor. 

After being watched constantly for the weeks and months before this 
incident, they left us alone. 

Oh, our little group has often engineered unimaginable feats. When the 
magic show was around, or whenever we want good seats in the CC 
Auditorium, we get special balcony seats in the Governor's Lounge. 

We accomplished this act by hoisting one guy up through the roof, then 
he went down over the door to the balcony box and opened the door for the 
rest of us. 

We've done a lot of fun things together, me and my gang. We've made a 
lot of friends in the Campus Center; Pete, Charlie, Ed and one guy we call 
Slugger, even this dude we named the Phantom. 

I guess we've made some enemies along the way too, but the people we 
don't get along with just aren't cool people, although they do their jobs. 

Well, I guess that's about it folks, and if you see us around, just have a 
good time, stay cool and be honest. 



P»9« 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication o« the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002 The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Steve Tripoli 



Kditor in Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News K.ditor 

Sports Kditor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Mike Brophy 

Sharon Hughes 




Slay in the mainstream of 
I 'Mass life with Sam. Work for 
the Crier - Room 102 Student 
I'nion. 



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Crier Quiz 




(•uess what! Since none of you could guess our last 
Mystery Man we've decided to lay off political 
leaders for a while. Today's Mystery Man is a sports 
figure, and if you're at all aware of recent happenings 
you'll know who he is. The hint is in the picture itself 
(Mystery Man's getup). Don't forget, if you're the 
first person to make it to Room 402 Student Union and 
tell us who our Mystery Man is. you'll get your pic- 
ture in Tuesday's Crier! Hurry, and good luck! 



Here's Tuesday's Mystery 
Man. who unfortunately was 
never identified. He's Giorgio 
Almirante. an Italian Fascist 
leader known even today for 
his loyalty to II Duce. If any of 
you had read Time Magazine 
recently you would have known 
that, but you didn't, and you 
missed your Golden Op- 
portunity. Well, better luck 
next time. 




The REAL Parking Problem 



Obscured behind the shock wave that has naturally 
resulted from the size of the parking fee hikes passed 
by the Board of Trustees last week is the issue that 
the whole thing has been based on for some time, 
UMass' commitment to mass transportation, with 
(hopefully) an ultimate goal of removing cars from 
the core campus and making things green again. 

But the story of how this commitment ties in with 
the hikes is different from the "high" motives that it 
represents. What in fact comes to light is some 
political maneuvering by the administration that can 
only be described as dirty tactics. 

It seems that some time ago the administration 
extracted from the Student Government Association 
a commitment to the whole mass transport/green 
campus concept. In retrospect, it appears to be fairly 
obvious that they got this promise from the SGA 
specifically with the parking hikes in mind. They had 
the advantage in that no one had heard of the 
proposed hikes at that time, save for a few ominous 
rumblings emanating from the Parking and Tran- 
sportation Council. 

So, armed with the commitment they had extracted 
from the SGA, the administration sprung the parking 
hikes on an astonished UMass. Of course, the SGA's 
commitment was enought to keep them at least 
hassled for a while, since they could be accused of 
backing out of their commitment if they raised 
objections. Of course, this is not the kind of stuff that 
you'd have seen if you'd been reading the papers at 
the time, but this is the kind of political maneuvering 
that goes on behind the scenes, where the decisions 
are really made. 

From here the plot thickens even a bit more. The 
SGA soon got itself together after the political 
problem caused by the commitment dangling over its 



head, and tried to organize some sort of resistance. 
Chancellor Bromery, after the mass meeting on the 
parking problem held in the Student Union Ballroom, 
promised to take input from all sides in solving 
the problem, but it turns out that in this case the 
"input" taken from students was even more token 
than it usually is. In short, the administration almost 
completely ignored the voice of the students. 

Faced with the inevitability of the hikes, the SGA 
tried at least to extract from the administration a 
similar commitment to the one which had been ex- 
tracted from them. Surprise, surprise! All of a 
sudden the administration was decidedly non- 
committal on the mass transport/green campus 
concept. After all, why give away anything when 
victory is yours? But a funny question then arises. If 
they're not going to make the middle of the campus 
green, then WHY ARE THEY RAISING PARKING 
RATES AT ALL? 

Again, in a word, it was just plain dirty tactics. 
Students and their representatives were treated 
underhandedly, or ignored. Working people on 
campus didn't get much satisfaction, either. And 
there's not even a commitment from Whitmore to 
show for it. 

This kind of treatment enrages me, and I hope it 
enrages a hell of a lot more people now and when they 
return in September. The time has come to deal with 
this sort of thing outside of the system which has been 
treated with such disdain of late. I only hope that the 
thousands of others on this campus, who are as much 
victims of this as I, will RESPOND. If we don't, our 
apathy will be used against us again in the future, 
maybe to even worse ends. 

Steve Tripoli is Editor-in-Chief of the Crier. 



Michael Ugolini 



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Disarming The President 



*$:*****************************$ 

Letters Policy 



The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(si sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



By MICHAKLCGOLINI 

Although most of our past 
presidents were passive and 
unassertive, the Office of the 
Presidency is still all powerful 
when it comes to making decisions 
in foreign affairs but seemingly 
impotent in domestic affairs. 

For example, Johnson, who did 
more domestically that many 
before him (putting aside 
Roosevelt) passed his civil rights 
legislation with a good deal of luck. 
It was the first time since 
Roosevelt's day that a Democratic 
President had a majority of 
"program democrats". Democrats 
who were willing to back the 
President's program, rather than 
bogus 'party demo c r a ts", such as 
those Southerners who wear the 
party label tor convenience but 
vote against Democratic programs 
as often as Republicans do. Also. 
Johnson had the sense of mourning 
surrounding Kennedy's 
assassination and he pushed 
through several key pieces of 
legislation as "Kennedy 
programs". 

Nixon, however, is another thing 
He hasn't accomplished shit 
domestically, except to cut funds 
for domestic programs that were 
designed to help our deteriorating 
cities. But in the area of foreign 
affairs, of course. Dick is the one. 
Witness his illustrious visits to 
Moscow and Peking And Brezhnev 
coming to the United States to talk 
with Dick. But the real "foreign 
affair" is the way Nixon gets away 
with bombing Cambodia and the 
way Johnson got away with 
escalating the Vietnam war These 
CTfciy men can start wars in far off 
places without our ever knowing it. 
A President who uses troops 
without consulting Congress will 
excuse himself with one or several 
of the following arguments: he will 
say there was precedent for the 
action that other Presidents had 
done it before He will say that he is 
operating under the nineteenth 
century 'neutrality theory'' for the 
protection of US citizens or 
property caught in foreign tumult 

lie Dick used this excuse when he 
sent troops into Cambodia >. He will 
say there was a "sudden attack'' 

(Johnson invoked this to warrant 
saturation bombing of North 

Vietnam V Or he will say he is 
operating under a "collective 



security" treaty with another 
nation (Johnson used this when he 
sent combat troops to South 
Vietnam*. 

Truman did not have 
congressional approval in 1950 
when he sent troops to Korea. 
Kennedy used the Navy to 
blockade Cuba during the missle 
crisis of 1%2 and eased us into the 
Vietnam war by a large com- 
mitment of "advisory" troops. In 
l%ti Johnson sent 23.000 troops to 
the Dominican Republic without 
the consent of Congress. Nixon, 
without notifying Congress, much 
less asking its approval, sent 
troops into Cambodia in 1970 and 
into Laos in 1971 to establish them 
as active battlefield extensions of 
the Vietnam war. 

The reasons that our Presidents 
can get away with this is that there 
is nothing in the Constitution that 
says the President may not wage 
war abroad at his discretion. The 
Constitution merely states that 
only Congress can "declare" war. 
Bill it does not say that a war has to 
be declared before it can be waged 

Another reason that Nixon en- 
joys such freedom is that he can 
evade the constitutional 
requirement by substituting for 
treaties. Executive Agreements, 
which do not require the con- 
currence of the Senate (treaties 
must be approved by the Senate by 
one thirds plus one>. 

For example, in 1968. there were 
">7 treaties made and 226 Executive 
Agreements Occasionally the 
Senate gets a bone. For example, 
in 1970. while Nixon was making an 
Executive Agreement with Spain 
over the extension of valuable base 
rights in that country in exchange 
for a security pact and many 
millions of dollars, the Senate was 
permitted to consider a treaty with 
Mexico for "Recovery of Returned 
or Stolen Archealogical. 
Historical, and Cultural Property" 
(truly, an important document). 

Hence, the State Department 
these days is a haunted house. 
Kissinger is a State Department in 
himself the has a staff of 140 
assistants I. But unlike Rogers who 
can be summoned to appear before 
Congress, as a staff adviser to the 
President, he can refuse on the 
grounds of executive privilege. 

As a means of preventing the two 
problems mentioned-Big Stick 



diplomacy and substitution of 
Executive Agreements for 
treaties, .Congress; could limit the 
size of forces that are committed 
abroad when there is no war 
declaration and require that before 
the limit could be raised, the Chief 
Executive would have to get 
permission from Congress. 

To solve the other problem, a 
standing committee could be 
created by Congress with the 
power to designate those 
Executive Agreements of suf 
ftcienf importance to require 
submission to the Senate as 
treaties. 

These measures are necessary in 
disarming King Dick and future 
presidents like him. The Congress' 
power must be restored if this 
country is to be correctly called a 
democracy. Right now it seems to 
be a monarchy with King Dick and 
Queen Pat at the top Congress 
must become an effective in 
stitution that can successfully deal 
with the problems at hand. 



Michael Ugolini is a 
columnist. 



Crier 



Dusk in Summer 



the trees wake with the brisk 
dusk wind 

while the smell of insecticides 
overtakes 

your next breath of air. 
swallows flying frantically to 
get home 
before night 

while autos speed by with 
destruction unknown 
the stars form puzzles which 
begin but do not end. 
while the street lamps become 
blinding after 
evening. . . 

while the day falls into the 
night 

the shades go down, air con- 
ditioners 

get turned up and the t.v. 
continues 

where it left off. 

Michael H.Bell 






In Defiance Of State Ben 

Selectmen Support 
Amherst Fields 



By CINDY GONET 

(Ed. note: Although many students 
are not aware that Amherst town 
politics exist without the 
University, recent developments in 
a state ban on sewage tie-ins have 
cost 150 construction workers their 
jobs with the Otto Paparazzo firm 
and the Amherst Selectmen have 
defied a state ban on the sewage 
tie-ins. ) 

The Amherst Board of Selectmen 
voted last week to approve a 
measure supporting Otto 
Paparazzo Associates in its bid to 
build a secondary waste sewage 
plant. The Paparazzo firm, con- 
tractors of the Amherst Fields 
project, laid off about 150 workers 
on Friday due to problems 
resulting from a state ban 
disallowing additional sewage tie- 
ins to the already overloaded 
Amherst facilities. 

The Selectmen, in voting support 
of Paparazzo, defied the 
Massachusetts Water Pollution 
Control Board (WPC) when it 
imposed a ban upon further ex- 
tensions in Amherst as of Feb. 16. 
The ban, in effect, called a halt to 
construction in Amherst. 

The town, thus far, has approved 
29 tie-ins and approved six more 
for within the next two months. 

Paparazzo's claim was approved 
after the WPC ban because the 
Selectmen felt it had been unfair to 
reject the proposal the con- 
struction firm had submitted 
previously. The Paparazzo 
Associates received a building 
permit and paid the fees before the 
WPC imposed its ban. 

In a letter of Feb. 16, the WPC 
called a halt to sewage extensions 
in Amherst until the town 
establishes a Pumping Station at 
Stanley Street, an adequate 
sewage line from the Stanley 
Street Pumping Station to the 
Treatment Plant, finalizes plans 
for a secondary Treatment Plant, 
and resolves the overflow 
problems at the West Street 
Pumping Station. 

The present Amherst Treatment 
Plant overflows regularly into Mill 
River, particularly in the morning 



due to sewage from UMass. There 
is no way to determine the exact 
amount of overflow because the 
flow measuring devices are 
stopped at six million gallons. The 
capacity of the present plant is four 
million gallons. 

Added problems resulting from 
the overflowing of the plant is 
improper settling of solid wastes 
and ridding the grease from the 
effluent. The UMass dining 
commons are the main con- 
tributors to the grease. 

Paparazzo claims the problem is 
not as bad as the state contends, 
that Amherst is actually better off 
than most towns in Massachusetts. 
He says the Board's decision to 
support his bid has given the 
Amherst Fields project a shot in 
the arm. 

By this vote of support for 
Paparazzo, the Board of Selectmen 
will build a secondary waste 
sewage plant or a package 
treatment plant like one in Ackton, 
Mass. The state should approve it 
as Ackton has set a precedent in 
this area. 

William Slegal, Director of the 
WPC said there is an increasing 
seriousness of the sewage problem 
and a lack of responsibility of the 
Town in handling it. 

"Every deadline that we have 
given the Town in the past year and 
a half has been pushed further and 
further into the future," said 
Slegal. 

The Paparazzo firm plans to 
finish 18 single-family units in the 
Amherst Fields projects, but they 
probably won't be occupied. Those 
18 units are part of the proposed 
1300 unit development. 



MONEY! 

Paid subjects needed for 
psychological experiments in 
learning and thinking. Come to 
Tobin Hall 427 to sign up for 
subject pool. 



WMUA 



Monday evening, July 9, at 8 

p.m. WMUA's International Music 

Series features popular music 

rom Japan. Yoshio Ozawa joins 

ost Joe C. to play and talk about 

oday's sounds in the land of the 

sing sun. 







Old 
Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST ft NORTHAMPTON 
MftUIMS Telephone 586-3727 

SALE*— 

USED JEANS 2 for '3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 
WORK SHIRTS 2 for $ 2 

USED OVERALLS & 
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PLUS OUR NEW MALE 

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2 for $ 6 
2 for $ 3 







The Crior— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 

| Howdy Doody s History | 

* The Howdy Doody Revival is coming July 18. Time Magazine in March of 1950 described J 
M" Kids, now's your chance to be in the Peanut Buffalo Bob this way: * 
Mr Gallery once again... just complete in 50 words or "Smith, a six-foot 200 pounder, delights his J 
4t less: juveniles by chasing and being chased by the j* 

Mr "I want to sit in the Peanut Gallery because " clown Clarabell, taking pratfalls and getting* 

Mr The writers of the best 40 or 50 letters will be squirted in the eye with seltzer water. To keep * 

Mr allowed to sit in the Peanut Gallery. During the things moving he plays the piano, accordian. * 

Mr show, Buffalo Bob will read some of the funniest drums, organ, guitar, ukuele, string bass, * 

4fr letters and have the writers stand. trumpet, saxaphone, clarinet, trombone, tuba, W 

Mr Here's an example of what some of the students and such novelty instruments and the tonette and J 

Mr have written. the slide whistle." 1*f 

Mr - When I was four years old Buffalo Bob got me ? 

Mr hooked on Ovaltine and I can't break the habit." In October of 1950, with his fans estimated at 10? 

Mr If Vice President Agnew were here, he million, Howdy went into the comic strips. On one jjT 

Mr would, and if it's good enough for Spiro T., it's occasion when a telecast of the United Nations? 

Mr good enough for me." deliberations ran over into Howdy 's scheduled air IT 

Mr During this summer I've already been on time, TV switchboards across the country were? 

* Bozo and Romper Room." swamped with calls of protest. ^ 
"X" I want to get involved in a culturally In 1953, Variety called the program "one of the 2 

* enlightening group-action involvement-and a task- all-time success stories in video." jfr 

* oriented progressive movement. The Peanut In 1958, Smith and his friends celebrated their .£. 
£ Gallery holds the key to world understanding and 10th anniversary and 3,000 TV performances. A .£ 
j*T peace. P.S. I'm married. I need two." Sunday supplement article noted, "Getting tickets •% 

* I want to make it with Clarabell." to the Howdy Doody Show today is rougher than ifc 

If Have FUN!!! ever." * 

jjT In 1947 the television show went on the air as a "Howdy Doody Time" finally came to an end on Mr 

? weekly half -hour program and soon jumped to five American television in 1960, but Buffalo Bob has «£ 

IT days a week. remained the exuberant, talented all-around great Mr 

IT In '48, '52 and '56, "Howdy Doody" ran for guy who created the characters and the show. He Mr 

IT President for all the kids in the United States and performs today with the same successful rapport Mr 

TT defeated all his opponents in every election. But that made his program one of the milestones in the Mr 

^ why wouldn't he with a great platform like.. ."two history of the media. ..and today the American Mr 

v, weekends every week, four scoop banana splits for scene needs him more than ever. Mr 

%r a dime, and three Christmas' a year!" In one So, write your letters now.... be in the Peanut Mr 

« election, he claimed more write-in votes than Gallery. Send letters to the Crier office, room 402 Mr 

IT Henry Wallace, the former Vice President. Student Union. Mr 

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Index '74 In Trouble 

By STEVE TRIPOLI will not allow the optional charge spring, which they contend is 

Problems have arisen in to be included on the bill. The enough time to straighten things 

negotiations between the ad- reason for this, according to Index out, but for the time being the 

ministration and the Index staff Business Manager James Gold, is optional charge is still not being 

which may hold up and could that the process would of necessity allowed. 

conceivably cancel production of have to include the names of the What will probably happen, 
the 1974 yearbook. people who have paid for the according to Gold, is that a 
The Index was to begin operating yearbook, as opposed to the separate postcard will be enclosed 
as of next fall on a subscription WMPIRG tax, also optional, where with the semester bill, and those 
basis as opposed to funding by the the names of the people who pay it who wish to subscribe to Index will 
Student Senate. The Index staff are not required. send a check directly to the Index 
was hoping to accomplish this by office. This plan has yet to be 
having an optional six dollar Index The Index people have informed negotiated with the ad- 
charge included in the University's the administration that they would ministration, so for the time being 
fall semester bill. not need the names of the people the 1974 Index remains in a state of 
The administration, however, who have subscribed until next limbo. 

Martha Not Wanted 



The Senate Watergate com- 
mittee has dropped a rather 
pointed hint that Martha Mitchell 
not attend the Watergate hearings 
next week when her husband, 
former Atty. Gen. John N. Mit- 
chell, testifies. 

But it is understood that the 
flamboyant and outspoken Mrs. 
Mitchell has rejected the com- 
mittee's offer to provide her with a 
color television set in a private 
room if she'll stay away. 

Mitchell's attorney, William G. 
Hundley, said, "It's pretty much 
up to her" whether she attends the 
hearings, and he doesn't know if 
she'll be there. 

One of the points Mitchell is 
expected to be questioned closely 
on is whether he resigned as 
chairman of the President's re- 
election campaign because of 



Watergate or because of an 
ultimatum from his wife. 

Shortly after the Watergate 
burglars were caught in 
Democratic party headquarters a 
year age June 17, Mrs. Mitchell 
threatened publicly to leave her 
husband unless he resign. Without 
being specific, she spoke darkly of 
dirty doings. 

Mitchell did quit two weeks after 
the break-in. Now he is accused in 
sworn testimony of helping plan 
and cover up the wiretapping, 
which he denies. He has pleaded 
innocent to charges of conspiracy, 
perjury and obstruction of justice 
in a New York campaign finance 
case. 

Mitchell is expected also to be 
questioned on exactly what he told 
the President when he resigned. 
Mrs. Mitchell has complained 



bitterly that her husband is taking 
the rap for the President. 

When Mitchell is questioned 
about his wife's outspoken nature, 
he often just shrugs, saying, "What 
can I tell you? I love her." 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 

Rev. Richard E. Koenig, 
Pastor H I MM 



George Faison 

Universal Dance Experience 

Reserve Seat Tickets: 

Free w/UMass Summer Student ID 

All others $1.50 

Available At Student Union Lobby 

Sponsored by Summer Activities 



Bowker Auditorium, Tonight, 8 p.m. 




Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Tne crier ^^ # -■ 

Summer 1973 Gusto Guide 



By EDWARD DOHERTY 

You know, in spite of what you think about UMass in the summertime 
there are still many things to do with your free time that you may have 
never thought of. 

GOING TO CLASS; This occasional one-day-a-week habit you now have, 
can be almost a daily event with a little effort. Such things as reading 
newspapers and writing letters to the girl or guy you left behind can make 
the time spent in classes almost worthwhile. 

STUDYING; Now by this I don't mean bringing your books to the 
Bluewall or the Newman Center (? ) for a few beers. The new library is a 
fine place and if you put in an hour a day there, by September you should 
know your way around. 

WALKING ; In view of the anticipated parking fee increase, it might be a 
good idea to try this ancient ritual. It could be a way that will lead you to 
interesting places-try the cow barns on for size. This activity can also be 
coupled with practice in waiting for the bus, just so you'll have it down pat 
when September comes. 

READING; The mere fact that you've made it this far in the article 
proves you have real potential as a reader, there is more to life than fold- 
outs and cartoons you know. 

HITCHING; If you're a girl, this is a great way to meet new people, and 
maybe even get molested a few times before summer school ends. If 
you're a guy, this can be a great way to feed your smoking habit, by 
bumming a cigarette from everyone that picks you up. 
SUNNING; If you pull your pants down at night, and don't see a dif- 
ference between the color of your hips and the rest of your body, it means 
one of two things, either you've been sunbathing in the nude, or you 
haven't been in the sun at all. Grab a towel, pretend you're at the beach 
and get out there. 

Those activities take little or no extra equipment, and most can be done 
anytime you're in the mood. There are also some other activities that are 
more time-consuming but can be just as much fun. 
WAITING IN LINE ; Try this at Friendly's if you want a quick Ice Cream, 
or McManus' when you want a booth in which to eat your Number 3 
breakfast in peace. The managements of both establishments have 
consented to making the lines as long as possible. 

GETTING DRUNK; This could be quite a bit of fun with the new 
Drunkenness Law, (you may need to use this for a ride back from the Pub 
some night, or maybe just to see what a detoxification center is like.) If 
you're lucky the Amherst cops will pack you in three to a cell downtown 
until their quota is filled. 

GETTING HIGH ; Although this is still against the law, you 11 probably do 
it anyway, at least until someone starts a rumor that a bust is coming. 
One suggestion, if this is your way of having fun: Informers come in as 
many shapes and sizes as joints. 

SHOPLIFTING; This is an old favorite here at UMass, especially at the 
Minuteman Mercantile (Bookstore). You can try this if you don't really 
give a damn about your education or future, because that's what it'll cost 
you if you're caught. 

SLEEPING; Everybody's favorite. This can be done either alone, with a 
friend, or with a group. It comes highly recommended by most people, 
although you can get too much of a good thing. Its not a suggested 
practice for classes or exams, but just about any other time will do. 
SINGING; This is best confined to the shower room, since it may not be 
acceptable to other people. Also fine for bars, weddings or long car rides. 
EXERCISE; The summer is a great time to take advantage of all the 
facilities that are too crowded during the year, especially the tennis 
courts and the sidewalks. 

If you still have not seen something that turns you on, maybe you d like 
some of these items: ___ . 

GORGE IT; Chesterfield Gorge (Rte. 9 W. to Chstrfld) is right from the 
movie "Deliverance." You can frolic, picnic, drink, explore, and swim 
there, not to mention kill yourself if you're not careful. 
SUGARLOAF IT; Mt. Sugarloaf onll6 is best known for its inspiring view 
of the Pioneer Valley. You won't see too many pioneers from its ob- 
servatory, but you'll see a lot of tobacco fields-if you're interested. 
HOLYOKE IT; Skinner Park at the top of Mt. Holyoke is twice « s far 
away as Sugarloaf, but twice as nice, plenty of tables and a splendiforous 
view, its a "must" at least once a summer. 

GRASS IT; Remember in high school it was either parking or grassing? 
Well, since it costs so much to park here these days, grassing is recom- 
mended-its free. The Orchard is a sentimental spot for many people-if 
you watch out for the bugs, horse manure and falling apples you'll be all 

set. 

PUFFER IT; Puffer's Pond is kind of notorious, its buggy, dirty and 

crowded except for skinny-dipping late at night. Its your only alternative 

if you haven't yet been successful in sneaking into Puff ton's Pool 

POND IT; The world famous Campus Pond, smelly and dirty is still the 

easiest place to find a plot of earth to collapse on. In case you were 

wondering, it became world famous by having two more swans than the 

University of Connecticut campus pond. 

TOWN IT; If you're desperate you can walk into town and watch all the 

high school kids act like college kids, and all the elementary schoolers act 

like high schoolers. Town is also a great place to wish you weren't in 

Amherst. m , . 

FORGET IT; If you've tried all this and still wish you weren t here, 

forget it because you've got another six weeks of school left, and besides, 

the Patriots will be here anyday now, taking their wedding rings off and 

playing "Mr. Nice Guys" all over campus. 

May I recommend the following if you want to give it one more try : 
FAKE IT; This one's for guys only. Pretend you're a star for the New 
England Patriots-just make sure if you're white~you don't pick a black 
star to impersonate because some girls do know something about foot- 
ball. 

COOL IT; Next time it pours in Amherst, probably in five minutes, grab a 
bar of soap and a can of beer and run outside to shower in the rain, the 
only possible side effect is Pneumonia. 

STRAIN IT; Your heart that is. If you still smoke and drink too much, its 
a little risky to get out there and jog around campus, besides you need a 
really distinctive hat to be noticed at all. 

HEAR IT; This is a UMass tradition. It consists of putting your favorite 
record on your new stereo, aiming the speakers out the window, and 
forcing your music on everyone within 5 miles of your room. It was made 
famous in Southwest. 

LOVE IT; Still the most popular indoor sport or outdoor sport but aside 
from obvious preventititve measures make sure you at least remember 
his or her name in the morning. 

HATE IT; The Campus Center that is. Ever notice how nobody at the 
Campus Center every says thank you when you give them your money for 
a lousy ham sandwich or coffee. The only place you get a smile for your 
money is the Bookstore, and even there you've got to bag it yourself. 
LIVE IT; You've still got to spend at least one sixth of your life this year 
in Amherst in the Summer. So whatever you decide to do, live it up for 
yourself, because nobody can do it for you. Good Luck ! ! ! ! 







?- * • • • r> , 




trier Photo/Gib fullerton 

The beauty and majesty of the Gorge in Chesterfield. Just watch out for the rapids. 



B 
L 

U 
E 

W 
A 
L 
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E 

N 

T 

E 

R 

T 

A 

I 

N 

M 

E 

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T 



Friday - Max Creek 
Saturday - Daddy Longlegs 



NDSL Dollars 

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 27, 1973 - U.S. Rep. Silvio 0. Conte, R- 
Mass and Sen. Edward W. Brooke today announced that National Direct 
Student Loan (NDSL) funds totalling $712,623 have been granted to 13 
colleges in the First Congressional District and the three University of 
Massachusetts campuses. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program, administered by the U.S. 
Office of Education, provides 90 percent federal funding for an in- 
stitution-based, low-interest loan program, with the remaining 10 percent 
to be contributed by the institution. 

It is estimated that today's awards will allow 1,577 students to receive 
loans at these colleges during the 1973-74 academic year. 

Conte is a member of the Labor-Health, Education and Welfare Ap- 
propriations Subcommittee, which has jurisdiction over funding for the 
National Direct Student Loan program. He was instrumental in restoring 
funding for this program in the federal budget. The Administration had 
proposed termination of this program. 

The breakdown of institutions and grant awards is as follows : 
Amherst College $ 37,814 

Berkshire Christian College 1 ,476 

Berkshire Community College 3,726 

Greenfield Community College 8,173 

Ha mpshire College 36 ,985 

Holyoke Community College 2,626 

Mt. Holyoke College 60,916 

North Adams State College 68,997 

Northampton Junior College 12,749 

Simons Rock 6 > 616 

Smith College 41 . 23; 

University of Massachusetts 

(all three campuses) 
Westfield State College 
Williams College 

Theatre Major Offered 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



335,663 
55,712 
39,937 




Let's see here 



Crier Photo/Zeke Trout 

the campus map says to take a left AFTER Thatcher House and not before it! 



The Female Experience 



The Department of Theatre will 
be offering a special project in 
theatre for child audiences and 
creative drama with children 
during Fall semester, 1973. The 
Massachusetts Council on Arts and 
Humanities has voted to provide 
financial assistance to the project, 
pending receipt of their ap- 
propriation for Fiscal Year 1974, in 
order to extend the community 
service aspect of the plan. It is 
unfortunate that the planning was 
not finished in time to make an 
announcement prior to pre- 
registration, but this will not 
prevent any interested students 
from auditioning and registering 
during the first week of September. 

The project, under the direction 
of Carol Korty, Director of 
Children's Theatre, will involve 
two coordinating companies of 
students. Both will work on 
techniques of acting improvisation 
and stage movement. Beyond this, 
one group will concentrate on using 
drama with children and will plan 
and conduct regular workshops in 
area public schools. The workshop 
aspect will be taught and super- 
vised by Anita Page, the other 
group will work with Carol Korty to 
develop a new participation 



theatre piece for child audiences. 
They will try out the script in 
performance and revise it during 
December in preparation for an 
extensive school tour during 
second semester. The students in 
the performing company may 
choose to finish at the end of the 
semester or to continue through 
the Spring. 

Academic credit will be given for 
participation in either company. 
This plan is in keeping with the 
department's new curriculum 
which will cover both course 
material and practicum ex- 
perience through project work. 
The child drama company will 
meet for a large block of hours 
three days a week, earning six 
credit hours; members of the 
performance company may earn 
from three to nine credit hours by 
choosing to focus on performance, 
children's theatre, playwriting, 
and/or design. The exact schedule 
of meetings and rehearsals for the 
groups will be arranged during the 
first week of September. 

Students interested in knowing 
more details before the Fall may 
contact Carol Korty this spring or 
summer in care of the Department 
of Theatre. 



The Female Experience, an 

exhibition of prints and drawings 
in mixed media by Yvette 
Garayale Wyman, will be shown in 
the gallery at Leverett Craftsmen 
and Artists at Leverett Center 
during the first two weeks of July. 
An Opening is scheduled for 
Saturday evening, July 7. at 8:00 
p.m. 

Yvette Garayale Wyman grew 
up on the West Coast but has spent 
most of the last ten years in the 
Amherst area. Much of her early 
work, previously shown at the 
Leverett gallery and other local 
galleries, was lost in a tragic fire 



Creation 

Antiques 

the finest in 

clothes 
jewelry 
glass 
etcetera 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 



which destroyed her home in 
Orange a few years ago. Her 
recent work is a very personal and 
deeply sensitive statement about 
what it means to be a woman in the 
Twentieth Century, and reflects 
her interest and work with many of 
the women's groups in the area. 
She attended the San Francisco 
Art Institute for two years and has 



shown at the Elysian Gallery, the 
San Francisco Print Cooperative 
on the West Coast, and at the 
gallery in Coral Gables, Florida. In 
addition to showing at the Leverett 
Craftsmen and Artists, she has 
shown at the Graphic Arts Gallery 
in Springfield and at the Unitarian 
Church Gallery in Amherst. 





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one and two bedroom model apartments. 

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Page »— University of Massachusetts— TM Crier 



L * L 



*'V 






i ) 






$ 



Carlos Garnett 



Study Waste 



UMass junior from Framingham 
will study low-level radioactive 
waste disposal and its en- 
vironmental impact under an 
award from the National En- 
vironmental Health Association. 

Perry Hecht, an environmental 
health major in the Department of 
Public Health, was awarded the 
$250 LaReine A. Hatch Memorial 
Scholarship. The National En- 
vironmental Health Association 
selects twelve students in the U.S. 
each year for the Hatch Scholar- 

Pianist \ 
Needed 

Buster Keaton and Rudolf 
Valentino will be at UMass 
Tuesday, July 31, and a pianist is 
needed to accompany them. 
Persons interested in playing for 
the silent film classics "The 
General" (with Keaton) and 
"Blood and Sand" (with Valentino) 
are asked to contact Rose Blanco 
or Joy Harris at the UMass Student 
Activities Office, Campus Center 




r->\ S42b 



AMHERSTO*"* 



Amherst Or. 



ships. 

Jay W. Stryker, radiation safety 
officer of University Health Ser- 
vices, will provide professional 
guidance to this study; other 
members of Perry Hecht's com- 
mittee are Karol S. Wisniewski and 
Salvatore R. DiNardi of the 
University Department of Public 
Health. 

This is the third consecutive 
NEHA scholarship awarded to a 
UMass student. Hecht's study will 
be a Senior Honors Project. 

Ricci Named 

UMass Professor Benjamin 
Ricci has been named to the 
Executive Board of the 
Massachusetts Special Olympics 
Association by the association's 
state director, Ronald F. Arieta of 
Taunton. 

Sponsored by the Joseph P. 
Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, the 
Special Olympics program offers 
sports training and athletic 
competition to mentally han- 
dicapped children and adults. 
Games are held yearly at state and 
local levels and national games are 
scheduled every second year. 

A specialist in exercise 
physiology, Dr. Ricci is author of 
three books and many articles in 
this field in U.S. and foreign 
scientific journals. He is president 
of the Belchertown State School 
Friends Association and a leader in 
efforts to improve conditions at 
Belchertown. 

Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 



AIR COND. 



AMHERSTC^^ 

AMITY ST. , AMHERST 



253 5426 

JSA^UrT 
MAT.- 2:00 



COLUMBIA PICTURES 



Maggie 5mtth - Timothy Bottoms 

love and Rain 

^iwnTHP uuurti r n«uu 



ft An 

ALAN J PAKULA 
Production 



AND THE WHOLE DAMN THING 

AlVIN'.AHGftll Al AN j PAHmA 



Universal Black Force Here 1 1 th 



The Universal Black Force group of creative 
musicians of exceptional talents, led by Carlos 
Garnett. This young, dynamic hornplaying 
brother from Panama, came to the U.S.A. in 1962 
and has made a trail of experience for himself. 

Among some of the top Black creative artists 
that Garnett has been musically involved with are 
the indestructible Art Blakey, the inventive 
Freddie Hubbard, the over-powering Charlie 
Mingus. It now appears that Carlos not only 
reflects the inventive, indestructible, and over- 
powering experience of the above, but has 
emerged with the unique sound of Black Force 
forever 

The repertoire is varied with original favorites 
like the beautiful and moving "Black Love", a 
tune revealing the Black Force of Universal 
Brotherhood. "Hey You! ! Listen to Me" directed 
at the sick brothers and sisters who are on drugs 
and survive by robbing their people. . ."Mystery of 
Ages" about the purpose for existence. "Princess 
of The Ghetto" is a revealing song of beautiful 
Black Queens and princesses who live among you 
and me. . ."The Time has Come to Pass", a 
serious look at "The Chosen People." These are all 
more than sung, they are ignited by the beautiful 
voices of Sisters Ayudele, and D. D. Bridgewater. 
Other tunes are: The Dance of the Virgins, 
Moondust, Epitaperzackeerism, the Future Is 
Ours, Cosmos Nucleus, Ebonesque (a beautiful, 
moving ballad), the Onhk, Uncle Ben & Aunt 
Jemima. 

Carlos is on Freddie Hubbard's Soul Ex- 
periment album on Atlantic label. . .Andrew Hill's 



Lift Every Voice on Blue Note. . .Kenny Gill's 
What Was, What Is, What Will Be on Warner Bros, 
label. Pharoah Sanders Black Unity on Impulse 
label. 

Miles Davis (Columbia), Norman Connors 
(Cobblestone), Robin Kenyalla (Atlantic). 

Bro. Garnett has toured the United States, 
Canada, the Carribean and Japan. Carlos has 
appeared at the Monterey and Newport Jazz 
Festival in 1969 with Art Blakey as a Jazz 
Messenger. . .On Nov. 22nd 1970 he did a "Soul 
T.V. Show" with Andrew Hills Quintet. In 1972 he 
toured and recorded with Miles Davis. He has 
appeared at the Village Gate with Charlie Mingus 
and Art Blakey. . .At the Jazz Workshop in Boston, 
the Village Vanguard and Slugs with musicians of 
the caliber of Freddie Hubbard, Art Blakey, 
Charlie Mingus and Pharoah Saunders. . . 

While gaining Knowledge & Experience he kept 
a close tie with his native roots. . .Which is to be 
heard in his own music when the Universal Black 
Force came together. 

Carlos Garnett's music with his unique in- 
dividuality to form the rock, pop, gospel and 
African rythm accompanied by the singing of 
Sisters D. D. Bridgewater and Ayodele. 

Carlos Garnett's Universal Black Force can be 
heard at the University of Massachusetts on July 
11 at a Jazz Concert which will begin at 6:30 p.m. 
on Metawampe Lawn. In case of rain the concert 
will be held in the Campus Center Auditorium. 
Summer students with I.D.'s will be seated first. 
Admission is free. 



Julie Nixon Eisenhower says her 
father considered resigning 
because of the Watergate scandal 
and asked the family's advice on 
the question. 

"We said no," Julie reported, 
"because resigning would have 
been an admission of wrongdoing. 
And we also felt that he was the 
man for the job. He had started 
things and needed to finish them." 
The President's younger 
daughter observes her 25th bir- 
thday Thursday. She is celebrating 
with her family here at the 
Western White House. 

In an interview, Julie said the 
discussions took place at Camp 
David on the weekend after 
President Nixon made his April 30 
radio television speech on the 
Watergate affair. At that time he 
announced the resignations of his 
two top aides, H.R. Haldeman and 
John D. Erlichman, and the firing 
of his counsel, John W. Dean III. 
Julie said Nixon played "devil's 
advocate." She said her father 
"who loves this country and would 
do anything for it," raised the 
question of resignation and 
whether it would be better for the 
country and help heal the wounds 
faster. 

Julie said she believes that 
"events are going to vindicate" the 
President and expressed concern 
over the "negative atmosphere" 
created by Watergate. 

She defended her father, as she 
has in a series of public ap- 
pearances in recent months, 
saying "I think he was just really 
in the dark" about the burglary of 
the June 17, 1972 Democratic 
National Committee and the 
subsequent coverup. 

Julie said her father failed to 
discover something was wrong 
months ago because "he just had 
complete faith in everyone around 
him. I guess that's part of the 
whole tragedy of this thing." 

Nixon's problems came because 
he didn't run his own campaign in 
1972, Julie said. 

"He didn't keep close tabs on the 
whole thing," she said. "One of the 
real tragedies of Watergate is that 
the campaign organization is 



Julie Defends Dad 



getting a black eye" and so many 
good, hard-working people "are 
brought down too." 

Julie said she decided to continue 
her busy schedule despite 
Watergate because she wants to be 
part of her father's administration 
and talk about his programs. 

She said her father's mood at the 
Western White House was "very 
good. . He's moving ahead." 
Nixon has been able to get in some 
swimming and walking on the 
beach with his family while here. 

Julie said the idea of a political 
enemy list is "so ludicrous . . 
because everyone knows who's 
opposed to the administration and 
who's a friend. Writing about this 
just makes it sound so un- 
derhanded. I just don't feel it's fair 
representation because I know my 
father and the kind of man he is. 
And he's not that way. He's too 
busy to be consumed with petty 
paranoid concerns." 

Responding to criticism over 
government expenditures of some 
$1.3 million on Nixon's California 
and Florida homes, Julie said 
other* presidents had similar 
amounts spent on their homes. 

"President Kennedy had three 
homes and I'm sure that must have 
added up to more," she said. 

Julie said she thinks the press 
and the American people "should 
be disturbed at the whole idea of 
burglary and coverup." 

"What disturbs me greatly," 
said the President's daughter, is 
that "the press made a hero of 
Daniel Ellsberg. He stole 
documents. It was a question of 
national security and that could 
have much greater consequences 
than bugging the Democratic 
national hadquarters. . ." 

"What's really sad is that 
Watergate in a way is the result of 
government being so big, so much 
power in the presidency. Govern- 
ment gets bigger and bigger. But 
this administration did try to really 
make a start ... "T'his ad- 
ministration has really, sincerely 
tried to make government less 
centralized, less powerful." 

As examples of the effort, Julie 
cited Nixon's revenue-sharing 



proposals and attempts to move 
more decision making to the state 
and local levels. Julie reported 
some of the lighter side of the 
Nixon family. 

She told how they got real delight 
out of Soviet leader Leonid I. 
Brezhnev's visit to their San 
Clemente home. "We all get in and 
tested Tricia's bed after Brezhnev 
slept there" and now consider it 
"really very historical." 

Julie was born in Washington, 
July 5, 1948, during her father's 
first term in Congress. 



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Lunch Special $1.25 
Dinner Special $2.00 

Many other Dishes 
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Hours: Mon,Tues,Thurs 12-10 p.m. 
Fri. & Sat. Noon-Midnight 
Sun 4-10 p.m. Closed Wed. 






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MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES ALL SEATS SI 00 



Let's Make Love 



"Cromwell" 

and W.C. Fields in "The Great McGonicl<' 

July 10th - C.C. Auditorium - FREE 



with Marilyn Monroe 



Tonight, July 5th, 7:30 and 9:30 SUB 



Many of the young men who fled 
to Canada rather than submit to 
the draft may be innocent of any 
crime but don't know it, says a 
Hartford lawyer who has both 
defended and prosecuted draft 
evasion cases. 

"There are probably a lot of 
innocent people up there in 
Canada," Paul Sherbacow, a 
former assistant U.S. attorney, 
said in a recent interview. 

"Based on past case experience, 
a substantial number of these men 
would not face any real threat of 
successful prosecution. My guess 
is that nationally less than 10 per 
cent of the Justice Department's 
cases have been concluded by a 
conviction," he added. 

Sherbacow said many men who 



How To Screw Up 
A Moth's Sex Life 

For the female moth in search of a male, getting the message across 
takes just a little breeze. 

However scientists have found a new scent which they hope will foul the 
romantic air. 

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station has been studying 
the sex life of gypsy moths to inhibit mating and reduce the population of 
the leafeating bug. The moth defolitated thousands of acres of woodland 
in recent years, especially in the Northeast. 

The assure of the female, says Dr. Charles Doane, is caused by a 
chemical substance she emits into the air. 

"Before she lays eggs, the female gypsy moth must attract a male, 
which may be some distance away," said Dr. Doane. "He has to come to 
her-she doesn't fly." 

"She faces a problem in communication," he continued. "And she 
resolves it by producing a chemical attractive to males, and emits this at 
an appropriate time." 

"With its antennae the male detects the chemical lure, which en- 
tomologists call a sex attractant, and flutters upwind to the source, where fled the country to avoid the jiraf t 
mating occurs," he said. 

The sex attractant has been synthesized by scientists, Dr. Doane ex- 
plained, and is used to lure and study male moths. 

"Recently we have learned more about the chemical message tran- 
smitted from females, and we have been able to duplicate a natural 
inhibitor of mating, which is a building block in the synthesis of the sex 
attractant," he said. 

Dr. Doane and Dr. Ring Carde will conduct a large test of this inhibitor 
in July to see if it can effectively stop mating. 

"We will put about ten virgin females on open stakes in a grid pattern 
over about one-eighth of an acre," he said. 

"The inhibitor will be sprayed in the area, permeate the air and 
hopefully cause the males to fly away immediately without mating." 

Females who do not mate die shortly afterwards, he said. 

A smaller experiment conducted last year, in which the females were 
confined in traps, proved very effective, and Dr. Doane raid he is op- 
timistic about the use of the inhibitor in large open areas. 

"If this experiment is successful, we will try it next year over areas of 
10 acres or more," he said. 

The cost of the inhibitor, he noted, is high because it is being made in 
small quantities by highly-specialized scientists. 

"But if a volume production could be developed the price should drop 
considerably," he said. "It would cost perhaps $30 to $40 a gram." 

A gram, he said, could cover from one-half an acre to an acre or more. 



The Critr— University of Massachusetts— Page f 



Some Evaders May Be Innocent 



Washington. 

"The President has injected 
himself very personally into this 
and has said he is firmly against 
amnesty," he said. "That policy is 
subject to change." 

U.S. Attorney Stewart Jones said 
the formal expiration of the draft 
July 1 would not affect pending 
draft cases. 

"Until we're instructed other- 



wise, we plan to go ahead as best 
we can," said Jones, who 
estimates the number of "indicted 
fugitives" from Connecticut at 
between 75 and 150. 

"We will try to eliminate as 
many as we legitimately can. If a 
boy who left couldn't have passed 
the induction physical anyway, for 
instance, we won't prosecute," he 
said. 



Smog Device Will 
Eat More Gas 



A consultant to the National 
Academy of Sciences says a 
go*£C£naent,. pUn tp require 
catalytic converters on cars will 
waste huge amounts of gasoline 
and the funds of car owners. 

"Catalytic coverters will ob- 
viously help in the Los Angeles 
area and a few other metropolitan 
communities," Dr. Maurice Nelles 
said in an interview Tuesday. "But 
for 99 per cent of the geographical 
area of the United States they are a 
complete waste of natural 
resources and funds." 

Nelles, of La Jolla, Calif., is a 
former research director at 
Technicolor Corp. and Borg- 
Warner Corp. He was hired as an 
expert by the academy committee 
studying motor vehicle emissions. 

Of catalytic converters, which 
chemically transform poisonous 
emissions into harmless gases, 
Nelles said: 

"I think the air pollution battle is 
being won without it. With the right 
kind of engine, we certainly don't 
need them." 

He said catalytic converters 
would ultimately cost 100 million 
U.S. motorists an average of $200 a 
year, including the added fuel 
burned by engines equipped with 



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the devices. He said the converters 
will require 15 to 20 per cent more 
fuel. 



were victims of procedural 
mistakes. 

"The law in the area of con- 
scientious objection changed so 
radically over the past five years 
that local Selective Service boards 
couldn't keep up with it," he said. 
"Some boards made mistakes." 
Karl Fleischmann, a law partner 
of Sherbacow's who also has 
handled draft cases, agrees that 
many draft boards made 
procedural errors. 

"The consequence of the failure 
of a draft board to follow lawful 
procedures is that an induction 
order which it issued may 
nevertheless be invalid," Fleisch- 
mann said. 

"What's required in every case 
is for the registrant who is in doubt 
about his status to have his own file 
carefully reviewed by someone 
familiar with Selective Service 
law." 

Young men who are in Canada 
and do not want to return, Fleisch- 
mann said, could authorize their 
parents to receive a copy of their 
file from their local board. 

"The parents would then be in a 
position to seek legal advice on 
their son's status," he said. 

Fleischmann said he thought the 
handling of these cases depended 
in part on political events in 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Yesterday's Puzile 



ACROSS 



1 



Uninteresting 
persons 
6 Collect 

11 Ambassador 

12 Wing-tooted 

14 Negative prefix 

15 Pierce 

17 Speed contest 

18 Goal 

20 Make amends 

23 Pedal digit 

24 Designating 

certain tides 
26 Cubic meter 

28 A state (abbr.) 

29 Later 

31 Harbingers 
33 Short jacket 

35 Portion of 

medicine 

36 Chastises 
39 Showed TV 

program once 
more 

42 Teutonic deity 

43 Is fond of 

45 Rail bird 

46 Swiss river 
48 Nerve net- 
works 

50 Prefix: three 

51 Former Russian 

ruler 
53 Dispatched 

55 Negative prefix 

56 Calm 

59 Provisions 

61 Part of for- 

tification 

62 Puff up 



4 Girl's name 

5 Chairs 

6 Cooled lava 

7 1.050 (Roman 
number) 

8 Ventilate 

9 Quarrel 

10 Following first 

1 1 Climbing plant 
13 Acts 

16 Two together 
19 Latin for 
"mother" 

21 Want 

22 Mistake 

25 Part of flower 

27 Mollifies 

30 Moving part of 
motor 

32 European dor- 
mouse 

34 Field of granu- 
lar snow 




36 Whips 

37 Rubber on pen- 

cil 

38 Places 

40 Gratify 

4 1 Metal fasteners 
44 Strainer 

47 Unusual 
49 Dye plant 



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54 Chinese 
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57 A continent 

(abbr.) 

58 Printer's 

measure 
60 Symbol for 
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2 King of Bashan 

3 Ethiopian title 



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Page 8— University of Massachusetts— TheCrier 



WELCOME 

NEW ENGLAND 

PATRIOTS 

1973 CAMP 



Mike Brophy 



Lazy Day 



There used to be a time when life on the UMass campus during the 
summer months was bursting at the seams with swing shifters and 
regular summer students. And in addition to the regularly scheduled 
activities on campus, many used to cut a class or two on a hot day and 
jaunt on down to the Gladchuk practice fields north of the stadium to 
watch the pride of New England football, Jim Plunkett, prepare to set out 
in quest of a divisional crown. 

The Pats first came to town in the early 60's when Alumni Stadium was 
still swampland and the teams of Fusia's Redmen played their grid game 
on a field where Haigis Mall now sits. The bleachers that are now a 
building called Whitmore were full of roaring UMies as the team of the 
new AFL showed up in town under the leadership of Coach Clive Rush and 
captain Gino Capelletti. 

Times have changed and the football leagues have merged into one and 
the coaches have come and gone, like water through a strainer, and a 
man of Oklahoma deity blood has arrived from his Ozark flight that 
brought him to Logan. His job is to be a tough one to fulfill as he has his 
share of discontented fans in New England, not to mention a trigger 
happy Board of Trustees. Yes, if the man cannot do the job he'll be out on 
the streets looking for a new post. 

All in all though, the Pats are hoping to build a new image this summer. 
. the image of a winner. And it is a cinch that all parties concerned have 
the same thoughts on their minds. 

The Pats will be practicing daily at 10 and 3:40 with the rest of their 
time spent either in bed or attending meetings that concern the overall 
Fairbanks game plan. For any student who cannot hack attending class 
on the hot July afternoons and would rather see a Jim Plunkett or John 
Tarver perform and possibly grant an autograph, then Alumni Stadium is 
as good as place as any to catch a few rays and possibly a stray pigskin. 

They really do appreciate seeing the "finest fans in the East" out to 
watch "their team" practicing. So if you have time to kill, bring along 
your autograph book and have a ball. 




WMUA Revamping Production Studio 




WML A Program Director Tom Jodka looks over the station's production studio, presently torn up in 
the process of being revamped. 



Dick Cummings, shown in action against Cornell in the 1972 pre-season scrimmage which Cornell won, 
3-0, in the closing seconds. Cummings will get a shot at making the Pats' backfield unit. 



Cummings: New Pats Back?! Crier I Baseball 



Trivia 
Quiz 



By MIKE BROPHY 

Dick Cummings, 1972 UMass 
fullback and the man responsible 
for clearing out many a roadblock 
in Paul Metallo's path enroute to 
TD's, will don a Patriot uniform 
starting Saturday as the New 
England Patriots open their 1973 
training camp. 

Overlooked in the last NFL 
player draft, Cummings finally 
reached an agreement with the 
Pats front office and signed as a 
free agent. He will be facing some 
very tough competition as there 
are 23 candidates out for the 
running back slots and of the 
candidates there is the one and 
only Sam "Bam" Cunningham. He 
will be detained in reporting to the 
Amherst camp as he is to play in 
the All-star game in Chicago later 
this month. 

Perhaps Cummings' finest 
collegiate performance came in 
the season finale against Boston 
College where he took out two 
linebackers on a right end sweep to 
clear the path for Metallo during 
the onslaught that saw the Min- 
temen romp to a 28-7 victory that 
stunned many followers of college 
football The Red Machine then 
trained in the mud and snow for a 
bowl game that would be played in 
Convention Hall in Atlantic City. 
Every day, "Crickett" Cummings 
was out in the weather conditions 
training in preparation to show the 
Aggies of UCal-Davis what 
Massachusetts football was all 



about. 

For Cummings, this is the 
chance he has always been 
working for. How many people do 
you know of that haul a VW around 
by a pair of two-inch ropes that are 
fastened around his moose-like 
shoulders? That is what Cummings 
did while preparing for football at 
UMass and again this summer in 
preparation for ball starting this 
Saturday. He played his high 



school ball at Mt. Grey lock High 
School in Shelburne Falls. Mass. 
and was the roughest blocking 
back in Western Mass. "My chance 
to make it big has finally arrived 
and I have to do the best I can... or 
else." said Cummings of his 
outlook for making the squad. 

He did manage to make it 
through the first cuts at rookie 
camp and that is a "big plus". 





July 10, 1973 



ITS 

University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 5 



'Ziggerat' Into Phase II 



Baseball Standings 

AMERICAN NATIONAL 



Eastern Division 



Eastern Division 



New York 

Baltimore 

Milwaukee 

Detroit 

Boston 

Cleveland 



W L 

45 33 Chicago 

37 33 St. Louis 

38 37 Pittsburgh 

39 38 Philadelphia 
36 36 Montreal 

27 50 New York 



W L 

47 33 

37 38 

36 38 

36 40 

34 39 

33 40 



Sports 

SPORTS 
HOTLINE 

545-0617 



I.) Name the first five pitchers in 

the American League to win 

twenty or more games in one 

season. Also state the year in 

which they did it. 

2.) Which pitcher has given up the 

most earned runs in one season and 

when? 

3.) Who gave up the most runs in 

one game and how many were 

given up? 

4.) What was "The Babe's" real 

name? 

5. ) Who has won the most games as 

a pitcher in his career? 

6.) Who has the lowest lifetime 

ERA Hint: He is still active. 



Amherst s Tire Store-- 

f"./1 Firestone Shell Jetzon 

l»^j MICHELIN X Veith HWKR 'W 
Le Havre Radial Tires Steel Bel'ed 




* 



By CINDY GONET 

Will the university ever build its 
tower to the sky, its "ziggerat" to 
the heavens? The Planning Office 
at Munson is hoping to reach Cloud 
9 in the construction of Phase 2 of 
the Graduate Research Center. 

Mr. Jack Littlefield, director of 
the office, said projected Phase 2 of 
the Research Center will include 
two sister towers adjoining the 17- 
story building nearly completed. 

Construction of Phase 1 was 
begun in May 1968 by general 
contractors D. O'Connell's Sons, 
Inc. The Phase 1 building complex 



consists of a computer wing, 
physical science library, 
chemistry, the first tower, and a 
service building. The departments 
housed include Chemistry, 
Biochemistry and Polymer 
Science. 

The 17-story pillar is primarily a 
lab building. The completion date 
was December 1972. 

O'Connell's Sons was the low 
bidder for. the complex at $18.8- 
m ill ion. Federal funds contributed 
were $3.5-million state aid 
donations met the remaining $15.3- 
million. 



Western Division 



Western Division 



Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 



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Minnesota 

Chicago 

California 

Kansas City 

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39 33 San Francisco 

38 34 Houston 

39 35 Cincinnati 
42 38 Atlanta 
25 46 San Diego 



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Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

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Photo of architect's model showing phase II of the Graduate 
Research Center. 



The planned completion of the 
two towers in Phase 2 was 
January, 1975, Littlefield told 
MDC. He went on to say that the 
Center would most likely be the 
last major construction on cam- 
pus. 

O'Connell's Sons, who also 
contracted Phase 2, bid low at 
$11.5-million. All funds came from 
state taxes. This phase included 
additional physics labs, but mainly 
offices and classrooms. The area 
covered by the completed project 
is 482,000 gross square feet. 

Parking for the area has not been 
determined. The Parking Council 
has reviewed the situation and 
hopes to expand all areas to the 
periphery of campus. 

Phasing in architecture is a 
relatively new concept. This 
procedure saves taxpayers money 
in that all utility connections are 
built into the primary phase of 
construction. When there is need of 
additional space, phases are added 
onto the major sites; thereby 
avoiding costly heating and pipe 
installation. The phasing process 
of architecture should allow the 
first part of the complex to look 
complete without additions. 

The architects of both phases are 
Campbell, Aldrich & McNulty. 
These creators have also designed 
SBA and Whitmore Administration 
Building. 



Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 



By STEVE TRIPOLI 

If you have any idea what WMUA's production studio looked like prior 
to the 4th of July, you'd be more than a little surprised if you were to walk 
over there today to see nothing but four walls with a bunch of wires 
sticking out of them. 

What the people at MUA are up to, especially Andy Leckart and Gary 
McAuliffe, is a revamp of the studio, putting all the equipment in the 
production studio into modular assemblies, which are something like 
cabinets. The modular assembly setup will allow the production studio to 
be moved in a clean, efficient say, if and when it does move. 

"We're not changing around any major equipment," says Leckart, 
although they are adding some "modifications" to the main console. Talk 
shows are engineered and public service announcements are produced 
from that console. 

When asked if MUA was contemplating a move in the near future, 
Leckart responded that at present it's only a "dream". 

"We'd give anything to get out of here now," said Leckart, "with the 
power that this station has and the kind of audience we have we could 
easily use 200% more operating room than we have now." 

What's keeping MUA from moving now is simply a matter of dollars 
and cents. Leckart estimated that it would cost from forty to sixty 
thousand dollars for the station to move. MUA could have had space in 
the Student Union, and it was approximately the extra 200% that Leckart 
says is needed, but the funds just weren't there. 
S The cost of the present revamp, according the Leckart and McAuliffe, 

5 is about $4,000, which is coming out of capital equipment bought in the 
1 last two years out of MUA's budget. The budget, which totals about 
a $50,000 a year, comes from Student Activities Tax funds. 

§ The projected completion date for the work going on now is "sometime 
| in September," according to Leckart. McAuliffe thinks that it can be 
" completed by the time school opens in the fall only "if we work all night a 
slot of nights." 

6 When asked how MUA is handling its talk shows and the production of 
public service announcements without its studio, Leckart responded that 
they were "suffering" a lot at present, but were finding ways to im- 
provise from the news room and master control area, located just next to 
the torn out production studio. 

So at least for the time being most of UMass' own radio station looks 
like it's been hit by a cyclone, and it'll be that way for at least a couple of 
months. But the operation of the station hasn't been disturbed, so fear 
not. What your eyes can see at WMUA fortunately won't affect what your 
ears hear. 

Trustees Pass 
Parking Hikes 

By BILL DENSMORE 

BOSTON-The University of Massachusetts trustees last Monday 
authorized campus chancellor Randolph W. Bromery to substantially 
raise yearly parking fees for all campus auto users, despite strong op- 
position from employee groups. 

After hearing spokesmen for three employee associations and 
discussing the proposal themselves for about fifteen minutes, the trustees 
asked Bromery to implement: 

-"an integrated transportation and parking system including the in- 
stallation of up to 300 additional parking meters..." 

-"a parking fee schedule including a basic registration fee of $5 to be 
paid by all users of on-campus surface parking and a graduated schedule 
of additional charges for core, edge and reserve parking." 

All cars registered to park on campus now pay $5/year regardless of 
which lot they are assigned to. Under a plan which Bromery is expected 
to implement as soon as the federal wage-price freeze ends in August, 
cars would pay a premium according to the desirability of the lot 
assignment, in addition to the $5 annual charge. 

Under the proposal unveiled yesterday and likely to be adopted by 
Bromery, nearly half the assigned parking spaces on campus would cost 
at least $41/year, and seven-eighths of just over 8,000 available spaces 
would cost at least $17/year. 

Before voting to institute the increases, the trustees heard commentary 
criticizing the plan or calling for more study from five individuals, three 
representing campus groups. 

Atty. Mark Dalton, counsel for the Mass. State Employees' Assoc., 
which represents half of the over 2,000 non-professional employees at 
UMass-Amherst, criticized the plan: 

-because he said, it funds "capital expenditures" -a use of parking fees 
which he labelled improper. 

-because, he said, fees would be used, in part, to subsidize the 10-bus 
free transit system operating during the school year in Amherst and 
surrounding towns. 

-because the plan is an attempt to discourage parking by making it 
cost too much for most users to pay. 

Atty. Augustus Camelio, counsel for local 1776 of the AFL-CIO, which 
represents about 1,000 UMass-Amherst employees, claimed the plan was 
illegal because parking fees, termed "registration fees" by the UMass 
administration, are supposed to go into the state treasury before they 
revert to UMass. 

Camelio called for a review of the plan's legality by Atty. General 
Quinn's office. No such motion was made by the trustees. UMass lawyer 
William Searson has already said the plan is legal, based on previous 
court crises 

The Professional Assoc, of the University of Mass. at Amherst, 
(PAUMA) representing professional administrators called for a review 
of the proposal, calling it a "scheme to manipulate the consumer" and 
claiming funds from fees were to be used as capital outlay. 

Seymour Shapiro, a member of the UMass-Amherst faculty senate who 
in the past has had significant influence with the administration, called 
for a review and postponement of the new fees, primarily because he felt 
few faculty understand the proposal. 

He said the plan, although a viable means to eliminate congestion in 

campus, may be so expensive that UMass campus users might rather live 

with the problem. ,. ^ .. ..- 

"If the community says no, we want to live with it as it is, that should be 

Shapiro said he was afraid that if the plan was implemented, the 
already full free bus system would be hopelessly overcrowded when 

resumed in the fall. , , . 

In response, trustee George Pumphret asked for speedy approval of the 
plan so that "the bugs can be worked out of it." "I find myself getting 
weary (of the parking problem)," Pumphret said. 

Arnold Schneider, a representative of the Mass. Teachers Assoc. 

(Continued on P. 3) 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier 



The Critr is a *em I weekly publication of the Summer session 1973. University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Zamir Nestelbaum 



The Real Proposal 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G.Tripoli 

GibFullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Zamir Nestelbaum 

EdDoherty 




Sam's telling his friends about 
the Crier. Apparently he hasn't 
told you yet, or you'd be here, 
wouldn't you? We're in 402 Student 
Union, and we're fun to work with. 
Come on in! 



******************************* 

* Crier Quiz * 

* I 

* 1 *- - m * 

* Wl ^r * 



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I recently had lunch with a friend of mine named 
Ralphie, who, since he is a janitor at Whitmore, deals 
with the truly important matters that come out or 
there. He was really charged up with excitement. 

"Never guess what I know! Never guess what 1 

know!" 

' ' I give up what ! " I muttered. . 

"Come on guess! It's top secret!" 

"Alright! Alright! Is it that Robert Vesco has been 
appointed a visiting professor of Finance and Ethics, 
temporarily on leave at the University of Costa Rica, 
catching up on a little research there. You know how 
extensive those Latin American Libraries are! 

"Nope!" Ralphie gleefully returned. "Try again! 

"Okay! Is Whitmore planning officially to take 
advantage of Orchard Hill Residential College and 
turn it into the zoo that it has been for years. You 
know Ralphie some days the smell is so strong 

"Wrong again," yelped my eager friend. "One 

more guess!" .. 

"Maybe Dean Dwight Allen is going to run the 
School of Ed. Fall Marathon on the theme of: Quota 
Education: What the Fuck!" 

"Strike Three' Ralphie growled and thumbed me 
out. Ralph always had a flair for the dramatic. I got 
ahold of the new parking proposal coming up in front 
of the Trustees. It's Dynamite! It's gonna blow this 
place apart," chortled my blue coUared buddy. 

I immediately grabbed him by the collar, picked 
him up, and begged for a good parking space at a 
minimal fee. Because let's face it, janitors at Whit- 
more have an incredible amount of power. If just for 
one day they didn't show up for work, the place would 
just fall apart. With all the Bullshit that gets slung 
there, it takes a Herculan effort to keep up with it 

"Nah! Grab Hold of Yourself. Think of what John 
Mitchell once said: "When the going gets tough, the 
tough get going!" 

"I'm going, I'm going!" I cried. "Now tell me, 

what is it?" 

"It's called the S.D.T.S.P.P.XL193.62G Plan which 
stands for the Super Duper Top Secret Parking 
Proposal XL193.62G, or the Yorty Plan. It divides the 
Campus into six parking areas. First there's the 
Royal Lots..Then there's the K.M.A. (Kiss My Ass) 
Faculty Lots both located near the heart of the 
campus." 

"Sounds great so far," I offered. 

"After that there's the Near Fringe Lots located a 
healthful fifteen minute walk from the Campus 
Center. Then there's the Middle Fringe Lots located a 
mere twenty minute trot from the Campus Pond, 



excellent for you jogging nuts. If you don't happen to 
be so lucky, you can park in the Outer Fringe Lots, 
which guarantees to make a track star out of any 
driver. A twenty five minute sprint is all that is 
needed to reach Hasbrouck Lab. .For those of you who 
may not make it in one heat, the Physical Plant has 
graciously donated a stool at the half way mark for 
your convenience. You might start thumbing, but 
well that would defeat the vyhole purpose of driving 
your car to school, so Outer Fringe sticker holders 
will be shot on sight, if caught thumbling, by our 
friendly local police. 

"What a Bummer," I intelligently murmured. 

"That's not all," Ralphie interjected. "I forgot to 
mention the Yukon Lots which are located just a 
nineteen mile Slap Shot from the Student Union. But 
this is no problem. Those parking there will be able to 
take a pack of sled-dogs to Belchertown (for a token 
stipend) in order to catch a UMass Bus into the 
University." 

"Who's going to park in the Inner, Middle, Outer 
and Yukon Lots?" I innocently asked. 

"Who else!" Ralphie leered. "Students and Staff. 
Who did you think?" 

"I'm sorry, I'm ashamed of myself. I don't know 
what I was thinking. How much will they cost?" 

"AHA! This is the BEST PART! The Royalty will 
pay $10.00 for a sticker-after they work here and 
deserve some sort of break for that. The K.M.A. Lot 
People will pay $12.00 smackers. The Inner Fringe 
chumps dish out $35.00 bills for the joy of "am- 
bulating". The Middle Fringe clowns pay $60.00 in 
tribute, which includes a free New England Patriots 
jockstrap with each sticker. The Outer Fringe Slobs 
shell out $110.00 clams for their sticker, including 
emergency oxygen and first aid kits. The Yukon 
victims have the privilege of enriching Whitmore by 
$311.59, to cover the cost of yelling mush-union sled 
drivers you know-quite a problem. This also includes 
a 10% discount for mittens at the Whitmore Bargain 
Basement." 

"WOW!" I wept in disbelief! "This is worse than 
Watergate. What a scandal! " But I knew that Ralphie 
not only spoke the truth but the inevitable, as he was 
an experienced Whitmore shit sorter. "Tell me one 
thing though! Why is it called the Yorty Plan? - 
Because they're trying to turn UMass into another 
Los Angeles-One Huge Filthy Polluted Parking 
Lot?" 

"No! " Ralphie answered. "Because the only smart 
thing to do when you lose is to get the fuck out of 
town!" 



mere iwemy imuuic nut m»n ««- ■"■' ■ > ^^ . . 

WMPIRG Director Takes On Torrey 



Qfofnxm 



Here's today's Crier Quiz. Our Mystery Man is 
famous in the world of sports, and the hint is that he 
was in the news about six weeks ago. Remember, 
first person to make it to Room 402 Student Union 
and tell us who he is gets their picture in Thursday's 
Crier. Hurry! 




And here's last Thursday's 
winner, Bob Marchand of 22 High 
St., Amherst. He correctly guessed 
last Thursday's Mystery Man as 
none other than Ron Turcotte. 
jockey of superhorse Secretariat. 
Congrats, Bob, you've joined an 
elite club. 



* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



(The following is a letter sent to the Chairman and 
members of the Amherst Board of Selectmen by 
Ronald Bogard, Director of WMPIRG.) 

Dear Mr. Torrey: 

I have recently learned that in addition to your full- 
time position as Town Manager, you also serve as a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Amherst 
Savings Bank. In light of your recent memorandum 
of May 31, 1973, I know you are aware that our 
Legislature has enacted a broadly-defined conflict of 
interest law, intended to prevent giving the ap- 
pearance of conflict as much as to suppress all ten- 
dency to wrongdoing (Chapter 268A of the General 
Laws). According to your memo, sent to all 
municipal employees to inform them of the statute, 
the law "prohibits a variety of acts including bribery ; 
receiving compensation, other than official town 
compensation, for any matter in which the town has a 
substantial interest; acting as an agent or attorney 
for anyone in a claim against the town or for anyone 
doing business with the town; and participating in a 
matter in which he, his business associates, or 
relatives have a financial interest." 

As a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Amherst Savings Bank, you have a financial 
responsibility to the depositors of that institution and 
an obligation to promote and protect their interests. 
Your duty as a member of that Board is to establish 
policies and take action which will maximize the 
return on their investments. 

As Town Manager, you are the highest appointed 
executive employee of the Town of Amherst. You are 
charged with the responsibility of protecting the 

interests of Amherst citizens and of implementing the 



policy decisions of the Board of Selectmen. 

In many instances, the interests of the two cor- 
porate bodies which employ you may proceed in 
harmony; action taken to advance the interests of the 
Amherst Savings Bank may well also serve the best 
interests of the Town of Amherst. In other instances, 
however, the divergent values and purposes of the 
two corporations may create a conflict of interest 
situation, either real or apparent. 

A case in point might be the critical sewage 
situation which the Town presently is trying to 
resolve. As Town Manager, your charge is to im- 
plement policies determined by the Board of Select- 
men, based upon their assessment of many com- 
peting factors: protection of Amherst's natural en- 
vironment, preservation of the health facilities and 
other considerations. As a Trustee of the Amherst 
Savings Bank, you may well be faced with a different 
set of considerations relative to the sewage situation^ 
The Bank's commitment to local contractors and 
builders and its obligation to maximize return on 
investments could lead to different conclusions 
regarding solutions to the sewer crisis. 

I would, however, appreciate a public statement 
regarding your ability to fulfill your duties as Town 
Manager and, at the same time, to advance the in- 
terests of the Amherst Savings Bank. While at this 
time I have no reason to believe that any actual 
conflict of interest has taken place, I am sufficiently 
troubled by the appearance of a conflict to request 
your speedy and public response to clarify this 

situation. , _ 

Very truly yours, 

Ronald E. Bogard 

Director 



Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



I The Coca Cola Monopoly Bill 



To The Editor: 

REMEMBER JAMES 
STEWART IN "MR. SMITH GOES 
TO WASHINGTON" 

Isn't there one Congressman 
either in the Senate or House of 
Representatives who will check 
into the Coca Cola Monopoly Bill 
0978 which just passed the Senate 
on Thursday, June 14th by voice 
vote which would exempt a large 
corporation such as Coca Cola 
LA., who made $6.8 million net 
after taxes in the year 1972, from 
the anti-trust laws of the United 
States? 



Who's been paid off? Why was 
Senator Eastland so interested in 
passing this bill? Why have so 
many Senators supported this bill 
and why was it passed so secretly 
by voice vote? 

We citizens and businessmen 
who work so hard for a buck should 
start investigating the Senate of 
the United States and ask them to 
do a little house cleaning with their 
own members. 

I am a groceryman who last year 
did over $250 million in sales and 
our profit to our shareholders 
came out one-quarter of 1%. 

If Congress is going to keep faith 



with the businessman and par 
ticularly us grocers during this 
price freeze, they fj£* ffl 
passing special interest l«f ^"J 
for those people who have enough 
money and enough power -to m 
fluence enough Congressmen to 
pass special interest ££***; 
Can't I get somebody tottg»JJ 
me? If you are interested pleasei 
call me dl 213-732-6271 or write to| 
me. 

Robert E. Laverty. President 
Thriftlmart. Inc. 

1837 South Vermont Ave. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 90006 



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The Masque Ensemble. 



Still A Mistake 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 

Masque Ensemble 
Back for 3rd Season 



The Masque Ensemble is back for its third season at UMass with 
a funfilled summer of participatory theatre open to all summer 
school students and members of the community. The Masque will 
present two major productions and offer workshops in all aspects of 
theatre as well as design and construction seminars. 

The Masque is supported by the R.S.O. Summer Activities 
Committee. Previous summer activities of the Company which 
have met with great enthusiasm include A Slight Ache by Harold 
Pinter, The Drunkard, by William Smith, and Sandbox by Edward 
Albee among others. 

This summer the Masque proudly offers John Van Druten's Bell, 
Book and Candle, a charming romance of witches and warlocks to 
be presented July 27-29 and August 2-4 at Bowker Auditorium (in 
Stockbridge Hall, UMass). The curtain is 8:00 p.m. Van Druten is 
the author of I Am a Camera, from which the popular Cabaret was 
adapted. The production will be directed by Bonnie Bishoff . 

Tickets will be free for UMass students with I.D.'s and $1.50 for 
the general public. Ticket information may be obtained by calling 
UMass Travel in the Student Union Lobby, after July 9, or by 
contacting the Masque office, 328 Student Union (545-2271). 



Workshop Offering 



COMMENTARY 
By BILL DENSMORE 

The trustees have, after several 
months of hedging, agreed to 
higher parking fees on this campus 
for next fall. While their decision 
reflects a degree of environmental 
foresight and planning which is 
commendable, they have, 
nonetheless made a mistake. 

They have made a mistake not 
because increased fees isn't 
philosophically a good weapon 
against what President Wood 
described as the "automobile 
monopoly" on this campus, but 
because nobody wants higher fees. 

What the trustees did was 
terribly liberal and right on en- 
vironmentally and all that. By 
raising the charge to park on 
campus the trustees hope, by the 
laws of economics and supply and 
demand, force fewer autos onto 
campus each morning. With fewer 
cars there will be less air and noise 
pollution and the pristine little 
town called Amherst will be one 
eighth of the way towards staying 
that way. The same principle is 
soon to be applied by the federal 
gov't in major cities across the 
U.S. 

President Wood thinks higher 
fees will offer drivers in Amherst 
an "alternative" to take the free, 
federally-funded bus system to 
work instead of driving. And, he 
pointed out, the higher fees are 
bound to be unpopular because 
"the only popular tax is one which 
nobody has to pay." 

Student trustee Nick Apostola 
said at the Monday meeting when 
the fees were approved that he 
though the plan was a good one 
even though it was formulated 
behind closed doors. He seems to 
have struck on the essential point 
of the situation without being 
smart enough to realize it himself. 

Every group which now has the 
privilege of parking at UMass 
Amherst has at one time or another 
questioned the idea of increased 

(Continued from P. 1) 
(MTA) which is trying to 
organize UMass faculty through an 
Amherst affiliate, said the plan 
might be considered unfair labor 
practice because it is a major 
change in working conditions that 
has not been negotiated. Schneider 
has no official position as 
representative of any UMass- 
Amherst group. 

Student trustee Nicholas 
Apostola, who voted for the in- 
creased fees that will cost students 
at least two or three times more to 
register their cars this fall, said he 
was "convinced" that plan is "a 
good proposal", but said "the 
administrtion has developed the 
proposal in closed session." 

Apostola said he was afraid 
campus groups would not follow 
the new fees schedule because they 
do not understand it, and do not 
want it. 



fees. At Monday's meeting two 
employee unions, one teacher's 
union rep, an administrators' 
assoc. representative and a faculty 
senate member all spoke against 
adopting new fees at this time. The 
speaker of the Student Senate, 
although he did not speak at the 
meeting, has indicated he is 
against the proposal because it was 
foisted in private. 

The fact remains, that in their 
materialistic and unenlightened 
view, the majority of the campus 
users at UMass would rather live 
with the parking problem as it is 
than pay through the nose to 
eliminate it. That is fine. That is 
their position. They are the users 
and it should be up to them. 

But unfortunately H isn't. A 
bunch of honestly uninvolved 
trustees who have neither their 
money nor their frustration at 
stake have chosen to have higher 
fees, simply because some of them 
on their comparatively infrequent 
trips to campus think they perceive 
a parking problem. It's no problem 
.for them, so why are they making 
the decision based on their per- 
ceptions rather than the per- 
ceptions of the 30,000 and campus 
users involved? Taxation without 
representation? A little too trite 
perhaps. 

Perhaps just unwillingness to 
appreciate the opinions of others, 
in order to jump on the en- 
vironment movement ahead of 
everyone else. 

Of course there's another aspect 
to this entire matter which doesn't 
smell too good, although ad- 
mittedly these are observations 
and impressions, not fact. 

Why the hurry to implement a 
plan? Here's a theory which has 
been denied by the UMass "upper" 
administration. When the federal 
Urban Mass. Transit Ad- 
ministration financed the free bus 
system, there was apparently an 
understanding (not binding) 
agreement that one phase of the 
experimental system would be to 
force people to ride the bus by 



increasing parking fees. The un- 
derstanding, at the time, was 
thought to be quite innocuous and it 
was not felt necessary to have a 
public debate about the im- 
plications of increased fees. That 
was in the spring of 1972. 

Now the new fees are a reality 
and it seems as if they were forced 
into being partly because of the 
1972 "understanding" but mostly 
because the University can't 
continue to fund the bus system 
without the fees. I.E., no increased 
fees, no free buses, and no parking 
lot improvements. The ad- 
ministration has tied all three 
together fiscally to make it seem to 
the trustees as if the increase is 
imperative. 

What is needed is less time spent 
over the details of an overall 
transportation proposal and more 
time spent over convincing the 
users of such a proposal that it is 
really necessary. Nobody will get 
anywhere otherwise. 



UMass Gets Grant 



There will be a workshop in 
Personal Growth offered this 
month through the School of 
Education for which you may 
register for no charge. 

The title is: "True Self- 
Identification". The workshop will 
be designed to teach and aid the 
participants in discovering a 
deeper sense of who they are, self- 
identity. It will consist of a series of 
exercises, readings, discussions 
and lectures leading to formulation 
of our true self identities as taught 
by Roberto Assagioli in his book 
Psychosynthesis. This includes the 
notion of a self at the core of each 
individual that can direct the 
harmonious development of all 
aspects of the personality, a 



Higher Self. Beyond that personal 
harmony lies access to higher 
realms-creativity, transpersonal 
experience, and spiritual 
development. We will explore 
these areas deeply and 

significantly towards a 

meaningful concept of who we are, 
both on intellectual and ex- 
periential levels. 

If you are over 18 and are in- 
terested in learning more about 
who you are, your self-identity. 

call Don Mastriano (Instructor) at 
527-3842 to register and learn more 
about the workshop. It will meet 
from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on July 16, 

18, 20. 23, 25, 27. Participants will 
be required to attend all sessions 
and keep a journal during the two 
weeks. 



Yoga Starts Today 



WASHINGTON, DC, June 27, 
1973 - U.S. Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R- 
Mass., and Sen. Edward W. Brooke 
today announced that the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst has been awarded a 
$34,900 contract from the National 
Park Service. 

Under the contract, a study will 
be undertaken of the response of 
barrier island vegetation to 
oceanic overwash and its 
management implications in the 
Cape Hatteras National Seashore 
(North Carolina). 

Principal investigator will be Dr. 
Paul J. Godfrey of the Department 
of Botany. Also involved in the 
study will be Dr. Otto L. Stein and 
PhD candidate Richard Travis. 
The contract period runs from July 
1, 1973, to May 30, 1975. 



Amherst, Mass. -Hatha Yoga, a 
system of health through physical 
and mental discipline, will be 
taught at the University of 
Massachusetts starting today 
under sponsorship of the Division 
of Continuing Education. 

Through a coordination of action 
and attitude, Hatha Yoga achieves 
a toning of the body and mind. It is 
based on a system of physical and 
psychological rules, and conditions 
each individual part of the body 
from fingers to feet, becoming 
ultimately concerned with the body 
as a whole. This improves the body 
in fitness and appearance through 
exercise, according to the in- 
structor for the course, Ms. Yael 
Ariel, a dancer and physical 
education instructor from Israel. 
She has been involved in yoga and 
relaxation exercises for almost 



fifteen years, at the University and 
in Israel. 

The course is designed for both 
men and women and will have 
sessions for beginners and those of 
intermediate skill. The beginners 
session will meet at 7:30 p.m. each 
Tuesday evening starting tonight, 
while the intermediate session will 
meet at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday af- 
ternoons. The course will run for 
eight weeks through Aug. 28 in the 
Campus Center. 

Full information is available 
from the Division of Continuing 
Education, 920 Campus Center, 
UMass, Amherst, 01002, telephone 
(413) 545-2591. Late registration 
can be accomplished at the first 
meeting of the class in Room 175 of 
the Campus Center. A fee of $35 
will be charged for either session of 
the eight-week course. 



Donald S. Call - OPTICIAN 

56 Main St, Amherst - 253-7002 
Contact Lens Fluids 
Bausch & Lomb - American Optical 

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Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



The Critr— University of Massachusetts— Pago S 



Shutter Bugs Descend On Campus 





L. to R. Cindy Corbin, Deborah Marie Aranjo. Carolyn Conway. 



One hundred and seventeen Camera Clubs are joined together to form 
the New England Camera Club Council. The 28th annual conference 
was held on the university campus this past weekend. 

Mr. James J. Tepper, the University conference coordinator, said that 
of the 100 or so conferences that use the university facilities in the sum- 
mer this event is one of the largest and most reliable (all 28 conferences 
have been held at the university). The only problem that arose from 
having the 1,418 members was the lack of a food or coffee shop centrally 
located after the closing of the Bluewall at 7 p.m. 

The conference consisted of 20 lecture programs repeated throughout 
the entire weekend by some fine speakers. Among them one would 
recognize the senior Editor of Popular Photography, Norman Rothchild 
Also throughout the weekend were showcase theater presentations of 
lectures and photo essays including a fine "Concert In Color" by "O.J." 
Roth. 

There was exhibits by a new set of New England clubs, conference 
competitions in color slides and salon prints, a special exhibit by Newell 
Green, FPSA, FRPS, Hon. NEC. A widely acclaimed photographer for 
whom the 28th conference was dedicated. 

If you were in the area of the campus center Sat. or Sun. afternoon, you 
would have seen most of the 1,418 members engaged in a 'photographic 
battle royal'. With their Nikons, Canons, Minoltas, Leicaflexs, Fujicas, 
Konicas, yes, and even a few Instamatics, they clicked and 'shuttered' at 
the 17 girls brought by some of the clubs for the annual "Miss NECCC" 
Beauty Contest. Deborah Marie Aranjo representing the Springfield 
Photographic Society was crowned "Miss NECC" of 1973. Carolyn 
Conway of the Greater Lynn Camera Club was chosen first runner-up. 
Cindy Corbin of the Boston Camera Club was chosen second runner-up. 

The University store reported sales in film for the weekend reached 
about $175.00. Is the campus that photogenic? 



Nothing was sacred, not even the class gift of 1972. 





June Tedeschi-Seacoast 
Camera Club. 



Cameras, Cameras, everywhere those #&%*(£)! 
cameras. 




Photos and copy by John Neister 




Janet Monroe 




First runner-up Carolyn Conway. 



Joseph 
Payne 

Harpsichordist 



"Miss NECC" Deborah Marie Aranjo. 



Thursday, 
July 12th 
8 p.m. 

Bowker 
Auditorium 

Reserve Seat Tickets: 

Free w/UMass Summer 
Student ID 
All others $1.50 

Available at SU Lobby 



Happy Birthday Deer field 



By EDWARD DOHERTY 



Every three-hundred years the town of Deerfield, Mass. has a very 
large celebration. After all, how many times is one town 300 years old? 
Some of you may not know about Deerfield, while some of you may be 
familiar with the town, but for those still in ignorance: Deerfield is 
chiefly noted for "Historic Old Deerfield", a village which is historic, as 
well as old and in Deerfield; another tourist attraction is Mt. Sugar loaf, 
which as everybody knows was named after the "Sugarloaf Frostie" ice 
cream stand in Sunderland; Many people are familiar with Deerfield 
because of the Candlelight Restaurant which features excellent, 
moderately priced food and drink, or the Gables Restaurant which is 
huge and sometimes crowded. 

However, thousands of people now know Deerfield as the town where 
the Rotary Club got drunk. As part of the Tercentenary, last Saturday 
night almost two-hundred kegs of the beer that made Milwaukee famous, 
made Deerfield famous. The scene was a lot behind the high school, a 
natural place to down a few beers and for $2.50 you received a souvenir 
mug and all the suds your stomach could handle. When the thousands of 
mugs were sold out in advance, it was $2.50 for a nice breakable plastic 
cup and all the beer you could drink. 

But why am I telling you all this? Because the night of the party, 
Deerfield officially took over the title as Fun City, Massachusetts from 
our beloved UMass. Yes, after three hundred years, dozens of Indian 
raids and countless horror flicks at the Deerfield Drive-In, the quaint 
town by the banks of the Connecticut River finally outdid UMass in 
Weekend Fun. 

Now there are basically three types of people reading this article, those 
who missed the event, those who were there, but don't remember a damn 
thing and those who were there and remember every thing. For the 
benefit of the first two groups, come back with me in time to those golden 
days of yesteryear as we visit the Rotary Club of Deerfield's glory day. 

The sun was making its way toward the western horizon, as the twelve 
taps started flowing. Every citizen of the old town, from 6 to 60 was there, 
ready to get smashed. The 50 year old men and the 16 year old women 
were drinking equally as fast, and being equally as rude and obnoxious^ I 
was lucky to get a good seat for the event. I was pouring beer at one of the 
taps and had the good fortune to be cursed, poked at, doused with beer, 
and harassed by stiffs who couldn't understand why I couldn t pour ten 
beers at once. Have you ever been at a party where 5,000 people get 
thirsty at the same instant? And you were the one with the power to 
quench their thirsts? I'll tell you right now, there's a fat lady with a mole 
on her cheek a bald guy with a handlebar mustache, a 17 year old braless 
teeny-bopper, a middle-aged woman with three quarts of make-up on, 
and an off duty Greenfield cop who almost got beers dumped on them. By 
me. It was like I was pouring fresh air out of the keg and these people had 
to have it in the next microsecond or die. 

But as you can imagine the real fun didn't start until with 3,000 people 
still thirsty, the kegs ran out. Now in most cases, everyone would have 
said great, we have a good time let's go home, but not that night When 
you have a ticket that says quite plainly "ALL THE BEER YOU CAN 
DRINK" and there is no more beer to drink, and you've already had too 
much to drink, but you want more to drink, then you're going to cause 
trouble. The "We Want Beer" chant, led, I might add, by several UMass 
students, rivaled "We ShaU Overcome" in emotional impact, both for the 
chanters and the listeners. The thriller was watching ten timid Deerfield 
and Sunderland cops stand around and wish they weren't cops. 

But then the Massachusetts "50 lb. Flashlight Club" otherwise known 
as the state police, arrived and everybody quickly decided that they were 
not thirsty anymore. With the pressure off the bartenders at this point, we 
all got together and paused to contemplate the fact that even though each 
of us had poured somewhere in the vicinity of 2 or 3 thousand beers, we 
had not time to drink any ourselves. It was like we were priests dishing 
out communion to our flock, not caring for ourselves, but only for the 
thirsty throats of our parishoners. 

As everybody knows, however, what goes in must come out, and 
although there were a dozen or so Ecology Cans spread around, the 
shrubbery by the edge of the field still had a good, if sporadic shower and 
odor. There were several unofficial awards given out by the bartenders 
after the whole thing was over as we stared out at the darkened mounds of 
litter all around us. The first was the "Youngest Drunk Award" given to 
the 12 year old girl, who, after failing to pick up a 23 year old bartender, 
chugged two beers and passed out in one of the drip pans. The "Oldest 
Drunk Award" was given to a 75 year old grandfather who had half a mug 
of beer and fell asleep in an Ecology Can. The "Stiff of the Night" award 
was given to two UMass soccer players who were so desperate to drink 
after the beer ran out that they filled their mugs from the drip pans. 

All in all the evening was a success for the Abercrombie Schlitz 
Warehouse, the Rotary Club, the town of Deerfield, the State Police and 
thousands of polluted people. Everyone was still anxiously waiting for 
Sunday, for the big parade and fireworks, which, to coin a phrase, were 
the frosting on the cake for the week-long celebration^ The most in- 
teresting aspect of the parade was that the Deerfield Police and Fire 
Department were not able to march as scheduled, because they were too 
busy picking up people who were "allegedly" passing out from heat 
exhaustion." But if you've ever watched a parade on a hot day with a 
hangover, you know what the real cause was. 

Now for some cute comments on the fireworks, and I'll be done and we 
can both sneak into Pufftons Pool, because its a hot one today 

As you know, the best part of the fireworks bj usually not the display 
itself , but the traffic jam afterwards. Well, I would like to call attention to 
the hero of the 1973 Eighth of July display. Right after the fireworks ^were 
over a massive traffic tie-up occurred just north of the Connecticut River 
Bridge by the base of Sugarloaf. A guy dressed in bermuda shorts and a 
tank top ran to the middle of the whole mess blowing a whistle and yell ng 
"Everybody out of the Pool". Within minutes, this self-appointed traffic 
cop had things under control and traffic was moving very slowly con- 
siderably better than not moving at all. Now this may not seem to be too 
humorous to you, a short guy in bermudas with a flashlight and whistle 
directing traffic in Deerfield, but if you knew that this gentleman, Ed 
Sawins his name, had just played 18 holes of golf in 100 degree heat and 
was drunker than a skunk, when he yelled "Everybody out of the Pool 
for the last time, you would have laughed all the way home as I did. See 
you in three-hundred years Deerfield, thanks for a great weekend. 




The July 8th fireworks over Mount Sugarloaf. 



Crier Photo/Gib Fullerton 



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The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



Page •— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 




*********************************************** 






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^ 



Joseph Payne, harpsichordist. Mr. Payne will appear in Bowker 
Auditorium Thursday, July 12th, at 8 p.m. He will also give a music 
hour July 12th at noon on the Campus Center Concourse. 



§ 

* 




m 



Howdy Doody For President 



Payne HereThursdayf 



In answer to the resurgence of 
interest in the harpsichord and its 
music, Joseph Payne, harp- 
sichordist, will perform at UMass 
on Thursday, July 12th in Bowker 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. 

Born in 1938, Payne began his 
musical training at the Lausanne 
Conservatory where his organ 
teacher was Pierre Segon. He 
came to the United States in 1954, 
and while a piano student at Hartt 
College, he came under the in- 
fluence of, and studied with several 
notable figures in the field of early- 
music performance - Fernando 
Valenti, the late Wanda Lan- 
dowska and Luigi Silva, Joseph 
Marx and Joseph Iadone. In 1960 he 
made his debut at Carnegie Recital 
Hall as a harpsichordist. 

Since then he has given concerts, 
lecture-recitals and workshops in 
twenty-eight states and Canada 
and recorded for major radio 
networks, the Haydn Society and 
English Decca. Recent releases on 
the Vox and Turnabout labels have 
included albums of music by 
Scarlatti, Soler, Telemann, and 
excerpts from "The Fitzwilliam 
Virginal Book." His first Bach 
recordings are to be available 
shortly on RCA Red Seal. 

w i 



m 



Since 1965, Mr. Payne has been a 
member of the faculty at Boston 
University's School of Fine & 
Applied Arts. His harpsichord was 
built by the Cambridge maker Eric 
Herz and is an uncommonly large 
instrument. The sixteen-foot 
strings rest on their separate 
bridge and sounding board, 
following the precedent of the 18th- 
century Hamburg maker 
Hyronimus Hass. 

This concert is Mr. Payne's first 
appearance to the University of 
Massachusetts. Reserve seat 
tickets are available at the 
Ticketron Outlet in the lobby of the 
Student Union. 

Creation 

Antiques 

Inventory sale, 
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drastically reduced) 
jewelry, too. 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
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* 



Response to the "I want to sit 
in the Peanut Gallery because. 
. ." contest hasn't been that 
much quantity-wise, but the 
humorous content of some of 
the replies has been something 
else. 

The contest, being run in 
conjunction with the Howdy 
Doody Revival which will 
appear on campus July 18th, is 
open to everyone. Buffalo Bob 
Smith will bring in the whole 
Howdy Doody gang on the 18th 
and the most humorous 
responses will be read to the 
audience. Some of the better 



replies received so far include: 

"I want to sit in the Peanut 
Gallery because. . . 

". . . .1 voted for Howdy 
Doody for President. He was 
the only candidate who made 
campaign promises with no 
strings attached." 

". . . I love wood and I dig 
Howdy's grain." 

". . . I want to lay my 
Mickey Mouse ears at the feet 
of Howdy Doody and publicly 
confess the errors of my past." 

". . . .I'm going to Harrad 
College next year and want 
Howdy to be my roommate." 



And the best one of all (take 
note, Dwight Allen) : 

"I want to sit in the Peanut 
Gallery because it might help 
me get accepted to the 
Graduate School of 

Education." 

You, too, can sit in Buffalo 
Bob's Peanut Gallery. Just 
complete the sentence "I want 
to sit in the Peanut Gallery 
because. . ." and send it to the 
Crier office, Room 402, Student 
Union. Who knows, maybe you 
too can be an official member 
of Buffalo Bob's elite corps! 



* 
* 



$********************************************** 

Schedule Change 



A schedule 
change in the Summer Activities 
'73 program at the University of 
Massachusetts will bring the 
Universal Black Force jazz group 
of Carlos Garnett to the Amherst 
campus tomorrow. 

The 7 p.m. jazz concert will be 
outdoors on the Metawampee lawn 
south of the Campus Center and 
will be open to the public without 
charge. In case of rain, the concert 

CRIER NEWS HOTLINE 

545-0617 



will move to the Campus Center 
Auditorium, where the public will 



be admitted without charge on a 
seats available basis. 



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50 Meadow St 
Amherst 

549-0600 




Activities 
This Week 

• On Campus 

July 10 S 11 Art Sale: FERDINAND 
ROT EN GALLERIES, prints, lithographs, and 
posters. 11:00 a.m. • 6:00 p.m., CC Concourse 

July 10 Film: CROMWELL (and THE 
GREAT MCGONICLE), Richard Harris and 
Alec Giuness depict the personal conflict 
between the two great figures of the English 
Civil War. THE GREAT MCGONICLE stars 
W.C. Fields. 8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 11 - 20 - Art Exhibit: THE BLACK 
WOMAN AS PHOTOGRAPHER, five black 
women from New York City display over fifty 
photographs. SU Gallery, open to the public, 
hours to be announced. • 

July 11 Jazz Concert: CARLOS GARRETT 
8, THE UNIVERSAL BLACK FORCE, 7 p.m. 

July 12 - Music Hour: Joseph Payne, harp- 
sichordist; a brillant young artist from boston 
will be performing works by Bach, Scarlatti 
and D'Anglebert. 12:00 Noon, CC Concourse. 
On the evening of July 12, Mr. Payne will be 
performing a concert in Bowker Auditorium, 



8:00 p.m. 



Play 



REDAY WHEN YOU ARE, C.B., July 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14. Curtain at 8:30. 

WILLIAMSTOWN SUMMER THEATRE 

(Williamstown, Mass.) Season July 5-Sept. 1. 
SAINT JOAN, by George Bernard Shaw, 
July 5-July 14. Remainder of season to be 
chosen from the following: The Seagull 
(Chekhov), The Misanthrope (Moliere), 
Galileo (Brecht), Sweet Bird of Youth 
(Williams), The Master Builder (Ibsen), The 
Second Man (an original musical version of 
The Importance of Being Ernest, by Terence 
McNally.) 

WILLI' N SUMMER THEATRE, Williston 
Northampton School, Easthampton. For 
tickets, dates and other information call 1-527- 
4954). Three productions between June 25 and 
August 6. STORY THEATRE, by Paul Sills, 
BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE, by Leonard 
Gershe, and THE MATCHMAKER, by 
Thornton Wilder. Ellis B Baker, Director. 
Classes and workshops in acting, stagecraft, 
lighting, costumes, playwriting, etc. 



Music 



July 13 7 p.m., Weekend Prelude with 
Malcolm Frager. 9 p.m., Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Mozart. July 14, 10:30 a.m. Open Rehearsal. 
830 p.m., Riccardo Muti conducts Vivaldi, 
Mozart. Andre Watts in Mozart and Rossini. 

July 15 at 2:30 p.m., Seiji Ozawa conducts 
Handel. Haydn, and Mozart. 



Film 



July 11 Recognition of America: THE 
FLIGHT OF APOLLO 11, documentary, A 
PHOTO CONCERT, by Jeff Bubar 



Br ornery Named Corporator 



Chancellor Randolph W. 
Bromery has been named a 
Member of the Corporation of the 
Woods Hole Oceanographic In- 
stitution. 

Corporators are a 102-member 
base group from which the Woods 
Hole institution's trustees are 
named. They serve for an in- 
definite term. Named Corporators 
with Chancellor Bromery were 
Ruth Adams, former President of 
Wellesley College; Louis W. Cabot 
of Boston; Dayton H. Clewell of 
Darien, Conn.; George H. A. 
Clowes of Dover, Mass.; Richard 

Black 
Women 

Pho togs 

The Student Union Art Gallery 
will open a new exhibit on Wed- 
nesday, July 11 featuring the works 
of fourteen Black Women 
Photographers from the Van 
Derzee Institute of New York City. 
With over 70 pieces to be displayed, 
this show should prove to be one of 
the more exciting exhibits to be 
featured in the Gallery this year. 

In conjunction with the opening 
of the exhibit there will be a 
reception in the Gallery on Wed- 
nesday, July 11 from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. The public is invited to this 
reception, which will occur during 
the Carlos Garnett concert on 
Metawampe Lawn Wednesday 
evening. 

The Black Women Photo- 
graphers exhibit • will con- 
tinue in the Gallery until Friday, 
July 20 and is sponsored by the 
Summer Activities Program. 
Gallery hours are usually: 
• Monday - Friday 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. 

Tuesday and Thursday - 7 p.m. to 
9 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday - 1 p.m. to 3 
p.m 



N. Gardner of Columbia Univer- 
sity's School of Law; George 
Nichols, Jr., Head of the Cancer 
Research Institute, Cambridge; 
Frank Press of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; Kenneth 
Shaw Safe of Boston ; and Arthur J. 
Santry, Jr. of Stamford, Conn. 

Founded in 1930 upon recom- 
mendation of the National 
Academy of Sciences, the Woods 
Hole Oceanographic Institution 
has a resident staff of some 750 
scientists and support personnel 
for a wide range of studies in 
biology, chemistry, geology and 
geophysics, ocean engineering, 



and physical oceanography. Five 
ocean-going research vessels are 
operated by the Institution for the 
scientific investigation of waters 
around the world. 

UMass Amherst Chancellor 
since April of 1972, Dr. Bromery is 
known internationally in projects 
to increase educational op- 
portunities for minority students. 



For 19 years before joining the 
UMass geology faculty he was with 
the U.S. Geological Survey. His 
publications include some 136 
geophysical investigation reports, 
bulletins and other papers for the 
Geological Survey, plus others 
published by the National 
Academy of Sciences and the 
Geological Society of America. 



UM 
Gran ts 



—Notices 

Christian Science College 
Organization warmly invites you to 
its weekly meeting at 6:45 p.m. 
every Tuesday. Come and hear the 
Truth that heals. See Campus 
Center Calendar for room numer. 



UMASS OUTING CLUB 
TUESDAY 

Today, Caving and rappelling at 
Sunderland Ice Cave leaves from 
Bus Circle in front of Stockbridge 
Hall at 5:30 p.m. 

TUESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Thursday, July 12, Canoeing on 
Lake Warner leaves at 5:30 p.m. 
from Bus Circle in front of Stock- 
bridge Hall. 

Weekend Trip Friday Night. July 
13, to Sunday July 15, Caving Trip 
to New York. 

Check Outing Club Bulletin 
Board in Student Union opposite 
Ticket office for further details and 
other trips and check locker door 
for equipment rental and return 
hours. 

Classifieds 

FOR SALE 

Refrigerator for Sale: Sears 8 cu. ft Like< 
new Paid $130 Sell for S80 Call 665 3546^ 
after 12 noon. 

T7/12'' 

FOR SALE 

>TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 1218 I 

>auto changer, Sony TC 55 port cassette, 

>EiCO 427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5171. 

t7/U 

FOR SALE 

1967 Mustang, V 8, AT, Air Cond ., PS., 
57,000 miles, Excellent running cond 568 
>7521 

T7/12 

BABYSITTER 

'Parents Can't find a reliable babysitter? 
> Tired of high fees? Call the Child Care 
I Exchange 586 2224. Playgroups also. 

T7/12 

MONEY 
> Earn $2. 00 for participating in a Psychology 
^Experiment. Requires 1 hour, no noxious 
'stimuli. Call Shirley at 545 0071 for Apt. 

T7/19 



Rep. Silvio O. Conte and Sen. 
Edward W. Brooke today an- 
nounced that the University of 
Massachusetts has been awarded 
two federal grants, one from the 
Environmental Protection Agency 
and the other from the National 
Science Foundation. 

The Environmental Protection 
Agency grant, in the amount of 
$52,198, will support an "Air 
Pollution Control Training 
Program." Project director will be 
Dr. James Halitsky, associate 
professor of Civil Engineering. 

The National Science Foundation 
grant, in the amount of $8,000, will 
support a three month study into 
the "Response of Ground- 
Supported Liquid Storage Tanks to 
Science Excitation." Principal 
investigator will be William A. 
Nash of the Department of Civil 
Engineering. 



Crossword Puzzle 



UMass 

Police 
5-2121 



ACROSS 

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waste 
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12 Dirk 

13 Greek letter 

14 Free of 

15 Negative prefix 

16 Mans 

nickname 
18 Female deer 
20 Near 
22 Dropped 
24 Novelties 
27 Imitates 
29 Prophet 

31 A state (abbr.) 

32 Declare 
34 Expires 

36 Foreign Off ice 

(abbr.) 

37 Most certain 
39 Petty ruler 

41 Chaldean city 

42 Post 

44 Fragment 

45 Communist 
47 Mountains of 

Europe 

49 Female ruffs 

50 Kind of cheese 
52 Prepare for 

print 

54 Decimeter 

(abbr.) 

55 Large tub 
57 Den 

59 Spanish article 
61 Mohammedan 

name 
63 Solar disk 

65 Sharpen 
67 Possessed 

66 Tableland 
69 Preposition 

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beyond 
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17 Supposing that 
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46 Man s name 
48 Climbing plant 
51 Parent (colloq) 
53 Note of scale 
56 Scottish cap 
58 Greek tetter 

60 Sign of zodiac 

61 Exclamation 

62 Note of scale 
64 Symbol for 

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Page a— University of Massachusetts— The Critr 



Mitchell Testifies 



WASHINGTON - Former Atty. 
Gen. John N. Mitchell, in a private 
session with the Senate Watergate 
committee Monday, kept up his 
denials of wrongdoing and said he 
didn't discuss the wiretapping or 
cover-up with President Nixon, 
informed sources said. 

Meanwhile, in New York, 
lawyers for Mitchell and former 
Commerce Secretary Maurice H. 
Stans, asked dismissal of charges 
of perjury, conspiracy and ob- 
struction of justice in the case 
involving fugitive financier Robert 
L. Vesco. They said the 
prosecution had improperly in- 
jected the Watergate case into the 
affair, prejudicing the grand jury 
toward indictment. Mitchell and 
Stans have pleaded innocent. 

In another development, Senate 
Majority Leader Mike Mansfield 
endorsed, for the time being, the 
refusal of President Nixon to ap- 
pear before the Senate committee. 
But Mansfield indicated he still 
considers the matter of a 
presidential appearance to be an 
open question, despite Nixon's 
adamant stand that he won't show 
up "under any circumstances." 
Mitchell, accused by former aides 
of approving the Watergate 
wiretapping and covering it up, 
was questioned behind closed 
doors for nearly four hours. 

He is scheduled to begin public 
testimony at 10a.m. EDT Tuesday, 
with the ABC television network 
providing live coverage. NBC will 
cover Wednesday and CBS 
Thursday, under a rotation worked 
out by the three major networks. 
Mitchell's secret testimony 
Monday was "all denials", one 
source reported later. 

Mitchell reportedly confirmed 
that he had numerous meetings 
with Nixon during the 1972 
presidential campaign, but said 
only one concerned Watergate. 
Mitchell reportedly said he and 
Nixon discussed only the political 
embarrassment stemming from 
the affair, not the coverup. 

It wasn't immediately clear how 
much Mitchell's reported account 
might conflict with testimony by 
John W. Dean III that Nixon ap- 
parently knew of the cover-up as 
early as Sept. 15, 1972. This was 
after Mitchell quit as Nixon's 
campaign chairman. 

Dean, ousted White House 
counsel, also testified that Nixon 
discussed aspects of the cover-up 
with him last February and March, 
at a time when Mitchell is thought 
to have been out of direct contact 
with the White House. 
But Mitchell's reported 



testimony about his own role runs 
head-on into that of former aides 
Dean and Jeb Stuart Magruder. 
Dean, who had worked for 
Mitchell at the Justice Department 
before joining the White N House 
staff, said Mitchell played a 
central role in obtaining perjured 
testimony and payoffs in the cover- 
up. Magruder, who had been 
Mitchell's second-in-command at 
the campaign, said he saw Mitchell 
approve the wiretapping March 30, 
1972, after rejecting earlier, more 
expensive plans involving elec- 
tronic surveillance, prostitution 
and kidnapping. In other 
Watergate developments: 

-Former presidential advisor 
John D. Ehrlichman said Dean's 
testimony, which named him as a 
key participant in the cover-up 
plot, "came right out of right field- 
and whole cloth." Ehrlichman said 
he warned Nixon last July, the 
month following the break-in, not 
to discuss executive clemency for 
any of the burglars because the 
subject was too dangerous. 
Ehrlichman said Nixon agreed, 
and the subject didn't come up 
again. He spoke in an interview 
with a hometown paper, the Seattle 
Post-Intelligencer. 

-Lawyers for the Democratic 
National Committee asked 



presidential Press Secretarv 
Ronald L. Ziegler to turn over all 
records he has about the 
Watergate break-in and cover-up. 
Ziegler was asked to supply such 
documents when he gives pretrial 
testimony in the party's $6.4 
million lawsuit for Watergate 
damages. Ziegler is scheduled to 
give a deposition in the case July 
23. 

-The chief counsel for the Senate 
committee, Samuel Dash, said 
Mitchell's wife Martha is welcome 
to come to Tuesday's hearings if 
she wishes. Dash said reports that 
the committee had offered Mrs. 
Mitchell a private room with a 
color television set if she would 
stay away are "absolutely false." 

-The committee can't possibly 
complete questioning of all 20 
scheduled witnesses before Aug. 3, 
when Congress begins a summer 
break, Dash said. Either some 
witnesses will have to be dropped 
or the committee will have to 
resume the current phase of 
hearings after the one-month 
August recess. 

-The committee will make an 
interim report of its findings about 
the Watergate affair sometime this 
fall, Dash said. The committee's 
final report, covering all aspects of 
the 1972 presidential campaign, is 
due next February. 



NE Power Reduced 



A five per cent voltage reduction 
was in effect across New England 
Monday as heat and mechanical 
problems combined to force the 
region's electrical utilities into a 
cutback. 

A spokesman for the New 
England Power Exchange NEPEX 
said 14 electrical generating units 
were off line, reducing the amount 
of power available to the region's 
utilities by 26 per cent. 

However, the spokesman said, 
"We had no area that was com- 
pletely without power due to the 
reduction." The spokesman. Bill 
Connolly of Boston Edison, said 
some of the off-line units were 
expected to be restored by 
Tuesday, easing the power 
problem. 

The five per cent reduction was 
ordered by NEPEX at 11 a.m. At 
the same time, NEPEX broadcast 
an appeal urging customers to 
avoid unnecessary use of elec- 
tricity. 






Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST 8 NORTHAMPTON 
MKiUlttB Telephone 586-3727 

— ► SALE <— 

USED JEANS 2for $ 3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 
WORK SHIRTS 2 for $ 2 



2 for $ 6 

75* 

2 for $ 3 




USED OVERALLS & 
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USED VESTS 

ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

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PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
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In Rhode Island, the 
Narragansett Electric Co. 
specifically asked about 50 in- 
dustrial firms for a temporary 
consumption reduction. 

Elsewhere, public officials 
responded. Non-air-conditioned 
state offices in Connecticut closed 
at 2 p.m. In Maine, Gov. Kenneth 
M. Curtis' office ordered lights in 
the State House complex shut off 
for three hours, while Vermont 
Gov. Thomas Salmon asked state 
employes to cut back on lights and 
non-essential motors. 

By 2:45 p.m., the appeal was 
withdrawn. Connolly credited 
consumer cooperation with a 
levelling off of power use during 
the early afternoon, peak use 
hours. 

However, the voltage reduction 
remained in effect. The reduction 
was ordered as a heat wave sent 
temperatures soaring throughout 
the six-state area. 

The 800,000-kilowatt capacity 
Maine Yankee atomic power plant 
at Wiscasset was down for 
scheduled maintenance. Con- 
necticut Yankee's 600,000-kilowatt 
plant at Haddam Neck has been 
out since Saturday because of a 
turbine problem. 

A unit of the Millstone Point 
Yankee plant at Waterford, Conn., 
went down, while a unit of the 
Public Service Co. of New Hamp- 
shire's Bow plant was out for an 
annual inspection. 

A Boston Edison unit at 
Weymouth was shut down Sunday 
for mechanical problems. Other 
problems appeared Monday at 
plants in Everett, Mass., 
Somerset, Mass., and Sagamore, 
Mass. 

In all, New England's generating 
capacity was down by 4 million 
kilowatts, or 26 per cent, Connolly 
said. He said that 525,000 kilowatts 
were expected to become available 
Tuesday, increasing the NEPEX 
reserve. 






<IMWtoi«T[\ /CONTACTS. 
•niitioi. \mi L |hs L 
I-l»0tNC» I 1 SUPfLHi F 




Oil Firms Charged 



Florida Atty. Gen. Robert 
Shevin filed suit Monday against 15 
major U.S. oil companies, 
charging them with conspiring to 
violate antitrust laws by creating a 
nationwide fuel crisis. 

"There is no gas shortage," 
Shevin told a news conference 
before filing the suit. "Our position 
is that the gas shortage is a direct 
result of anticompetitive practices 
manipulated by the major oil 
companies to protect their 
profits." 

The 68-page suit filed in federal 
court here alleges that the oil 
companies have engaged in an 
illegal monopoly and unreasonable 
restraint of interstate commerce 
and trade. 

There was no immediate com- 
ment from the industry. 
Spokesmen for a number of 
companies said they would have no 
comment until they had read the 
suit. 

A spokesman for Mobil Oil Corp. 
said, "We have had no complaints 
or subpoenas from the state of 
Florida and we don't know what we 
are being accused of. We can say 
categorically that we have not 
conspired with anyone to perform 
any act in violation of the antitrust 
laws." 

In Washington, Sen. Henry M. 
Jackson, D-Wash., said his Senate 
study group will examine federal 
tax preferences for oil and gas 
exploration. 

Jackson said his staff is trying to 
obtain data that Federal Trade 
Commission investigators 
gathered showing that the 
preferences hampered com- 
petition. 



The FTC report was presented to 
the commission last week with 
recommendations for legal action 
to limit the major oil comDanies' 
"clear preference for avoiding 
competition through mutual 
cooperation in the use of ex- 
clusionary practices." 

Industry sources have said that 
the legal analysis submitted with 
the report recommends a con- 
certed antitrust attack to limit the 
major petroleum companies' 
control over refining, pipelines and 
marketing. 

The Florida suit asks that the oil 
companies be forced out of the 
crude oil exploration and 
production business. 

"The basic problem is in the 
crude oil business," Shevin said. 
"That's where the anti-competitive 
nature of the industry brought 
about the results we have today." 

The suit alleges that prices of 
gasoline have risen steadily since 
mid-1972 along with efforts by 
major oil companies to cut off 
supplies to independent and 
private brand dealers, jobbers and 
marketers. 

Named as defendants were 
Exxon Corp. of New Jersey, 
Texaco Inc. of Delaware, Gulf Oil 
Corp. of Pennsylvania, Mobil Oil 
Corp. of Delaware, Standard Oil 
Col of California, Standard Oil Co. 
of Indiana, Shell Oil Co. of 
Delaware, Atlantic-Richfield Co. of 
Pennsylvania, Phillips Petroleum 
Co. of Delaware, Sun Oil Co. of 
Delaware, Union Oil Co. of 
California, Cities Service Co. of 
Delaware, Standard Oil Co. of Ohio 
and Marathon Oil Co. of Delaware. 



Amherst's Tire Store 



ra 



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MICHELIN X Veith llRELLI 
le Havre Rodial Tires •- Steel Belted 



Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 





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PLAZA SHELL ® 



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Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPEN 24 HOURS 



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excellent men 
to lose hours like 
slaves in the 
labor of 
calculation!' 

Gottfried Wilhehn Leibniz (]646-1716) 



Come in and see what's new 
this week in calculators: 
HP-45 - ADVANCED 
SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR 

TEXAS INSTRUMENT — 
SR 10 A NEW LOWER 
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LSBR4BX.!, 



lity of Massachusetts 
July 12. 1973 Volume 2, Issue 6 

JUL 121973 



rs 



4 i 



Party With Porter" At TOC 



University summer school 
students and members of the 
community are invited to attend 
"A Party With Porter" at the Top- 
of-the-Campus on July 18-21 at 8:00 
p.m. Presented by the Masque 
Ensemble and sponsored by the 
Summer Activities Committee this 
"Party" will feature a "revusical" 
compiled from the witty and 
sophisticated music of Cole Porter. 

"Party" spans forty years of Cole 
Porter songs and includes numbers 
from seventeen of his shows. 
Among the musical numbers 
presented will be such well-known 
standards as "Anything Goes", 
"Let's Do It." "Night and Day," 
and "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," 
as well as lesser known songs from 
Porter's personal collection. The 
revusical will be presented in a 
cafe theatre style, recreating a 
1930s nightclub atmosphere with 



costumed chef, hostess, and 
cigarette girl as well as period 
styles for the performers both in 
dance and dress. Dance numbers 
performed by the cast will range 
from the tango and tap to an old 
soft shoe in the style of Fred 
Astaire and Ginger Rogers. There 
will also be opportunity for 
members of the audience to enjoy 
ballroom dancing before and after 
the revusical and during in- 
termission. 

A chef with a traveling cart will 
prepare and serve crepes for the 
guests before the performance. A 
wide variety of drinks will be 
available from the bar. 

"A Party with Porter" is being 
directed by Stephen Driscoll, one 
of the original members of the 
Masque Ensemble who is now 
beginning his fourth season with 
the company. Stephen has had 



experience in all aspects of theatre 
including acting, directing, 
designing, and producing. His 
other activities this summer in- 
clude conducting a student 
workshop in dance and movement 
and performing in the Masque 
Production of Bell, Book, and 
Candle. The cast for "A Party with 
Porter" includes Debbie Hull, 
Marty Kitrosser, Bill Norris, Janet 
Goode, and Meb Bodensiek. Music 
will be provided by Douglas Cox on 
Piano and David Thompson on the 
drums. 

Table reservations for the 
"Party" can be made at the R.S.O. 
Office on the second floor of the 
student union or by calling 545- 
2351. A Top-of-the-Campus card is 
not necessary in order to attend the 
event but there will be a minimal 
cover chage of $1.00 per person. 



Frats, Sororities 
On The Upswing 

By CYNTHIA ROGERS 

Whenever anyone mentioned fraternities and sororities, I immediately 
thought of empty-headed rah-rah jocks, and Miss Susie snobby Sorority. 
Although, in a few cases, these stereotypes are true, most members of the 
Greek System are very "down to earth people". 

But in the sixties, when dorms were still strict and well governed by the 
university, the fraternities and sororites were in great demand. They 
were the major sources of social activity on campus, and could afford to 
be selective in whom they chose. Then, a girl was still judged by the 
clothes she wore, and if a guy couldn't pass, the "manly" tests, then he 
wasn't fit for the "cool" fraternity life. 

However, with the rise of the student strikes, individualism and dope, 
the university was forced to change many of their strict policies. Students 
had no use for tradition, and fraternities and sororities seemed to be a 
symbol of that. Also, most people didn't want to be hassled by the 
"ridiculous" pledging. Membership in the Greek system fell as frater- 
nities and sororities, became a common focal point of teasing. 

Due to these factors, the Greek system changed. But it was changed by 
the students themselves who also were fed up with tradition. They are 
now beginning to recognize themselves as an "alternative life style" at 
the university, a group of people who live in a close communal at- 
mosphere. With the decrease of pledges, pledging became less formal, 
and in one fraternity, the pledge class determines its own activities. The 
Greek system is now becoming an atmosphere of cultural and intellectual 
activity as well as social. They are involved in a lot of fund-raising ac- 
tivities and colloquia are now being offered to improve the self-managing 
of the houses. There are still rules in the houses, but are felt necessary in 
order to provide an atmosphere of cooperation. 

Many of the students reasons for belonging to a house is that they like 
living with a small group of people that they can really relate to. There is 
a feeling of trust that the students don't have to lock their rooms 
every time they use the bathroom. And some of the students like the idea 
of not having to walk to the dining commons and hassle the long lines and 
the bad food. But a lot of the kids are disturbed that there is still the 
stereotype of the Greek system, and would like to see that changed. 

But even though the stereotypes still exist, the status of fraternities and 
sororities is now on an upswing. Although the changes within the struc- 
ture of the houses are a major factor, this is not the only reason for the 
renewed interest in the Greek system. Dissatisfaction of hikes in room 
and board and parking fees also seems to be a reason. Another factor is 
that UMass is slowly becoming a "suitcase" school, and it's getting to be 
difficult to find something to do in the dorms on weekends. Also with the 
decrease in political activities, students in the dorms are less together as 
a group, and it is becoming a colder atmosphere. Many students are now 
trying to seek warmth, an alternative that a fraternity or sorority may or 
may not have to offer them. 



A Hassled UYA To Be ' 'Best Ever 



9 9 



By STEVE SECHE 

"We've been given the worst time ever, but we're still going 
to have the best program ever." So UYA/UMass/Amherst 
Director Ruth Burgin greeted 55 Phase V Volunteers at the 
start of their five-day UYA Training Conference, held late 
last month at the Northfield Inn, Northfield, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Burgin was referring to a series of "arbitrary 
decisions" made at the UYA National Level that, for several 
weeks prior to training, had kept UYA staff and Volunteers 
alike in doubt as to whether there would be a Phase V at all. 
Decisions like a budget cut which forced the number of 
Volunteer slots to be cut from 100 to 70; the reduction-and 
almost total elimination -of the Volunteer readjustment 
allowance, and a serious attempt on the part of the 
Veterans' Administration to deny G.I. benefits to veterans 
who participate in the UYA program. 

Expressing concern about the manner in which the 
decisions were made, with no prior notice, and well after 
Phase V recruitment and training plans were underway, Dr. 
Burgin said that "such actions seriously threaten in- 
stitutionalization of the UYA concept at UMass." She went 
on to say that the decision to withdraw veterans' benefits 
from UYA Volunteers-a decision which was later reversed, 
and full benefits restored-was "irresponsible", and had been 
made by people "who have no conception of the academic 
nature of University Year for ACTION." 

Dr. Burgin restated her confidence in the strength of the 
UYA/UMass/Amherst program to the volunteers, saying, 
"These cuts don't mean that we won't have a quality 
program, but we will have one in spite of them, not because 
of them." 

She went on to explain the evolution of UYA at 
UMass/ Amherst, from its relatively uncertain academic 
beginnings to the present when, she said, "faculty are 
satisfied that there is sufficient academic accountability." 

She pointed to the program's success: as its fifth group of 
Volunteers enters the field, it remains the largest UYA 
program in the country, and continues to have many of its 
program innovations implemented on the national level. She 
attributed a large measure of the program's success to 
earlier Volunteers, adding that she was once again "im- 
pressed by the variety of people and academic pursuits" 
evident in the program's latest phase. "I think one of the 
problems with other programs has been limited in- 
volvement of certain majors, which tends to create a 
somewhat static program," she said. 

She urged the volunteers to "keep the larger picture of the 
program in mind" as the week wore on, assuring them that 
there was a certain scheme which the training program had 
been designed to follow. "But most importantly," she 
concluded, "we're all in this together, and we're going to 
make it together." 

Following Dr. Burgin's opening remarks, the Volunteers 
met for the first time with their respective small groups, and 
after lunch began the tedious process of formal 
registration. 

That evening, Matt Weinstein and Susan Pinsker, 
graduate students in the School of Education with extensive 
experience in the field of human relations, led the Volun- 
teers through an evening of "mixer games". The games 
provided a non- threatening atmosphere in which the 
Volunteers could meet one another, as well as welcome 
relief from the sedentary pursuits of the day. 

Highlights of the rest of the week included: Planned 
Impact Programming-an evaluative device developed by 



Michael Gaffney, a UMass/ Amherst Phase I Volunteer, now 
UYA Program Technical Representative in Washington, 
DC. Gaffney explained the p.i.p. concept, as well as its 
value in helping Volunteers guage their effectiveness at 
their agency jobs. 

—Trends and Directions of Intervention for the 
Amelioration of Poverty-Albert Rosenberg, Executive 
Director, SCOPE, Dayton, Ohio opened Tuesday's afternoon 
session with a presentation that served as a springboard for 
the small group discussions that followed. 

—After-dinner remarks Tuesday evening by Michael 
Gaffney, who presented the UYA National perspective; 
Leon Charkoudian, ACTION Regional Director, who spoke 
about Boston's view of the program, and David Bischoff, 
Associate Provost, UMass/Amherst, who detailed the 
University's commitment to the UYA concept. 

—Credit Options and UYA-James Shaw, Dean, College of 
Arts and Sciences, opened Wednesday's sessions, which 
dealt in depth with the volunteers' academic programs. 




James Shaw, Assoc. Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, and UYA Program Director Ruth 
Burgin spend a few minutes discussing academics 
following Shaw's presentation entitled: Credit 
Options and UYA. 

Shaw traced the academic history of UYA since its early 
beginnings at UMass, and led into the small group meetings 
that followed between faculty members and Volunteers who 
would be working together during the coming year. Glenn 
Hawkes, Asst. Professor, School of Education met with 
students involved in the area of Education; Ethan Katsch, 
Asst. Professor, School of Business Administration, met 
with students working in the program area of Legal Ser- 
vices; Ellis Olim, Associate Professor and Head of the 
Human Development Department met with all Human 
Development majors; David Luke, Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Psychology and Chief Psychologist, Monson 
State Hospital, met with students involved in the area of 
Mental Health; Julius Fabos, Assoc. Professor, Landscape 
Architecture, met with students who will be entering 
planning and environmental protection programs; and 
Nancy Schroeder, UYA Staff, met with those students who 



will be working in the field of Correctional Services. Asst. 
Professor James Matlack, who was unable to attend the 
conference, will serve as faculty advisor for these students 
during the coming year. 

—University Legal Resources-Richard Howland, At- 
torney for Students, discussed the implication of the Hatch 
Act on volunteer political activities, as well as the resources 
his office makes available for all members of the University 
community. 

—The Student in the Community: this topic was the main 
thrust of Thursday's activities, as well as the title of that 
day's first session, which presented Volunteers the op- 
portunity to question both community agency represen- 
tatives and community residents about what to expect once 
they move into their individual jobs. Acting as community 
resource people were: Jean Hanlon, Northampton Public 
Housing Tenants Council; Janet Moulton, Rod Southwick, 
Athol People's Center; Wendy Sibbison, VISTA Volunteer 
from the Franklin County ACTION Commission; Everett 
Kosarick, member of the Belchertown Friends Committee; 
Ann Bailey, Chairperson, Title One Parents' Advisory 
Council; Jack Sullivan, community worker, Monson State 
Hospital; Simon Mielniczuk, and Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
LaFleur, representing the Springfield City-Wide Puvlic 
Housing Tenants Organization. Each of these people met in 
small groups with the volunteers and continued discussion of 
the issues raised during the general session. 

—The Student as Volunteer-continuing with the issue of 
the student once (s)he enters the community, two groups of 
Phase III and IV Volunteers offered their insight and ex- 
perience to the new Volunteers. Jose Garcia, Dania 
Loewenstein, Jeff Middleton and Ann Noonan discussed 
Volunteer roles in community agencies; and Wendy 
Felfield, Chris Ramsey, Bill Lawton and George Ireland 
discussed Volunteers in institutions. Each of the groups felt 
it was important that the Volunteers not set their personal 
goals too rigidly or too early, and that P.I.P. and other 
evaluative devices be viewed as helpful guides to determine 
what can best be achieved by each Volunteer. They were 
also warned that agency/institution staff may often view 
them as students, and assign work which does not fall within 
their job descriptions. "We are potentially more important 
than just students," George Ireland said. 

—Star Power-as with previous training sessions, the 
Volunteers were given a chance to participate in Star 
Power, a "game" which creates situations of power and 
powerlessness among the participants, as well as 
illustrating attitudes that are carried over from the game 
into daily behavior. Julie Adams, head of residence at 
McKimmie House, and John Spiegal, Community 
Development and Human Relations, directed the activity, 
dividing the groups in two. Reminding the Volunteers that it 
was a "luxury to be able to sit here and pretend you are 
powerless-a luxury that the powerless in our society do not 
have". Ms. Adams said as the evening concluded that it 
could be "the beginning of something beautiful, or the end of 
a fame." 

The training conference itself ended after lunch the 
following day, after Volunteers had completed conference 
evaluations and participated in a debriefing session led by 
Dr. Burgin. By mid-afternoon on Friday the Northfield Inn 
was once again quiet and sedate, and Phase V of the 
UMass/Amherst University Year for ACTION was officially 
one week old. 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



Crier 



The Critr is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

GibFullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Michael Ugolini 




Sam likes to have his head 
scratched as much as the next guy. 
Why don't you come down to the 
Crier office and try it. 



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Crier Quiz 




Here's today's Mystery Man, another figure from 
the world of sports. The hint is: don't believe 
everything you see. Don't forget, fans, first person 
to make it to room 402 Student Union and tell us the 
correct identity of Mystery Man gets his picture in 
next Tuesday's Crier. Offer void where prohibited 
by law. Offer also void to any University ad- 
ministrators, who know everything there is to know 
already. 



Here's the winner of Tuesday's 
contest, Peggy Doyle of Center St., 
Greenfield, a student in Art 
Education here at UMass. Peggy 
correctly identified Tuesday's 
Mystery Man as Gordon Johncock, 
winner of this year's Indy 500. 
Congratulations, Peggy! 




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Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



Michael Ugolini 



Rtg (Military) Business 



Item: In 14 states, more than 10% of personal in- 
come comes from defense and related industries, and 
in three (four including D.C.), more than 20% of the 
personal income is from defense payrolls. 

In the early 50's, foreign policy, was based on fear 
(i.e. McCarthyism, managed newsleaks staged by 
the Pentagon). If one could only document the many 
times the "weaponeers" came before Congress 
shouting "missile gap" and "technology gap", when 
in reality they were only bullshiting us, through 
selective disclosure of partially analyzed in- 
telligence, in order to panic the country into ex- 
pensive weapons programs. 

This exploitation of the economy for defense pur- 
poses made it difficult to judge whether our foreign 
"enemies" were really enemies or whether they were 
only necessary symbols for the perpetuation of a way 
of life, a way of defense, that couldn't be dealt with 
without accurate information. 

Never in American history has a war been ended 
without an accompanying diminution of the arms 
industry except in the case of the Second World War. 
After World War Two, the military was integrated 
with Big Business. The national goal was a per- 
manent war time economy which was begun when 
each defense industry named a special laison official, 
with the commission of a reserve colonel, to serve 
with the armed forces. The National Security In- 
dustrial Association and the Aerospace Industries 
Association were just two of the links between 
business and the military. 

But the establishment of an intricate Pentagon 
industrial laison was not the end of it. These military 
quacks went so far as to contract for even that portion 
of weapons production that it had customarily han- 
dled itself, that is, not only did it rely on private in- 
dustry for the production of weapons, the military 
also turned to private industry to think up new 
weapons, to test them, and to keep them in shape. 

Item: Since World War Two, the U.S. Government 
has spent 19 billion dollars on missile systems that 
either were never finished or were obsolete when 
completed. 

The beauty of the military system is that it is the 
kind of waste that fits right in with the rest of the 
economy; the shit that comes out of the plants of 
United Aircraft competes with no civilian products, 
does not interfere with the patent rights of other 
corporations, and does not accumulate the kind of 
inventories that retards continued production. When 
the munitions do not get used in war, they quickly 
become obsolete and are junked or sold at knock- 
down prices or given away to clients. There are no 
surpluses, and the demand is inexhaustable. 



Another facet of the Defense Department, the CIA, 
is the agency that least is known about. It has suc- 
cessfully fought off every effort by Congress to 
oversee its work seriously. Its cost are scattered 
throughout the budgets of other agencies and 
disguised in that way. The best informed guessers put 
the CIA budget at well over 1 billion. The CIA may 
spend its funds in any fashion it desires-including the 
bribing of foreign officals and the subsidizing of 
foreign armies and assasins -and not even the 
President can be sure how they were spent. But you 
can bet that their primary purpose is to help Big 
Business in imperialistic ventures abroad and keep 
opposing rebels in their place, even if it means 
supporting fascist dictatorships like Spain, Portugal, 
Greece, and Thieu's circus in South Vietnam. 

Often military assistance is given under the guise 
of economic assistance. The Export-Import Bank, 
which in 1968 was discovered to be up to its neck in 
arms peddling, had had a reputation of an 
organization devoted entirely to financing in- 
ternational projects of a civil kind-steam plants, 
commercial airlines, auto manufacturing plants and 
the like. But arms? Never. 

Or so we thought until 1968. Anticipating Federal 
cutbacks in spending to supply arms to foreign 
nations, these bastards found another way around the 
congressional troublemakers. Thus, the Ex-Im Bank 
became the way. 

By the time the Ex-Im Bank was caught par- 
ticipating in this mischief, it had helped peddle more 
than 1 billion in arms to major nations and more than 
600 million to "developing nations". The Ex-Im 
Bank's part in the arms race began in 1962 with the 
financing of arms for both Austria and Italy at a time 
when they were arguing over South Tyrol. It was like 
selling gasoline and matches to two pyromaniacs. 
But the real plunge came in 1965 and before these 
hammerheads were through spreading their credit, 
they had financed arms for Israel, Jordan, Saudi 
Arabia, Morocco, Iran, Pakistan, India, Malaysia, 
Formosa, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Venezuela, 
Australia, Britain, and 'New Zealand. 

There are some strange combinations in that 
group. Pakistan and India are enemies; we sold to 
both. And while the State Department publicly 
favored the cause of Israel, the Department of 
Defense (through the Ex-Im Bank) was doing what it 
could to help the Arab side, too. Either the two 
departments were working at cross purposes, or 
"foreign policy" was being subverted for the cause of 
the dollar. 

Michael Ugolini is a Crier columnist. 



A Letter From God 



(Editor's Note: No kidding, folks, 
we really received this letter.) 

My Dear Sir: 

As Almighty GOD, I greet you. 

These past titteen years, My 
Heart has known contentment in 
these Letters which I have dictated 
through My Son, Personally, to 
you. 

We have almost three-thousand 
Editors and Publishers - over the 
world - on Our mailing list. It would 
have been almost a physical im- 
possibility for My Son to write 
personal Letters, individually, to 
each Editor and Publisher. Hence, 
We send these Form Letters which 
are Personal indeed. 

Each and every Letter, dictated 
by Me, you Living GOD, has a 
Living, Loving message to its 
intended, graceful personage. 
Those who believe in Me, shall be 
rewarded in Heaven - after their 
long sojourn on earth has ended. 
No need to say a word to those who 
disbelieve - they will try to find 
solace, peace and contentment in 
hell, but alas, to no avail! 

But Love is for the living who will 
not relinquish their self-esteemed 
right to Love Me, their Loving 
Creator. I Am not Alive to be put 
aside in some dusty, musty old 
Bible. I Am Alive to fill con- 
tentment in every living, blessed 
heart, here, on earth. 

Disgusted! 

To The Editor: 

As a reader of the Crier I can 
only express my disgust upon 
reading the story on the New 
England Camera Club Council 
(7/10). 

If those guys are that desperate 
for something to take a picture of 
they should try sticking one of 
those long telephoto lenses up their 
photogenic asses. 

Emma Doggi 



My Loving Son will blow you a accomplish Virtue, 
kiss as My Loving Voice trails in Prayerfully yours, 

the distance. Never, will My Holy Eugene Changey 

Name be written on paper. My PS. Please publish this Blessed 

humble Son will sign this Blessed Letter in your Gracious 

Letter so that Faith and Hope will Newspaper. 




June 30th 

She was kicking through the 

swath of lawn 

Between the road and 

sidewalk. 

Head high, tendons rigid, face 

aglow, 

Step bright, soul free. 

This, I see, is one of the new 

people, 

One who marches the by-ways 

Like a breakfast of Bran 

denberg Concerti. 

I watched for some woman 

sign of man recognition 

But we had passed, 

And people who are breakfasts 

of concerti 

Never look back. 

Brooks Garis 



MY DREAMPOEM 

Behind the closet wall, 

if the shelves were taken out. 
Was a stairway, 

which only led down, 
To a giant basement, 

which didn't exist. 
The floor, tiled red and black, 

on which to ride a bicycle? 
In the center, a big red round 
couch, 

a decorator's delight. 
A childhood dream, 

disclosed in a dream. 

BY PENELOPE 




Campus Carousel 



Soul Food In Fresno 



By TONY GRANITE 

SOULFUL FOOD may be about to 
happen at the Fresno campus of 
California State University, ac- 
cording to a page one piece in a 
recent Insight. Seems that after 
surveying student reactions to 
cafeteria food, a professional chef 
is being hired to take over in the 
Fall. 

What apparently stimulated the 
decision was when 71 per cent of 
the respondents said "yes" to the 
question: "Has the food ever been 
so bad that you couldn't eat it?" 

Even more students (78 per cent) 

answered yes to the question, "Has 

the food ever been so bad that you 

wouldn't eat it?" 

a a a a 

BEST-SELLING BOOK of 1972 was 
"The Living Bible", according to 
the Student newspaper of Moody 
Bible Institute in Chicago. Ken 
Taylor's paraphase of the Bible in 
modern English sold almost 
7,000,0000 copies. Outlets included 
J.C. Penney, Montgomery Ward 
and the "5 and 10 cent stores." 

The book is currently being 
translated into 71 other languages. 

In contrast, the Student says, the 
fiction best seller, "Jonathan 
Livingston Seagull", sold 2,000,000 
copies. 



NEUTERIZING is what The Daily 
Beacon, student newspaper of the 
University of Tennessee, is going 
to be doing as a solution to the 
current flap about references to 
sex. 

Besides using such "sexless" 
terms as "chairperson and 
newsperson", the newspaper will 
use "tey" for he and she, and 
"tern" for him and her. The 
possessive form will be "ter." 

These "genderless pronouns" 
replace the use of Miss, Mr and 
Mrs. as well as Ms. preferred by 

some feminists. 

* * * • 

INDEPENDENT STUDENT 
NEWSPAPERS separated 
financially and administratively 
from their institutions is the 
recommendation of the American 
Association of State Colleges and 
Universities. 

In a recent 115-page report, the 
AASCU concluded that an in- 
dependent newspaper served both 
students and administration better 
than other models of campus 
newspaper operations, and helped 
solve many problems, many of 
them legal, surrounding the 
campus press. 



$750,000 Up, 
$599,250,000 To Go 



Tallahassee., Fla. - State of- 
ficials took possession of $750,000 in 
silver, gold and coins believed to be 
part of a $600 million treasure 
carried by two Spanish galleons 
which sank in 1622. 

Robert Williams, director of the 
Florida Archives, said Wednesday 
the state had taken custody of the 
treasure to make sure Florida gets 
its 25 per cent share of the find as 
legally required. 

In turn, Williams said, the state 
will help protect the discovery 
made by Treasure Salvors, a firm 
of treasure hunters. The treasure 
was found under 20 feet of sand 30 
miles off Key West 

Armed guards kept watch as the 
treasure was leaded into ice chests 
at the Treasure Salvors 
headquarters in Key West for the 
journey to the state capital of 
Tallahassee. 

Treasure Salvors officials 
believe the find is just a small part 
of a $600 million fortune hidden in 
the wreckage of the Spanish 
galleons Nuestra Senora de Atocha 
and La Margarita which went 
down in a hurricane in 1622. 

Officials say the find would be 
the oldest and perhaps richest 
shipwreck ever uncovered in the 
United States. 

In the mid-1960s the Real Eight 
Corp. uncovered the remains of a 
Spanish armada off Cape Kennedy 



and retrieved millions of dollars 
worth of gold and silver ingets, 
jewelry and valuable artifacts. 

"The treasure has to be kept in 
water to stop it deteriorating and 
that is why it was shipped in ice 
chests," said Bleth McHaley of 
Treasure Salvors. 

"We had seven Marine patrol 
officers armed with guns standing 
by. This discovery has attracted a 
lot of attention." 

The Atocha and La Margarita 
were reported to be carrying $600 
million in gold and silver when 
they disappeared. Hundreds of 
galleons were lost between the 16th 
and 18th centuries, when Spain 
looted the fabulously rich Aztec 
and Inca empires of the New World 
and cascade of gold, silver and 
precious stones flowed into the 
ports of the Caribbean. 

Once a year, Spanish ships made 
the rounds of the ports, meeting in 
Havana, then sailing for home. 'But 
the route up the Florida east coast 
and across the Bahama Bank to 
Bermuda was a treacherous one 
and whole fleets were lost. 

Kane Fisher, 14, son of Treasure 
Salvors President Mel Fisher, 
made the first discovery which led 
to diving teams exploring the area 
where the $750,000 worth of gold 
and silver bars, silver pieces of 
eight and other artifacts was 
found. 




WASHINGTON, D.C.-College Work-Study grants for Fiscal Year '74 
totalling $1,134,286 have been awarded to 13 colleges In Western 
Massachusetts and the three University of Massachusetts' campuses, 
U.S. Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R-Mass., and Senator Edward W. Brooke an- 
nounced today. ■ , . w: • 
. AdminhftereaHy the U.S. Of fie* of Education the Work^Study program 






/■ > 



y&j 






fA 



V 



What They 're Saying Now 
About Buffalo Bob Smith 



"It's Howdy Doody Time again. The first TV 
generation has found its very own version of sweet 
nostalgia. . . ." 

"Soon there will be Howdy Doody LPs on the 
market and NBC is now casting for a rock group 

called Howdy Doody and the Peanut Gallery " 

"Last month he made a smash theatre debut at 
the Fillmore East, New York City's rock pallace. 
There, the old-fashioned Rotarian-like 53-year old 
beguiled his long-haired audience and put himself 

in line for a new career " 

Life Magazine 
"In a recent appearance at Fillmore East, New 
York City's rock Emporium, Mr. Smith began his 
act as usual by plunking sour notes on the piano. 
Lifting the piano top, he peered inside and then 
remarked: "Oh that Clarabell, you never know 
where he's going to hide his rolling papers." 

"The response was pandemonium " 

The Wall Street Journal 
"Howdy Doody is strictly an on-campus rejoice; 
a bright new zoom in collectibles. Buffalo Bob 
Smith has summoned his substantial ghostly gang 
out of the past, marshalled them onto campus 
stages. ..." 

"They also pay as much as $10 a ducat, and 
more and more of them are seeking out 
Doodyphernalia - mugs, lunchboxes, T-shirts, 
dolls, shoepolish containers, jewelry and the 
Howdy Doody watch with those moving eyes. ..." 

Mademoiselle 

"I think everybody should be a kid in some ways 

as long as they live. Everybody should be able to 

play. There are very few things you can do with 

the abandon that you can watch Buffalo Bob with. . 

H 

National Observer 

by a senior at Tulane 

''Play it again, Howdy Doody!. . . ." 

"The man with the gray rinse in his hair, that 

familiar happy face, those dancing eyes, that 

buck-skin jacket. Could it be? Yes. Yes. It's 



Buffalo Bob Smith. ..." 

"Since he was invited to bring his Howdy Doodj 
revival to the liberal University of Wisconsin, 
Buffalo Bob has been riding the campus trail 
playing to packed houses for students who long for 
the good old days. . ." 

Joseph Modzelewski 
Daily News 

"Kids, it's Howdy Doody Time again. If reports 
from San Diego, Boston and New Orleans are any 
indication this scene will be replayed with 
nostalgic gusto when the Howdy Doody Revival 
Show featuring, yes kids, Buffalo Bob Smith 
himself, invades the Fillmore East for two per- 
formances. ..." 

"He's booked until February 1972 at every kind 
of campus from West Point to the University of 
California. . ." 

Grace Lichtenstein 
New York Times 

"In a strange change of pace from the rock 
music that usually vibrates at New York's 
Fillmore East, a performer from the then 
generation came onstage and asked disarmingly, 
"Say kids, what time is it?" It's Howdy Doody 
Time!' roared out the audience of young adults 
and teen-agers who had gathered for a reunion 
with Buffalo Bob Smith, the TV idol of their 
childhood. . . ." 

"His old fans joined him in singing songs from 
his old Howdy Doody Show - even the Colgate 
toothpaste commercial. . . ." 

Newsweek 

"Buffalo Bob, the jolly television host who daily 
led 15 million youngsters through the Howdy 
Doody do's and don'ts during the fifties, is packing 
former Peanut Galleries into college auditoriums 
these days, where, with tears in their eyes they 

sing the old songs and play the old games " 

Andrew H. Malcolm 
The New York Times 



Social Action For Foreign Students 





l ^t^idefi ^ot'Jfcptrtfpt federal funding U studepj payrolls wtthfjfc^ 
rern*inii«20 JJircejtf to be contributed by tneeouege, *■ \ •& * TM 

It is estimated that today's awards will allow 2,438 students to be wn- 
ployed at these colleges during the 1973-74 academic year. 

Conte is a member of the Labor-Health, Education and Welfare Ap- 
propriations Subcommittee which has jurisdiction over funding for the 
Work-Study program. 

The breakdown of institutions and grant awards is as follows : 



Amherst College 
Berkshire Christian College 
Berkshire Community College 
Greenfield Community College 
Hampshire College 
Holyoke Community College 
Mt.Holyoke College 
North Adams State College 
Northampton Junior College 
Simon's Rock College 
Smith College 
University of Massachusetts 

(all campuses) 
Westfield State College 
Williams College 



47,084 
6,374 
43,318 
34,951 
21,731 
23,180 
65,556 
$207,463 
$ 20,644 
$ 10,865 
$ 34,860 



$503,446 
$ 87,650 
$ 27,164 



The social action options that 
have involved so many UMass 
students in community problems in 
the past two years have now been 
extended to foreign students. 

Through the cooperation of Dr 

at At Moss-; John Jfessup, 
student advisor; and Steve Rath 
mill, community organizer for the 
Hampshire Community Action 
Commission; foreign students 
from UMass are working in a six- 
week summer pilot program at 
fou* coipmiumty serviced agencies 
ln:Norttan*t»* >«-. i ,.,;-± 

: An Indian *tijtfen(, h ftavt 
Kulk$rni, is helpln| out *t the 
Alcoholism Prevention Program 
office on v Market St. Two Spanish- 
speaking students from UMass, 
Morella Carnevali of Venezuela 
and Eduardo Ramirez from 
Mexico, work at the Spanish- 
American Center on Market St. 

Mira'Gark, an Indian student, 
works at the Elm St. day care 
center, and last but not least, Abel 
Ponce de Leon, a student from 
Peru, is assigned to the Hampshire 
Correctional Services offices at the 
county House of Correction on 
Cherry St. 

The Peruvian student's work 
with Spanish-speaking prisoners at 
the Cherry St. jail has helped many 
people in many ways, according to 
Rathmill -in counseling, legal 
problems and in other areas where 
language has been a barrier. 



The project has. been an 
educational bonus for the foreign 
students, he said. "It gives them an 
idea of what American com- 
munities and their people are 
like," RathmiU said,.. ', and also 
indioatew$ai foreign s^udent$.ca^ 
:* ■* >"»■ "if •<-'-: T -i-"^'* * 



and do join in American com- 
munity action efforts." 

Support for the project comes 
from AID, the U.S. Agency for 
International Development, and 
the National Association of 
Foreign Student, Affairs. 



■ 



1 >" ' ■ ' . 









the 




: »r>. 



•>>>: M 




* -i- 



PIN 



NOWl 

30 % 

OFF 

"Sandals" 



for Men & Women 



Also some clogs & shoes 

up to 50% off 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 




•■■,- 



Mr. Joseph Payne, harpsichordist, will perform on campus today, 
putting on a noon music hour in the Student Union Lobby and an 
evening performance at 8 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. 

This is Mr. Payne's first appearance at UMass. Tickets for the 
evening show are available at the Ticketron outlet in the Student 
I nion lobby. The show is free to UMass students with a valid sum- 
mer ID. 



Dollar Rallies 

The U.S. dollar rallied strongly on European foreign exchanges 
Wednesday and the price of gold declined. 

The dollar maintained its upsurge for the second straight day in a 
reflection of determination by European government bankers to pull the 
dollar up from its record lows of last week. 

Confidence in the dollar was boosted by an announcement from the U.S. 
Federal Reserve on Tuesday that state banks in Western Europe and 
Japan are standing by with a fund of almost $18 billion to loan the United 
States on a short-term basis to support the dollar. 

Though the dollar closed generally lower than its peak for the day 
against major European currencies, dealers said it appeared firmer than 
on previous days. 

Dealers were more hesitant, however, about the prospect of a long- 
term dollar resurgence. 

Gold, which normally weakens when the dollar shows signs of 
strengthening, fell back significantly in London and Zurich, the two 
major markets. 

At the close Wednesday, the dollar was being quoted against other 
major currencies as follows. Tuesday's close is in brackets. 

Tokyo: 264.575 yen (262.10). 

Frankfurt: 2.4035 marks (2.3950). 

Zurich: 2.8750 Swiss francs (2.8225). 

Paris: 4.15 French francs (4.0950). 

Milan: 590.10 lire (583.95). 

Brussels: 36.45 Belgian francs (36). 

London: 2.5473 dollars to the pound (2.55285). 






Old 
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RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST S NORTHAMPTON 

W0».-S»T 10 00-8-00 I.lonlnna CRA 1T>-7 

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USED JEANS 2for $ 3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 



WORK SHIRTS 

USED OVERALLS & 
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USED VESTS 



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ARMY PANTS 

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UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 






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Crier Phofo/uiO Fullerton 

Things are a little slow in Amherst during the summer, some of us Just kind of crawl along in the heat. 
This is one of the more harried members of the community, don't bother him or he'll snap at you. 



-*J 



3*4*V 



Nixon Signs SS Hike UYA Grant 

CD U7oeViinofr»n X\ C —IT S Rpi 



President Nixon signed 
legislation Wednesday that will 
increase Social Security benefits 
by 5.6 per cent in mid-1974 - a hike 
he described as "good news for 
millions of our citizens." 

In a statement, Nixon said he 
was extremely pleased to sign the 
Social Security changes, which 
were attached as an amendment to 
a bill extending for one year the 
federal renegotiation act. 

The White House estimated that, 
effective with Social Security 
checks paid out in July of next 
year, monthly benefits will in- 
crease by at least 5.6 per cent and 
could rise by 5.8 per cent, depen- 
ding on computations of living cost 
increases. 

About 30 million Americans 
draw Social Security benefits. 

The White House announced July 
1 that President Nixon had signed 
the legislation but said later the 
announcement was in error. 
Wednesday's action was official. 



To help cover the cost of higher 
benefits, the new law places Social 
Security taxes on annual earnings 
of up to $12,600 effective January 1. 
In the absence of the new law, 
taxable earnings would have risen 
to $12,000 next year. 

"The critical feature of this bill 
for almost 30 million Americans," 
said Nixon, "is an increase in 
Social Security benefits of more 
than 5 per cent next year in order 
to meet the rising costs of living. 

"I have long held that Social 
Security cannot contribute to 
genuine financial security until it 
provides an automatic means of 
compensating for cost-of-living 
increases." 

Congress last year provided for 
automatic increases in benefits as 
living costs rise but this automatic 
feature does not become effective 
until January 1975. 



Washington, DC -U.S. Rep. 
Silvio Conte and Senator Edward 
Brooke Tuesday announced that 
UMass has been awarded a 
$237,430 grant from ACTION, the 
federal agency coordinating all 
federal volunteer activities. 

The grant will support the 
continued operation of UMass' 
University Year For ACTION 
program for one year. 

Under UMass' UYA Program, 
the largest in the country, students 
are given academic credit for work 
performed in community anti- 
poverty agencies. 



UMass 
Police 
5 2121 



Model Cities 
Academy Here 

Amherst, Mass. - Two-hundred 
sixty black eighth-graders from 
the Bedford Stuyvesant, East New 
York and Brownsville sections of 
Brooklyn are studying at a six- 
week Central Brooklyn Model 
Cities Summer Academy at 
UMass. 

Funded by the federal Model 
Cities program and the New York 
City Board of Education, the 
academy will run through Aug. 18. 
Its purpose is to give the students a 
concentrated exposure to such 
academic basics as reading, math 
and sciences and at the same time 
to balance the classroom sessions 
with recreation, sports, crafts and 
outside trips. 

The staff includes 20 teachers 
and 65 aides -college students who 
have tutoring assignments. The 
schedule includes academic work 
until 3 p.m , then recreation from 3 
to 9 p.m. Thursday is a study day 
all day; trips, athletic tournaments 
and special events are scheduled 
on weekends. 



New Evening Hours r able 



S.U. Games Area 

v#%&* Starting Tues., July 17th 






7-10 P.M. 



\ 



4i 



Tues., Wed., Thursday Nights Only 
Daily hours 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 

Rev. Richard E. Koenig, 
Pastor 549-0322 



Joseph 
Payne 

Harpsichordist 



TONIGHT 

8 p.m. 

Bowker 
Auditorium 



Reserve Seat Tickets: 

Free w/UMass Summer 
Student ID 
All others $1.50 

Available at SU Lobby 



Mitchell Defends Self, Nixon 



John N. Mitchell said yesterday President 
Nixon ultimately will defend his own good 
name in the Watergate scandal, and a 
ranking Republican suggested anew that the 
President discuss the case personally with 
investigating senators. 

Mitchell, the former attorney general and 
campaign director, defended himself and 
the President in a second day of televised 
testimony before the Watergate committee. 

Nixon has said he will not appear before 
the panel. 

"I think the good name of the President is 
going to be protected by the facts and by the 
President himself..," Mitchell said. 

Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., R-Tenn., asked 
Mitchell how the panel can get Nixon's 
response to Watergate testimony. "How do 
we get to complete the record in some 
respects?" he asked. 

"I would believe and hope that after your 
hearings are over, the President will 
respond to the salient points of your 
hearing," Mitchell said. 

"You think he should?" Baker asked: 

"I believe that he will," Mitchell said. 

Baker said he knows of no way the com- 
mittee can compel Nixon to testify. But he 



noted that in 1919, President Woodrow 
Wilson, in connection with ratification of the 
Treaty of Versailles, invited the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee to a meeting 
at the White House, where he underwent 
questioning. 

"Would you comment on that as an 
alternative?" Baker asked. 

"I hope you are all invited down to the 
White House, hopefully under the cir- 
cumstances you desire," Mitchell said. 

Nixon has rejected suggestions that he 
testify about Watergate under oath. 

Nixon also refused to supply the panel 
with documents it seeks. The committee had 
been scheduled today to discuss whether to 
issue a subpoena for the sought-after 
papers, but at the last minute put off the 
meeting until Thursday. 

Baker's office said the reason for the 
postponement was that Baker had promised 
to give a news interview at the time 
scheduled for the session. But there was 
immediate speculation that the delay was 
really intended to give the White House 
another day to turn over the papers 
voluntarily and avoid a looming con- 
stitutional confrontation. 



Baker-who has said he communicates 
with the White House through his televised 
remarks-asked Mitchell if he had any 
thoughts on how the committee could obtain 
the evidence it seeks "without an in- 
stitutional confrontation?" 

Mitchell suggested Baker and committee 
Chairman Sam J. Ervin Jr., D-N.C, might 
go to the White House and discuss the 
problem directly with the President. 

Mitchell said that amid the Watergate 
cover-up and the 1972 campaign he did not 
want to jeopardize Nixon's re-election and 
that was his basis for keeping what he knew 
of Watergate and other issues from the 
President. 

"...I still believe that the most important 
thing to this country was the re-election of 
Richard Nixon and I was not about to 
countenance anything that would stand in 
the way of that re-election," Mitchell said. 

He said, however, that he would have 
stopped short of anything involving high 
crimes or treason. 

Baker asked Mitchell whether it would not 
have been better to line up political and 
official aides on the White House lawn and 
unfold the full story of Watergate to Nixon 
immediately. 



But Mitchell said Watergate was not his 
primary concern at the time. "It was what 
we've referred to as the White House 
horrors," he said. 

In that category, Mitchell listed such 
matters as the burglary at the office of 
Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist; attempts at 
forgery of foreign policy papers from the 
Kennedy administration; the International 
Telephone & Telegraph Corp. case involving 
alleged administration favors; surreptitious 
wiretaps ; and a reported suggestion that the 
Brookings Institute in Washington be fire- 
bombed. 

At one point, Mitchell said he believes to 
this day he was right in trying to keep the 
whole story from Nixon. 

Later, under Baker's questioning, he said 
that in hindsight, it now appears it would 
have been better to advise Nixon and let him 
make decisions about what to do. 

"If I could have been assured at that time 
that the President would have been re- 
elected, I'd agree with you wholehear- 
tedly," Mitchell said. 

As for lining up the principals on the White 
House lawn, Mitchell said, "It would have 
been simpler to have shot 'em all." 



News Shorts 

Plane Crash 

A Brazilian jetliner crashed in an onion field and caught fire yesterday 
as the pilot approached Orly Airport for an emergency landing. 

French national police reported 129 of 134 persons aboard were killed. 

The pilot had radioed the Orly tower that he was having engine trouble 
aboard his Varig Airline Boeing 707 flying into Paris from Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. The main Paris airport had been cleared to give him priority 
landing rights. 

But the four-jet airliner plummeted into a field about three miles south 
of Orly, sending up what witnesses described as a huge sheet of flame. 
The plane's wingtips were ripped off but the fuselage remained intact. 

Abortion Clinic 

The Massachusetts Public Health Council has approved plans for an 
abortion clinic in downtown Boston. 

The proposed Charles Circle Clinic at the base of Beacon Hill is the 
third abortion clinic approved in the Boston area and the fourth in the 
state since a U.S. Supreme Court decision struck down state anti-abortion 
laws 

Abortion clinics are currently in operation in the Brighton section of 
Boston and Springfield, and another has been approved in Brookline. 

The Public Health Department says the clinics and hospitals 
throughout the state will be able to perform about 39,700 abortions a year. 
The department predicts an annual demand for about 40,000 abortions in 

Massachusetts. _*_■ _ 

Still Room 

The New England Board of Education says several western 
Massachusetts colleges still have vacancies in their entering freshman 
classes 

The board's annual poll lists Western New England College and 
American International College, both in Springfield, as among the 
region's four-year colleges still taking applications. 

The board also said that openings exist at three two-year colleges-Bay 
Path Junior College, Longmeadow; Springfield Technical Community 
College, Springfield, and Greenfield Community College, Greenfield. 

Music Room 

After receiving several complaints concerning the closing for the 
summer of the music room on the Campus Center Concourse, the Board 
of Governors of the Campus Center is currently considering reopening it 
for most of the summer. Due to the considerable cost of keeping the music 
room open, the CC Board of Governors wishes to find out if there would be 
enough interest in making use of the facility to justify keeping it open. If 
you are interested in reopening the CC music room for the summer, 
please contact Howard Levin in the CC Board office (rm. 817CC) or call 
545-0194. 



Clark To Retire From GCC Board 



Clarence F. Clark, Sunderland, a 
former chairman of the Greenfield 
Community College advisory 
board, is retiring from service on 
that board, President Lewis O. 
Turner announced today. 

Clark was appointed to the 
college advisory board by then 
Governor John A. Volpe in 1968 for 
a five year term. During his tenure 
on the board, the Greenfield 
Community College Foundation, 
Inc. was organized and plans for 
the new campus were developed. 
The advisory board does not 
operate in an official capacity, but 
serves as a liaison between the 
college and the community, ex- 
changing ideas and advice and 
assisting with planning. The 
Foundation was a direct outgrowth 
of the activity of the board. It was 
the Foundation which enabled the 
college to acquire the use of the 
Arch Street facility and the South 
Building on Newell Court. 

Clark served as vice-chairman of 
the advisory board from 1969 to 
1970 and then succeeded Morton 
Slavin of Erving as chairman. 

A native of Sunderland, Clark 
graduated from Massachusetts 
Agricultural College (now the 
University of Massachusetts) in 
1922. Since then he has been far- 
ming in Sunderland, Northampton 
and Maine. 

Married to the former Frances 
Martin of Amherst, the Clarks 
have three grown daughters. Mrs. 
Clark has been active in the 



Massachusetts Federation of 
Women's Clubs and has served as a 
member of the national advisory 
board of women's clubs. 

The first chairman of the ad- 
visory board was John Owens of 
Greenfield. In addition to Owens, 
other former members of the 
advisory board are: Carroll 
Adams, John Bednarski. Robert 
Currier, Philip DeBenedetto, Mary 
Finn, Pauline Goodell, Raymond 
Kinmouth, Albert Lumley, 
Douglas O'Neil, Allan Roberts and 
Roger Sitterly. 

Original members of the ad- 



1st District Schools Get $ 



WASHINGTON, DC, -U.S. Rep. 
Silvio O. Conte, R-Mass., and Sen. 
Edward W. Brooke today an- 
nounced that five colleges in the 
First Congressional District and 
the three campuses of the 
University of Massachusetts have 
been awarded Veterans Cost of 
Instruction Program awards 
totaling $159,241.06. UMass 
received over $133,000. 

Under the program, authorized 
by the Education Amendments of 
1972, educational institutions which 
increase their enrollment of 
veterans by 10 percent over the 
previous year and who meet other 
requirements of the legislation are 
entitled to payments for veterans 
enrolled in undergraduate 



Creation 

Antiques 

Inventory sale, 
Antique clothes 
drastically reduced] 
jewelry, too. 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy * trad*, too. 



programs. The program is 
designed to provide an incentive 
for the institutions to seek out 
veterans and to assist them in 
providing special services for 
veterans. 

Conte fought in the Labor- 
Health, Education and Welfare 
Appropriations Subcommittee, on 
which he serves, against the Ad- 
ministration proposed rescission of 
the $25 million appropriated for the 
program in Fiscal Year 1973 and 
was successful in assuring ex- 
penditure of the funds. 



When, in making its Fiscal Year 
1974 budget request, the Ad- 
ministration made no provision for 
funding the program, Conte, who 
serves as the national chairman of 
the National League of Cities/US. 
Conference of Mayors Special 
Veterans Education Committee, 
went back to his subcommittee and 
succeeded in adding funds for the 
program to the Labor-Health, 
Education and Welfare Ap- 
propriations Bill which was passed 
by the House last week. 



GLENDALE COLLEGE 
OF LAW 



• A Degree Progrom Qualifying Graduates For Calif. BorExam 

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• Enrollment Now Being Accepted For September Term 

• Inquiries Are Invited By The Dean Of Admissions 



GLENDALE COLLEGE OF LAW 
220 NO. GLENDALE AVE 
GLENDALE, CA. 91 206 



(213)247-0770 



visory board still serving are: 
Frederick Dunn, Grace Mayers, 
and Morton Slavin. 

The membership of the current 
advisory board is: Erie Witty, 
Orange, chairman, Mrs. Grace 
Mayers, Greenfield, vice- 
chairman; Morton Slavin, Erving, 
secretary-treasurer; Mrs. 
Raymond Parenteau, Northfield; 
Dr. Robert Davies, Greenfield; 
Frederick A. Dunn, Greenfield; 
Dr. Ward M. Hunting, New Salem; 
Attorney Andrew Siegel, Nor- 
thampton: and John H. Williams, 
Rowe. 



"Butterflies" In Final Week 

GREENFIELD, MASS.... "Butterflies Are Free", the Broadway 
comedy by Leonard Gershe, is in its final week at Arena Civic Theatre at 
the Roundhouse, Franklin County Fairgrounds in Greenfield. 

The recent New York success is a heart-warming play with a fine comic 
sense and is easily the most populai choice of summer theater producers 
this year. There are few companies that are not offering "Butterflies Are 
Free" in their schedule of plays this summer. 

The Arena Civic Theatre production is produced by Ann Christern and 
directed by Nick Orzell who has worked in the professional theater for 
many years as both actor and director. He has been associated with 
Joseph Chaikin's Open Theatre in New York, with Cafe La Mama, 
Theatre Genesis^nd other Off-Broadway companies. He has been active 
on the west coast and has done a great deal of television. 

The setting and lighting has been designed by Brian Marsh, technical 
director and designer for ACT this summer. Costumes have been coor- 
dinated by Doe Labbeeand Sally Wright. Martha Lapointe is in charge of 
properties and Gary Thompson is working as production stage manager. 
Lighting operators are Michael Case and Rob Crosby. 

The cast is headed by Jeffrey Ryan as the boy, with Theresa Drapeau 
as the girl, Norma Bialas as the mother and Charles Koro as the Off- 
Broadway producer. 



Radio /hack 

of AMHERST 

318 COLLEGE ST. - RTE. No. 9 

One Mile East of Amherst College 
Where Everyone Meets To See, Hear 
and Purchase SOUND - - On The Go Or To Live-In 

Radios - Stereos - Phones 
Tape Players and Recorders 

HOURS: 10 to 5:30 M0N. - THURS. 
10 to 8 Friday 
9 9 to 5 SATURDAY 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



Page 6— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 

Cancer Treatment 
More Accessible 



The government moved today to 
make recent life-giving advances 
in cancer treatment more widely 
available to people throughout the 
United States. 

The advances, especially with 
the use of anticancer drugs, con- 
cern three specific forms of cancer 
- a form of leukemia called acute 
lymphocytic leukemia; Hodgkin's 
disease, a cancer of the lymph 
nodes; and lymphomas' cancer of 
the tissue other than Hodgkin's. 

Advanced drug treatment of 
cancer usually develops in major 
medical centers and there is a lag 
between development and the time 
new treatments reach the general 
public and the average physician. 

To speed up dissemination of 
these new techniques, the 
government is setting up seven 
regional centers - demonstration 
projects - through which it can 
reach some 120 hospitals across the 
country with this new information. 

The contracts for these projects 
total nearly $2 million. 

Dr. Frank J. Ra use her Jr., 
director of America's recently 

U1MUA 

INTERNATIONAL MUSIC 
Monday evening, July 16, at 8 
p.m., WMUA's international music 
series will feature "High Life" 
music from West Africa. Godwin 
Oyewole will join host Joe C. to 
provide commentary with em- 
phasis on artists from his native 
Nigeria. 



stepped-up $500 million a year 
national cancer program, made 
the announcement at a seminar on 
health for medical writers staged 
jointly by the White House and the 
Health, Education and Welfare 
Department. 

Rauscher, who also is director of 
the National Cancer Institute, 
addressed newsmen at the in- 
stitute's new laboratories at the 
one-time biological warfare 
research center of the Army at Ft. 
Detrick. 

He said that acut lymphocytic 
Leukemia, Hodgkins Disease and 
non-Hodgkins' lymphomas have 
been chosen for the demonstration 
program because "recent ad- 
vances in treatment - particularly 
with anti-cancer drugs - have 
greatly improved survival times 
for patients receiving such 
treatment." 

Under the contracts announced 
today seven primary hospitals will 
act through regional networks of 
contributing hospitals to demon- 
strate to community physicians 
and other health workers the most 
helpful treatment for the three 
diseases chosen. 

Rauscher said the seven regional 
programs are intended to deliver 
the best possible concer treatment 
at the community level. 

The seven primary hospitals 
including their contract awards for 



the first year are: 

Childrens Hospital of Los 
Angeles which will receive a 
$229,573 contract; Childrens 
Hospital Medical Center, Cin- 
cinnati, $218,171; Dartmouth 
Medical School, Hanover, N.H., 
$128,054; University of Alabama 
Medical Center, Birmingham, 
$356,675; Childrens Hospital of 
Denver, $211,454; New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, 
New York City, $486,097; and Mt. 
Sinai School of Medicine, New 
York City, $308,138. 



How To Beat Prices 

There's apparently a complainer 
in Reading who thinks he may have 
the answer to beating the rising 
cost of food. 

An unidentified caller telephone 
radio station WVBF in 
Framingham Tuesday com- 
plaining about the high cost of food 
and saying he had broken into a 
diner in Reading where he had 
cooked up some bacon and eggs. 

The caller also complained that 
he couldn't find the coffee and had 
to drink water instead. 

Police were notified of the 
telephone call and later confirmed 
that the diner, which was closed for 
vacation, had been broken into and 
a meal had been cooked. 



FBI To Watch 
Computer System 

The Justice Department will take steps to insure that the FBI crime 
computer system does not infringe on individual rights, Atty. Gen. Elliot 
L. Richardson pledged today. 

In a letter to Massachusetts Gov. Francis W. Sargent, Richardson said, 
"Appropriate operational and legislative safeguards have and will 
continue to be instituted as necessary to guarantee the integrity of the 
National Crime Information System." 

He said he is reviewing proposed legislation which would provide 
safeguards for persons affected by the computer system. He did not 
elaborate. 

Sargent wrote Richardson June 13 expressing concern that adequate 
precautions might not be taken. 

He referred to his state's development of a crime information system 
that is designed to mesh with the FBI system. 

"The Massachusetts criminal information system has been designed to 
provide internal and external safeguards against potential abuse," he 
wrote. "Unfortunately, I have seen no similar action on the part of the 
Department of Justice, the Attorney General or the FBI to construct 
equivalent safeguards for a national criminal information system." 

He voiced doubt that internal controls and self restraint by those 
operating the system "can guarantee the integrity of something as 
sensitive and potentially abusive as an interfacing national-state 
criminal information computer system. 

Sargent said he was reluctant to encourage Massachusetts to join in the 
national system until he sees evidence of sufficient protection for in- 
dividual rights. 

In his response, Richardson said he understands that a number of other 
problems are blocking Massachusetts participation in the national 
system. 



AIR COND. 



NOW! 




AMHERSTC^wa 

AMITY ST. , AMHERST 



SodiaGoraieousKd 



253-5426 



"A sheer delight! 

—JUDITH CHI ST. New York Magazine 
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents 

, FRANCOIS TRUFFAULu. 

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I ROD 
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White House Religion | Mahnken At U of D 



As the Watergate scandal unfolds, moral theologians cite a kind of 
"White House religion"-a personalized piety detached from its social 
demands-as a factor in the affair. 

It's a common American style of religion, focused on the individual's 
status but without corollary application to the corporate system or 
political sphere. 

"Keep religion out of politics," goes its shibboleth. Some Internal 
Revenue Service investigations of socially active religious bodies have 
tended toward trying to impose such a rule. 

It "seeks salvation of souls but allows the damnation of society" says 
the Rev. Gabriel Fackre, of Andover Newton Theological School in 
Massachusetts, adding that it has been fostered as a "White House 

religion." ... 

Rabbi Balfour Brickner, a Reform Jewish scholar, says it stems from 
evangelistic revivalism, which separates religion from "affairs of the 
market place, the courthouse, the political arena or the business office." 

"Watergate has shown the fallacy of this attitude," he adds. "It may 
also restore social action to the churches and synagogues of America." 

He says "big daddies' who promise 'law and order' and then make a 
mockery" of it are "no more the answer to American problems than are 
the religious saviors who beguile their constituents to believing there can 
be salvation... disassociated from the pursuit of justice." 

A Baptist pastor, the Rev. Peter McLeon, of Waco, Tex., referring to 
the frequent White House religious services at which President Nixon 
serves as a sort of master of ceremonies, put it this way : 

"What I want to know is this. What were all those preachers doing in the 
White House on Sunday morning? What were they preaching? ' ' 

The Rev. Dr. Phillip Potter, general secretary of the World Council of 
Churches, says that "in Watergate, we have cleancut, good-looking 
people," devoted to private religion, "but who seem to be defective in 
moral sensitivity." 

One of these admittedly involved in the Watergate coverup, Jeb Stuart 
Magruder, deputy campaign director for Nixon, claimed in testimony to 
Senate investigators he was matching conduct of a former ethics teacher. 

The teacher, the Rev. William Sloan Coffin of Yale University, had 
taken part in illegal resistance to the Vietnam war, Magruder said, and 
so he reasoned he should break laws to conceal Watergate. 

However, the Rev. Mr. Coffin quickly replied that his resistance to the 
war like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s defiance of segregation laws, was 
purposely open, intended publicly to challenge conditions viewed as 
wrong, a nd not a hidden conspiracy to cover up wrongdoing. 

In one case, as in Jesus' violation of certain laws, the object is openly to 
bring greater justice, the Rev. Mr. Coffin said, and not to pervert it, as in 
the Watergate case. 



Harry Mahnken, faculty director 
and professor in the department of 
theatre at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, is a 
member of the University of 
Delaware 1973 Summer Festival of 
the Arts company. 

At the U. of D., he served as 
director of the festival's first 
summer production, "Stop the 
World - 1 Want to Get Off," one of 
Broadway's greatest musicals, 
with book, music and lyrics by 
Leslie Bricusse and Anthony 
Newley. 

A member of the American 
Theatre Assn., Mahnken served for 
about five years as executive 
director of the Summer Repertory 



Theatre at the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Prior to that he was on the 
faculty at the University of Rich- 
mond in Virginia. 

At the University * of 
Massachusetts, he has directed 
productions of "The Journey of the 
Fifth Horse" and "The Glass 
Menagerie." He also acted in "The 
Lady's Not For Burning." 



Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 



Crossword Puzzle 



Notices 




"Sandals" 



Men & Women 



A pianist is needed to accompany 
films of Buster Keaton and Rudolf 
Valentino at UMass Tuesday, July 
31. Persons interested in playing 
for the silent film classics "The 
General" (with Keaton) and 
"Blood and Sand" (with Valentino) 
are asked to contact Rosa Blanco 
or Joy Harris at the UMass Student 
Activities Office, 2nd floor, Student 

Union. 

» * » 

Amherst, Mass. -"Rainbow 
Festival" will give area artisans 
the opportunity to demonstrate 
their crafts and sell their wares at 
UMass Wednesday, Aug. 1. In- 
terested artisans are asked to 
contact Rosa Blanco or Joy Harris 
in the Student Activities Office, 
Student Union, UMass. The 
Festival will also include music, 

poetry readings, and films. 

* • * 

Thursday, July 12, Canoeing on 
Lake Warner leaves at 5:30 p.m. 
from Bus Circle in front of Stock- 
bridge Hall. 

Weekend Trip Friday Night, July 
13, to Sunday July 15, Caving Trip 
to New York. 



Classifieds 



FOR SALE 

Refrigerator for Sale: Sears 8 cu ft. Like 
new. Paid $130. Sell for M0. Call 665 3546 I 
after 12 noon. 

T7/12 

FOR SALE 
TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 1218 
auto changer, Sony TC-55 port cassette, 
EICO 427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5171. 

17/12 

FOR SALE 

1967 Mustang, VI, AT, Air Cond., PS., 
57,000 miles, Excellent running cond 568 
7521. 

T7/12 

BABYSITTER* 

Parents Can't find a reliable babysitter? 
Tired of high fees? Call the Child Care 
Exchange 586 2224. Playgroups also. 

T7/12 

MONEY 

Earn S2.00 for participating in a Psychology 
Experiment. Requires 1 hour, no noxious 
stimuli. Call Shirley at 545 0071 for Apt. 

T7/19 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Room available immediately: own 
bedroom in 5 room apt. with large kitchen. 
Walk to school Only $75/mo., all utll. Call 
549 6013 morn 

M7/19 

DRIVER WANTED 

To Miami area at the end of July. Call 549 
1532 or 1 783 2456. 

tf 7/24 



Check Outing Club Bulletin 
Board in Student Union opposite 
Ticket office for further details and 
other trips and check locker door 
for equipment rental and return 
hours. 



ACROSS 

1 Suffix 

adherent of 
4 Steamship 

(abbr.) 
6 Transactions 
11 Enthusiasm 
13 All 

15 Parent (colloq.) 

16 Last king of 

Troy 

18 Cry of Bac- 

chanals 

19 Nanoor sheep 

21 Heraldry: 

grafted 

22 Compass point 

23 Forest wardens 
26 The urial 

29 Let it stand 
31 Location 

33 Preposition 

34 A continent 

(abbr.) 

35 Ancient 

38 Scottish cap 

39 Symbol for 
niton 

40 Man s 
nickname 

4 1 Jumbled type 
43 Greek letter 
45 Fondle 
47 Precious stone 
50 Hypothetical 

force 

52 Appellation of 
Athena 

53 Obscure 
56 Roman states- 
man 

58 Approaches 

60 Prefix: with 

61 Puffed up 
63 Sounded a 

horn 

65 Insects 

66 Indefinite arti- 
cle 

67 Poem 



DOWN 

1 Doctrines 

2 Reach across 

3 Note of scale 

4 Enticing 

woman 

5 Prick painfully 

6 Fault 

7 Printers 

measure 

8 Solar disk 

9 Dwells 

10 Theater sign 

(abbr.) 
12 Regius 

Professor 

(abbr.) 
14 College degree 

(abbr.) 
17 The sweetsop 
20 Exist 

24 Above and 

touching 

25 Music: as writ- 

ten 







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27 Clue 

28 Pilaster 

29 Break suddenly 

30 Story 

32 Man's name 

36 Falsehood 

37 Requires 

42 Erase (printing) 
44 Unusual 
46 Sum 

48 Lasso 

49 Mans name 



51 Lavish fond- 
ness on 

54 Covered with 

frosting 

55 Fashion 

56 Symbol for 

cerium 

57 Man's 

nickname 
59 Conjunction 
62 Babylonian 

deity 
64 Preposition 

T3 




Page 8 — University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Fairbanks : Man With A Mission ( All-Purpose Trivia Quiz 



By MIKE BROPHY 

Chuck Fairbanks is a typical 
mid-western type of man. He has 
moved to New England to take on a 
new business adventure in making 
a winner out of the New England 
Patriots Football team. He comes 
from the Big Eight Conference 
where he amassed a 52-15-1 record 
over six seasons as the head of the 
Sooners of Oklahoma. He soon 
became a deity to the people of 
Oklahoma and is sure to be missed 
at the sidelines in the mid-west. 

With him he brings his frank and 
positive line of thinking. He is here, 
first of all, to start the team 
thinking as one mind on the field. 
And this takes discipline. Lots of 
discipline. Both on his part. . and 
the part of his players and new 
staff. So far, so good. The players 
have caught on and seem to enjoy 
working for the man. They 
reported to camp in top condition 
thanks to Fairbanks' off-season 
training program. 

A graduate of Michigan State, he 
returned there in 1955 to com- 
mence his coaching career as a 
graduate assistant to head coach 
Duffy Daugherty during the spring 

Patriots 
Trivia Quiz 

To break away from baseball. . 
readers will be given an op- 
portunity to test their knowledge of 
New England's pro football team 
that is training on campus for the 
next four weeks. 

1 ) Who was the first draft choice 
ever selected by the then Boston 
Patriots 9 

2) On December 20, 1959 the 
Patriots signed their first player in 
the new American Football 
League, who was he and what 
position did he play? 

3) Name the first head coach to 
be hired by the Patriots in 1960. 

4) When did the Patriots first 
hold training camp on the UMass 
campus and how many candidates 
showed to have a try at making the 
team 9 

5» Before moving to Schaefer 
Stadium in 1971 the Pats had two 
previous homes in the Boston area. 
Name both sites. 

61 What is the highest point total 
ever scored by the Pats in a single 
game' , 

7 • Three jersey numbers have 
been retired from service by the 
Patriots. Name the numbers and 
the three Pat greats who wore 
them. 

8' Other than members of given 
specialty teams there is only one 
man on the Pats roster that has 
played in excess of ten years in the 
pro leagues Name this man and 
state his position. 

9 1 One of the famous "no- 
namers" of Miami once played 
defense for the Pats Name him. 

1 (I i Who was the last Patriot to be 
named an All-Pro? 



drills. His first full time job came 
at Ishpeming High School in 
Michigan that fall where he 
remained for two season. Then on 
to Arizona State and Houston 
before moving to Oklahoma where 
he took over the top job in 1967. 

While at Oklahoma, he guided 
twelve Sooners to All-American 
status and secured two Big Eight 
Titles and tied for a third. 

For a new man to come in and 
take over a job that demands so 
much takes pure determination, he 
must have a positive attitude. 
"Give 110% all of the time and 
you'll be a winner," says the new 
mentor. And he has the personality 
that makes men want to give 110% 
for him every day on the field. 

Oneness is his basic theme as it 
is oneness that builds a winning 



club. He strives for solidarity and 
firmly believes in esprit de corps to 
the end. 

With his returning veterans 
having arrived in camp yesterday, 
he will have the first chance to look 
at all of his raw material he had to 
work with in searching out a 
championship. Perhaps his biggest 
test will be that of building an 
offensive line that will blow the 
opposition out of the way and keep 
Plunkett on his feet. The bodies 
and minds are there. All that 
remains at this time is to put them 
together as one mean unit that will 
be feared across the League. 

From here on out. . the two a 
day workouts will be going full tilt 
to weed out the dead weight and to 
mold a winner. Practices are at 10 
and 3:40 daily and the public is 
invited to attend. 



1 ) How far did the ball bounce after Red Sox catcher Bob Tillman 
hit John Wyatt in the head trying to throw out a runner stealing 
second? 

2) Which famous Boomtown character did Larry Eishenhauer 
tackle while filming a commercial? 

3) Which Massachusetts town did ex-Patriot Harry "The 
Thump" Crump come from? 

4) What was the name of the bread which came out after the 1967 
Impossible Dream season and featured a Red Sox player? 

5) True or False. The championship trophy of the Southern 
Hockey League is called the "Dixie Cup." 

6) Who was the Red Sox manager who failed to stop after running 
down four roadworkers on a Louisiana highway and spent a couple 
of years in the pokey? 

7) Match these all-time Boston greats with their teams 

1. Gene Guarilia 

2. Murray Wall 

3. Bob Yates 

4. Joe Watson 

8) Multiple choice. Bobby Ring was 

A. A local boy who had a tryout with the Patriots in 1966. 

B. A Red Sox emergency call-up of 1964 who played second base. 

C. A Bruins goalie for about nine minutes in 1965. 



Schubert Makes Camp 



Answers 



SAN DIEGO -Steve Schubert, 
former wide receiver from the 
Yankee Conference Minutemen of 
Massachusetts arrived at training 




camp in fine shape Wednesday, 
according to Assistant Coach 
Willie Wood. 

Schubert signed with the 
Chargers of the AFC late in the 
Spring after Wood had toured the 
spring camp of the Minutemen 
checking out the prospects, namely 
Peil Pennington. 

He will be trying out for the wide 
receiver position but cannot afford 
to be choosy and will "Play 
wherever they want me to," he 
said. 

While at UMass Steve set all new 
pass receiving records as he was 
on the receiving end of the greatest 
quarterback to play for UMass, 
since the day of Greg Landry, in 
Peil Pennington. "He has the best 
pair of hands I've ever seen and his 
speed doesn't leave much to be 
desired," according to UMass 
coach Dick MacPherson. 



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Numbers Are Losers 



Local Lacrosse 



No. the New England Patriots 
are not the only competition 
around this summer. And if they 
met this adversary, they say there 
wouldn't be any competition at all. 
But sport is sport. 

And so if you're interested in 
lacrosse indian style, the Amherst 
Lacrosse- Club, a motly crew of 
jocks consisting mostly of local 
college talent mainly UMass, will 
open their home season outside 
Alumni Stadium this Sunday af- 
ternoon at 2 p.m. hosting the 
Needham Lacrosse Club. 



On the season Amherst is so far 
2-0 winning road contests with 
Longmeadow and Needham in a 
July 4th festival game. The club 
will be home the next two Sundays 
with Winchester and Simsbury, Ct. 
at the Stadium. 

So it's a bottle of choice Cherry, 
some sunshine, and some lacrosse 
with the Amherst College Club this 
Sunday at the Stadium at 2 p.m. 
The walk will do you good if the 
wine and the game don't. . . . 



MIAMI -If Charley Wade took 
numerology seriously he wouldn't 
even be at the Miami Dolphins' 
training camp. 

His numbers are losers. 

The wide receiver was the 442d 
and last player chosen in this 
year's draft. And at 5-foot-9 1/2, 160 
pounds, he is barely bigger than 
Miami kicker Garo Yepremian, 
and seemingly too small for the 
NFL. 

"In junior high school, I turned 
my attention to football because I 
liked the feeling of being small and 
making big men look silly," said 
Wade, a Nashville, Tenn. native 
who turned down a contract offer 
from baseball's A's when he 
graduated from high school. He 
still feels the same way. 

The rigorous workouts of coach 
Don Shula have already resulted in 

1 1th draft pick Chris Kete of Boston 
College, a center, and free agents 
Greg Garton, a guard from Nor- 
thern Illinois, and running back 
John Ferl calling it quits. 



"It's not hard," maintains Wade. 
"It's just consistent, always doing 
something. I like it here, and I plan 
on staying here." 

Wade said he quit football 
himself when he was a freshman 
defensive back at Tennessee State 
because he didn't like the head 
tackles demanded by the coaches. 
He rejoined the squad as a wide 
receiver the next season after a 
coach spotted him catching passes 
one day. 

Wade must compete with "my 
idol, Paul Warfield," and veterans 
Howard Twilley, Ron Sellers and 
Marlin Briscoe for a job. 

But with reasoning to match his 
9.5 second speed over 100 yards, he 
said, "I feel age is against them. 
They can't play forever." 

He figures he has an added 
advantage because he can return 
punts and kickoffs, explaining, 
"They've had two starters, Jake 
Scott and Dick Anderson, doing it. 
If they get hurt, it's too much to 
replace." 



<l-MCO.»T t \ /CONTACTS. 
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[«t»:(NCT J 1 APPLIES F 




l!».*i Nnrfli IMruo.inf *t., \nilirrsf 



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Amherst s Tire Store- 
Firestone Shell Jetzon 




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Le Havre Rodiol Tires Steel Belted 



Professional American & 
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Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPIM 24 HOURS 



m 



Te»«m 




BLUE WALL 
JULY 1U12«'3 
9:00 • 1:00 



NO COVER 




July 17. 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



JUL 171973 

UWVE'HSFTY OF 

MA^.^IUSETTS 




Summer Counseling: 
Mission Impossible 



By STEVE HIGGLES 

The most active program on 
campus during the summer 
months is not summer school. 
Although one might think so. 
neither is it the Patriots summer 
training camp at the stadium. In 
terms of numbers, the Summer 
Counseling Program involves close 
to 5000 freshmen, transfer 
students, counselors, advisors. 
Deans, Heads of Residences, 
administrators, and various other 
staff personnel throughout the 
University. 

The Summer Counseling 
Program has three basic goals. 
First, the program strives to 
acquaint the new student with the 
University's resources (physical, 
academic, and student living) in 
the process of preregistration. The 
Program also tries to prepare the 
incoming student for what they will 
face in September, stressing the 
need for assertive behaviors, and 
outlining coping materials. Third, 
the program attempts to present 
the University in a realistic 
positive way. To make them feel 
comfortable about entering -even 
looking forward to September. 

An emphasis is placed on more 
and better use of "small groups'' 
for follow up and academic ad- 
vising and for facilitating freedom 



among freshmen. Emphasis is also 
placed on more planned informal 
activities that enhance interaction. 

The basic staff of the Summer 
Counseling Program consists of a 
director and an assistant director, 
eight logistics staff members who 
keep the program running behind 
the scenes, a media specialist, and 
29 student counselors. Also in- 
cluded are hundreds of University 
employees ranging from Vice- 
Chancellor Gage to the Janitors of 
the quad dorms who have a finger 
in the Summer Counseling pie. 

Ms. Sally Hamilton, director of 
the New Students Program, finds 
the job a full-time year-round 
position. Ms. Hamilton is 
ultimately responsible for most 
aspects of the Summer Coup ,eling 
Program. It is her job to sift 
through the scores of aprications 
to find the staff counselors who she 
feels will best do the job. She 
personally trains her counselors, 
and oversees the whole program. 

Although all staff members of 
the program are indespensible, the 
group of people who come most in 
contact with the new students are 
the 32 counselors and staff 
members who live in the dor- 
mitories with the new students. On 
the counseling staff there is one 
Sophomore, eleven Juniors, twelve 



Seniors, and five post-graduates. 
There are counselors from all of 
the schools ana colleges within the 
University with most of the majors 
within the College of Arts and 
Sciences being represented. It is 
the responsibility of these coun- 
selors to show the students around 
the University, begin academic 
advising, and to act as resource 
people for the incoming students. 
By the time the summer is over, 
these counselors are experts in the 
arts of filling out OSCAR forms, 
giving campus tours, narrating 
slide shows, living on four or five 
hours sleep, and dealing with 
freshmen who do not want to be 
here. 

When a new student arrives on 
the first night of counselling, 
he/she is given a course 
description book, a course 
schedule book, a University 
Directions, and several other 
booklets, pamphlets and in- 
formation sheets. 

After a meeting with corridor 
counselors to discuss the schedule 
for the three days, living 
guidelines, and security 
procedures, the students go to a 
second meeting with counselors 
who are in their major, or who 
have been trained in that student's 
(Continued on P. 4) 



Field Occupied 
But Quiet Now 

By CYNTHIA ROGERS 

As one enters Field House on Orchard Hill, one can't help noticing the 
quiet, almost foreboding atmosphere which is non-existant during the 
regular school year. Less than 200 summer school students, CCEBS, and 
those working on Orientation live there this summer. 

Living there as opposed to off-campus avoids the hassles of looking 
for an apartment, possible parental pressure, and transportation dif- 
ficulties. With the small number of people living in the dorm, most of the 
students have singles, and if they were smart enough to bring fans, they 
can well avoid the sweltering heat. 

Although the session started off in an unfriendly fashion, relationships 
between people are steadily improving. Because of the small number, the 
students have to make a special effort to meet other people, throughout 
the entire dorm. One of the best areas of social interaction is the rec room 
which is being utilized far more than during the school year. With a color 
tv, ping pong, and pool tables, what more does one need to escape from 
the tedious studying? Although some of the students use the redecorated 
corridor lounges, for card games and bull-shit sessions. 

There are dorm activities planned for the summer. The alloted $1600 
dollars is being used for 2 concerts, films, a dorm bar-b-q, transportation 
to Lenox and for whatever else that may come. However since most of the 
students take off on weekends, consideration of planning for week ac- 
tivities seems likely. 

This summer, Field House appears to be an apathetic dorm. But what 
can be expected of students who carry a workload of three courses a day? 
Most of the students seem to be happy where they are, and it has been 
said that the food in the dining commons is actually decent. 

UYA Positions Open 

University Year for ACTION has announced that qualified students 
may still apply for positions as UYA Volunteers in Phase V of the UYA 
program. 

The University of Massachusetts UYA program places students in full- 
time positions that are serving the low-income and institutionalized pop- 
ulation of western Massachusetts. UYA Volunteers work full-time for one 
year, and receive a living allowance and thirty (30) credits from the 
University. 

Already, 56 students have entered Phase V of the UYA program, and 
have begun a month of on-the-job training at their respective agencies. 
Positions remain open at: The New England Farm Workers Council; the 
Springfield Girls' Club Family Center; the Springfield Hospitals Project; 
the City-Wide Public Housing Tenants Organization, Springfield; Nor- 
thern Worcester County Legal Services, Fitchburg; and Northampton 
State Hospital. 

UYA Volunteers must be full-time, registered students at any of the 
five area colleges. They must receive medical and legal clearance from 
the Office of Citizen Placement, Washington, D.C., and academic ap- 
proval from the dean of their respective school. 

Further information may be obtained by contacting Bruce Shefshick at 
545-1381 . 

$150,000 Hassle 

The University of Massachusetts graduate school dean says it's "un- 
fortunate" that the American Legion disapproves of the purchase of a 
collection of unpublished papers of a black civil rights leader. 

Dr. Mortimer H. Appley made the remark in response to the passage 
Saturday of a Legion resolution condemning the university for its 
decision to spend $150,000 to acquire unpublished letters and manuscripts 
of the late WEB. Dubois, a founder of the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People who was known for his leftist political 
beliefs. 

The resolution was passed at the Legion's 55th annual state convention 
held in Springfield. 

Dr. Appley said the university plans to publish a 10-volume series of the 
Dubois papers. 

He said the cost of the acquisition wouldn't be borne entirely by 
Massachusetts taxpayers. The university was lining up foundation grants 
to help pay for the papers, purchased from Dubois' widow, who now lives 
in Egypt, he said. 




Haywood Hale Broun (above) sports commentator with CBS will 
be speaking next Monday in the Campus Center. See p. 6 for story. 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 






M The" 

Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Steve Ruggles 

John Neister 

Cynthia Rogers 




Sam's calling all his friends to 
tell them about the Crier and how 
they can work for it by coming to 
Room 402 Student Union or calling 
545-0617. How about you? 



******************************* 




Letters Policy 



The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



Zamir Nestelbaum 



Patriots Is Pretty! 



It has come to my attention that there is tremen- 
dous apathy among the students, staff and faculty of 
this University toward the rights of a beleagered 
minority right in our own Amherst, temporarily 
residing here. This minority has for the past 12 years 
been kicked, gouged, run over, ignored, laughed at, 
ridiculed and discriminated against. They are of 
course the New England, nee Boston, Patriot Foot- 
ball Club, or at least pretenders to that title. Like any 
group the Patriots have their own proud history of 
ineptness, stupidity, greed, graft and corruption. It is 
our duty as citizens to know this history to run 
workshops against AntiPatriotism, to cry out as those 
who cry out Black is Beautiful, Patriots is Pretty! ! ! ! 
I will try to recap this saga as I remember it. 

No team accumulating such a record as the 
Patriots could have done it without the stellar con- 
tributions of several key players. They were led to the 
bottom by none other than Mike "I can throw as good 
as Joe" Taliaferro. With Gone were Graham and 
Colclough and in their place were Sid "Hands of 
Steel" Blanks and Gino "Speed Merchant" Cap- 
palletti. The Jim Nance of 1966 was replaced by a new 
one, who traded yardage for pounds and whose high 
point of the season came when he was thrown for only 
a one yard loss by the potent Buffalo Bill Defense. 
Later cameHubie "Throw it to me" Bryant. The 
kicking game during these years was the most 
glorious aspect of the Patriot's long and glorious 
history. Big Gino had lost all feeling in his right foot 
by 1967 and forgot how to hit field goals over 30 yards. 
So he never tried them that long. Also Gino forgot that 
the ball was supposed to go through the uprights and 
over the bar. Gino started missing them from the 7, 
the 15, the 20, the 25, the 30 -- he would not 
discriminate against any distance. Especially 
memorable was his 14 yard miss against the N.Y. 
Football Giants (may their name be obliterated from 
the face of the earth). I recall a game in 1968 against 
the Bills at B.C. where I sat in the second row of the 
endzone, right next to the edge, 20 yards away from 
the near goal post - laterally, and I got my hand on a 
Gino extra point. The punting game during these 
years was handled by none other than Tom "Shank" 
Janik who sported a fine 23 yard average after 
several seasons. Gino was finally replaced b> Pete 
Gogolak who was known for his booming kickoffs to 
the 30, with gale winds at his back. 

But the story of the Patriots is told in their legends. 
The greatest of these was The Living Legend Himself 



- Tom Funchess. Tom "Hands" Funchess was the 
epitome of the anti-Lineman. Again and again Patriot 
gains and Touchdown were called back because of his 
holding penalties. The words "Touchdown!!! But 
Wait, Flag on the Play, FUNCHESS IS HOPPING 
MAD, HOLDING AGAIN!!!" resounded unendingly 
from the golden throat of announcer Bob Starr. 
Funchess set a League record for Holdings during 
gains and scores. His instructional book "How I Held 
My Own In The NFL" was gipping success selling 
millions. His second book, "Grab Toward Daylight", 
clutched the True Meaning. . . Other Legends were 
Ed Toner who set the record of coming to six 
preseason camps without ever making the squad. 
Then there was "Marvelous" Mel Witt who after a 
five year career as reserve lineman on the worst line 
in football, was still making rookie mistakes. The 
current Patriot Legend is Larry "The Man" Carwell, 
the Man they throw at. Look for Carwell on the other 
side of the field on sweeps toward his side. 

But without doubt, most of the credit for the Plight 
of the Patriots lies with the Coaching and General 
Managing. Clive "I'm a nervous guy and don't make 
fun of my name" Rush, George "That's my boy with 
the Jets" Sauer, John "Bulldog" Mazur, the self 
styled Drill Instructor, and Upton "I come from a 
football family" Bell are responsible. This crew 
traded away Nick Buonticonti (for Kim Hammond), 
Jim Whalen (for Tom Beer), Jim Cheyunski (for a 
Buffalo Bill jockstrap), Carl Garret, Ron Sellers (for 
a Cowboy season ticket for Billy Sullivan), Bull 
Bramlett (for a Green Bay salami), Houston Ant- 
wine, Babe Parilli, Fred Dryer and Phil Olsen (for 
Rick Cash, five nude photos of Lance Rentzel, and an 
"I Root for the Rams" button, for a net total minus. 
Furthermore, through inept bungling and sorry 
management, the Patriots have lost allstars Joe 
Kapp, Steve Kiner, Duane Thomas, Phil Olsen, Fred 
Dryer, Mike Ballou, Darrell Johnson, and others. 

Currently the Patriots are run by Chuck "My game 
is Defense" Fairbanks, the ex Sooner who drafted 14 
offensive players out of 17 choices, but despite this 
will try to lead them to better times. But while 60,000 
screaming idiots guzzle down their Schaefer Beer 
every Sunday and Billy "I Love Boston" Sullivan 
counts the cash intake, we can sit back, relax, close 
our eyes, and dream of the glorious past, reflect on 
the wonder of it all, and ask ourselves how it could 
have happened. Remember, PATRIOTS IS PRET- 
TY !!!!!! 



Letters To The Editor 



Film Coop : Trying To Get It Together 



To the Public: 

Film as an art or as an en- 
tertainment is a very fragile thing. 
Today it is in vogue among the 
intellectuals and the popular 
masses alike. Though TV has taken 
over much of our taste, it has also 
perverted it. We like violence (they 
tell us) and we like weak plots 
( they tell us ) . Good movies are still 
made, but they are not shown in 
Western Massachusetts for lack of 
sufficient theatres willing to take 
the risk on them. Quite rightfully 
so, I might add, because it seems 
that even in this "educated" area 
we still pack em in at "Massage 
Parlor 73" but leave the goodies 
behind. 

I sometimes question the motive 
for going to see "Anne of the 
Thousand Days" or "Hijack" at 
all in favor of seeing good films for 
the second or, if you missed them 
and know they're good, the first 
time. Case in point is the 
organization I represent, the 
Amherst Film Coop. Our schedules 
have always been impeccable 
< You're free to disagree > examples 
of balanced film programs com- 
bine popular film with much 
needed-to-see classics-all en- 
tertaining and painless at the price 
of two and a half draught beers 
(that's 75c for any minors that are 
left). But we suffer with a severe 
case of deficit. Grants from 
sympathetic organizations pen 
ding, we're in trouble. And we 
don't know why. We've tried the 
MM mystique, the nostalgia route, 
the esoteric film, to find an 
audience and it seems lacking. 
But. . we are still searching for 
■those people who decrie the 
mistakes of current commercial 
cinema and seek solitude in the 
past, we are still searching for 
those who appreciate new, and well 
done film but can't find it outside of 



New York City, we are still seeking 
film students who want to see good 
retrospectives and director's and 
star's series on this campus, in this 
area. 

We're not "free" this summer, 
but I might remind those here now 
who will be back in Fall or Spring 
that we have run two semester's 
worth of films charging members 
little over 17c per film. We must 
form a nucleus, and that nucleus 
could form this summer by your 
support, whether you be teacher or 
student or staff. We wish to serve 
you all, please help. 

Our remaining films this sum- 
mer are as follows: Fantastic 
Voyage, Mahar, July 19; Top Hat, 
August 2, Mahar; Forbidden 



Planet, Mahar, August 9. If the list 
seems a bit frivolous remember 
that the Summer is a frivolous 
season. Our Fall program in- 
cludes: the Complete "Greed", 
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 
Renoir's Diary of a Chambermaid, 
A Godard early and Late 
(Masculine/Feminine, Letter to 
Jane) A Capra/Sturges Series, A 
Hepburn/Dietrich Series, Only 
Angels Have Wings, Murmur of the 
Heart, Meet Me In St. Louis, and 
many more including a complete 
retrospective of the feature films 
of Charles Chaplin-a first in New 
England. 

Hoping to see you, 

John D. Morrison 

Program Director 



New Auto Laws From Registrar 



To The Public: 
EFFECTIVE JULY 16, 1973: 

Chapter 188 adds a new section to 
Section 7 of Chapter 90 which 
prohibits any person from altering, 
modifying or changing the height 
ot a motor vehicle by elevating or 
lowering the chasis or body more 
than two inches above or below the 
original manufacturer's specified 
height. 

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 16. 1973: 
chapter 290 increases the 
penalty for abandoning a motor 
vehicle, whether registered or 
unregistered, upon any public or 
private way or on property other 
than his own without the per- 
mission of the owner or leasee of 
the property. Punishment is by fine 
of not less than $100 nor more than 
$500 In addition to revocation for 
conviction, if the motor vehicle is 
registered in his name or was last 
registered in his name, he shall b^ 
prohibited from registering 



another motor vehicle for one year 
and no appeal, motion for new trial 
or exception shall operate to stay 
the revocation of license or 
prohibition of registration. 
EFFECTIVE AUGUST 19, 1973: 
Chapter 301 adds a new section to 
Section 7 of Chapter 90 which 
prohibits the operation by a person 
of a motor vehicle having any tire 
which fails to comply with the 
thread depth regulation pro- 
mulated by the Registrar of Motor 
Vehicles. No owner of a motor 
vehicle knowing that any tire fails 
to comply with such regulation 
shall permit the vehicle to be 
operated. 

EFFECTIVE AUGUST 22, 1973: 
Chapter 314 adds to Section 7B of 
Chapter 90 a clause which prohibits 
smoking or the consuming of 
alcoholic beverages on school 
buses while they are being used to 
transport school children. 



Campus Carousel 

Faculty Failure 

By TONY GRANITE 
FAILURE OF FACULTY evaluations at Indiana U. is costing $10,000 and 
great disappointment, according to the Indiana Daily Student. 

Student evaluations made in Fall 1972 were to have been distributed in 
the Spring. But computer problems have delayed distribution of printouts 
to Fall 1973. And the project will be discontinued. 

"Students rated the faculty members highly. The average rating was 
between excellent and high. That absolutely baffled me, as questions are 
not designed for extremely high ratings," the project director reported. 
"I am not sure why this happened. There may be a much more intimate 
relation between students and faculty." 

TOPLESS DANCERSat a Pi Delta Theta fraternity party at Stanford 
have caused the house to be censured and warned it may lose its housing 
space on campus. 

The Stanford Observer reveals that the PDTs had also been involved in 
egg and rock-throwing incidents with a neighboring fraternity. 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



**** 



NO-PAY LEAVES OF ABSENCE are being volunteered by faculty at 
Mankato (Minn. ) State U. , according to the Daily Reporter there. 

Seems that in the English Dept., enough faculty members have 
volunteered for leaves without pay so that fellow faculty who have lost 
their jobs because of declining enrollment won't have to be dropped from 
the pay roll. 

Six faculty would have received one-year termination notices, this 
Spring. Eighteen faculty are taking leaves of varying periods. 



9 



HEADLINE OF THE WEEK appears in the UNoIowa Northern Iowan, 
capping a piece about v.d. : "It's nothing to clap about." 




Meb Bodensiek, Debbie Hull, and Janet Goode sing an "Andrews 
Sisters" version of "Most Gentlemen Don't Like Love" in the ex- 
citing "Party With Porter" at the TOP OF THE CAMPUS July 18-21 
at 8:00 p.m. Everyone is cordially invited to attend the sophisticated 
fete which will feature dancing, crepes, and an open bar along with 
the top-flight professional entertainment. $1.00 cover charge. 
Presented by the Masque Ensemble and directed by Stephan 
Driscoll. 



Donald S. Call - OPTICIAN 




56 Main St., Amherst • 2537002 




Contact Lens Fluids 




Bausch & Lomb - American Optical 




Sunglasses 




Photo Gray & Photo Sun Lenses 


i 


All The Latest Gold Eye Wires 




• Hey wood Hale Broun • 

© CBS Sportscaster ® 

| Monday July 23 | 


S. 8:00 P.M. 


8. 


X C.C. Auditorium 

Q 

7T FREE-Open to the public 


o 


© 


(D Sponsored by 


w 


O Summer Activities £ 

+ Hey wood Hale Broun • 



'Blithe Spirit" Plays 
At MH Theatre Today 



SOUTH HADLEY, MASS. - The imaginative and 
witty comedy of Noel Coward returns to the tent 
today, with the Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatres production of BLITHE SPIRIT. Charles 
Condomine, a Coward-like writer doing research for 
his next book, invites medium Madame Arcate- to 
hold a seance at his home. The fun and confusion 
begin when the mischievous ghost of his first wife, 
Elvira, materializes--but it's a ticklish situation for 
Charles and his second wife, Ruth, who is very much 
alive! Bonnie Panson, who appeared as Linda 
Christie in PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM, plays the fun- 
loving phantom, and BeeBee Horowitz, who was seen 
last season as Miss Skillon in SEE HOW THEY RUN 
and Dorothy Cleves in ANY WEDNESDAY, is Ruth. 
James Butterfield, a new-comer to the tent, who was 
seen as Centurion in ANDROCLES AND THE LION, 
and who has appeared at The Proposition in Boston, 
plays the harried and haunted Charles. Madame 
Arcate is played by Vicki St. George, who was 

i < 



Megaera in ANDROCLES AND THE LION. 

Directed by Producer-Director Jim Cavanaugh, 
who appeared as Elyot in last year's production of 
PRIVATE LIVES, BLITHE SPIRIT offers a light and 
blithe-spirited evening of fun to Summer Theatre 
audiences. 

BLITHE SPIRIT opens on Tuesday, July 17th and 
will run through Saturday, July 21st. 

Tickets for the show may be purchased from the 
Mount Holyoke College Summer Theatre box office, 
by calling 538-2406. The office is open daily from 10 
A.M. to 9 P.M. except on Sunday. Tickets are $2.50 
and $3.50, and there is a discount of $1.00 for students 
for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evening 
performances. 

Parking is plentiful and gay signs direct the 
audience to the Tent-On-The-Green on the Mount 
Holyoke College campus in South Hadley. Curtain 
time is 8:30 p.m. 



Summer Brave" Opens Tonight 



Stockbridge, Mass. -When actress Ruth Russell left 
New York for play rehearsals of William Inge's 
comedy "Summer Brave," at the Berkshire 
Playhouse in Stockbridge, Mass., she had no idea the 
bus would break down in Yonkers, the driver would 
be cranky, and she would almost step into thin air 
when the steps at her guest home were removed for 
repair during the night! She began to wonder. 

However, Jan Sterling, the star of "Summer 
Brave," saved the day when she found a patch of four 
leaf clovers and gave each cast member one. Add to 
that the good feelings and the very special dream 
actor Ron Libble had about a good play review and 
things began to look better. 

The charms have had their way. Under the 
guidance of producer Lester Persky and the firm but 
sure hand of director Ian Wilder - a young man who 
boasts a varied and experienced theatrical career - 
the show has come to life and will give playhouse 
audiences a real experience in the theatre. The down- 
to-earth gutsy scenes that were the late Inge's forte 
will bring alive the playwright's story of central 
Kansas of the 1950's. 

Featuring Kitty Winn, a winner of the Best Actress 
award at the Cannes Film Festival, and a member of 
the cast of a soon-to-be released five-million dollar 
film, "The Exorcist," and Stephen McHattie, an 
experienced actor on both the stage and in films, the 
cast consists of actors with a wealth of training and 
credits behind them. 

This includes BoBo Lewis who has just completed 
the Broadway production of "The Women," and 
stints on the television shows, "That Girl" and the 
r - ....... .......--^-, 

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I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 
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"Jerry Lewis Show." She will be understudy for Miss 
Sterling as well as play a role. 

Ben Slack has already achieved fame in Stock- 
bridge as the biggest customer at the Stockbridge 
Library annual book sale. He appears as Howard - the 
very reluctant bridegroom. He was winner of the 
Straw Hat award for "Best Supporting Actor" on the 
summer circuit. 

Rod Gibbons and Dolores Kenan both have long 
credit lists on doing TV commercials - their faces will 
be familiar to playgoers - and their stage experience 
is equally solid. 

Mary Cass and Faith Catlin are the final members 
of the regular cast. Ms. Cass has had experience with 
the Cincinatti Shakespeare Festival and has done 
many off-Broadway roles. Ms. Catlin is a graduate of 
the School of Fine Arts in Boston University. She is 
playing in home territory - her parents live in Troy 
N.Y. - a short drive to the Berkshire Playhouse. She is 
a graduate of Emma Willard School in Troy. 

Picking up two minor roles are Bennet Cooperman 
and Gary Cookson. Cooperman is a member of the 
Syracuse summer workshop-in-residence program 
which operates in conjunction with the Berkshire 
Playhouse. He appeared in the workshop's first 
production of the season, "Twelfth Night." 

Gary Cookson is a graduate of New York Univer- 
sity. He has studied at the American Place Theatre. 
Cheering him from the wings will be his famous 
mother, actress Beatrice Straight and father, actor 
Peter Cookson. The Cooksons are permanent sum- 
mer residents in the Stockbridge area. 




Last Chance 

for 

Peanut Gallery 



Buffalo Bob and Howdy Doody will be here 
tomorrow and you have one more chance to sit in 
the Peanut Gallery. Just fill out the form below and 
bring it to 402 Student Union before 4 p.m. today. 



I want to sit in the Peanut Gallery because: 



Name: •••• 
Address : • • 
Telephone: 



Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



An Introduction To UMie Land 



Carlos Garnett - Great Show 




One of the counselors explains to a freshman that he's been here 
for eight semesters, and he still isn't sure how OSCAR works. 




Don (irayson. Counselor in the Summer Orientation Program, 
proves that counselors are always on the ball, as he discusses a 
problem with one of the freshmen. 



Photos and Copy 
by Steve Ruggles 

(Continued from P. 1) 

major. 

In these initial meetings, the new 
students discuss such programs as 
Honors. BDIC, Project 10, 
Colloquia, and other related topics 
such as University, College and 
Major requirements, pass-fail 
option, the registration process, 
add/drop procedures, testing 
guidelines, course exemptions, and 
other issues such as, where to live, 
financial aid, special programs, 
etc. 

After an evening filled with 
requirements, questions, and new 
information, the students are told 
to think about courses and report 
back the next day. Usually the first 
night in the Quad is pretty quiet. 

On the second day of counseling, 
most student ta^e at least one of 
the placemen, tests in foreign 
languages, math, or zoology. On 
the second day, all new students 
attend a college or school meeting, 
and schedule an appointment to 
see a faculty member for private 
advising during the three day 
session. The College of Arts and 
Sciences holds special interest 
meetings and division meetings for 
its students. 

Also on the second day, the en- 
tering student must attend a Living 
Options session. At this session, 
discussion of the five different 
living areas on campus plus the 
Greeks and commuting is initiated. 
Every student must list priorities 
as to his/her choice of living option 
before he/she leaves on the next 
day. Each student is given 
material describing each dor- 
mitory, has a chance to see each 
area on a campus tour, and has the 
opportunity to attend residence 
area information meetins. Before 
each person makes his/her 
preferences known to the housing 
office by way of the housing card, 
the counseling staff attempts to 
make the students' decisions 
educated ones. 

Each incoming freshman and 
transfer student meets with a 




If veteran I Mies think preregistration is confusing, imagine how 
this Freshman woman feels. Two days to pick five courses from 5000. 




On the second evening, some of the Counselors from the staff got 
together and played 50's, jug band, and other types of music to 
packed houses. Pictured here is Vin Mitchel. 



faculty member for between 15 and 
30 minutes. At this consultation, 
the faculty advisor discusses 
courses and helps the student pick 
classes to preregister for. The 
student counselors then help fill out 
the preregistration forms for the 
computer. 

The second evening is always 
much more informal and less 
tense. Barriers have been broken, 
and new friends have been made. 
The staff provides planned ac- 
tivities for the Freshmen, who 
either take advantage of them, or 
plan their own alternative ac- 
tivities. Generally speaking, by 
two o'clock, things have quieted 
down to a dull roar. 

The third day is filled with in- 
formation sessions to help the 
student get the most out of the 
University. Many parents attend 
the session planned for them on the 
third day. They are given 
background information, are given 



campus bus tours, and are 
assigned to discussion groups to 
discuss issues which may be 
causing some concern, and to ask 
questions of the counselor, Head of 
Residence, and administration 
present at each meeting. 

Some Freshmen express the 
desire to come back to the next 
session -glad and willing to pay 
another thirty dollars to meet 
another batch of their classmates. 
Some feel that counseling is a 
waste of their time and money. 
Some act like 14 years olds abusing 
their new-found freedom; others 
find summer counseling an ex- 
cellent opportunity to make 
acquaintances for the fall. 

From some of the counselor's 
viewpoints, this is more than a 
summer job paying a weekly 
salary. To some, meeting a bunch 
of future UMies who are interested 

(Continued on P. 6) 



On July 11 a jazz concert featuring the Dynamic Desatations and Carlos 
Garnett's Universal Black Force took place on Metawampe Lawn. Those 
that attended saw a program and performance that this university has 
lacked since the days of Cage concerts (the one exception being the show 
by Cold Blood last spring). Those that decided to go to the nail or quick- 
bucks must not have known or didn't realize who Carlos Garnett is or 
where he is coming from. Carlos has been musically '.nvo'ved with Art 
Blakey, Freddie Hubbard, and Charlie Mingus. Carlos is on Freddie 
Hubbard's Soul Experiment album on Atlantic label. . . Andrew Hill's Lift 
Every Voice on Blue Note. . .Kenny Gill's What Was, What Is, What Will 
Be on Warner Bros, lable. . . Pharoah Sanders Black Unity on Impulse 
label. . .also on a Miles Davis album for Columbia, Norman Connors for 
Cobblestone, and Robin Kenyatta for Atlantic. 

The Universal Black Force, formed by Carlos around the middle of 1970 
includes: 

Carlos Garnett. . .Tenor, Alto, Soprano Saxophone, Flute & Vocal 

Olu Dara. . .Trumpet, Ebhorn, Vocal 

Steve Lee. . .Drums 

Charles Kahliq Pullian. . .Congas 

Kiyasi. . .Conga Drums 

Onaje . . .Piano, Electric piano 

Alex Blake. . .Bass, Fender Bass, Percussions 

Sister AyoDele. . .Vocal 

Sister Dee Dee Bridgewater. . .Vocal 

Carlos Garnett and Alex Blake are from Panama. Onaje is from Africa. 
The other members are from the United States. Evenually he hopes to 
take the group back to his homeland where he will establish a school for 
young people from the barrios interested in music. 

Carlos plans on cutting a record sometime soon entitled Black Love. A 
song they performed exceptionally through a duration of no power for 
their instruments or PA systems. 

Other songs included Dance of the Virgins, Taurus Woman (Written by 
Carlos), Butterfly Dream (written by Stan Clarke and sung by Dee Dee 
Bridgewater), with an Encore of Mira Flor. 

Hopefully the UBF will return for another concert early next fall. If 
they do don't get caught out of town! 





The Dynamic Desatations came together in North End Community 
Center five years ago. It started with 4 pieces and now has 6 pieces. 
Tony latum on Sax is from Boston. William (Tiger) Clare the 
trumpet player is from Westfield. Andrew Bailey the lead guitarist, 
Joe Sallins on drums and Larry Scott are from Springfield. Rounding 
out the group is Jeff Smith. The combo is scheduled to play at 
Westover officers club and on August 3 they will play for the Queens 
Dance sponsored by Ilarambre at the Chez Josesh. 




»..,* 



Photos and copy by John Neister 





Page *— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Atty. General Answers 
Consumer Questions 



Broun Here Monday 



Consumer questions should be 
sent to Atty. Gen. Robert H. Quinn, 
"Consumer Questions" Room 373, 
State House, Boston, Mass. 02133. 
Those questions with broadest 
interest will be answered in the 
column. * 

Q. Recently I attempted to obtain 
credit for a major purchase- 
however I was refused. Am I en- 
titled to review my credit report? 

A. Yes. Massachusetts law 
provides that consumers who have 
been denied credit have the right to 
review their credit reports upon 
request. The person who refuses 
credit must give the name and 
address of the credit bureau which 
supplied the unfavorable report. 

Q. While going over my credit 
report after having been refused 
credit. I discovered that my 
dossier contained erroneous in- 
formation. What recourse do 



I 



A Masque Ensemble 
Production 

THIS WEEK ONLY! 
"A Party With Porter" 

A Revusical Featuring 
Music of Cole Porter 

Top Of The Campus 
Restaurant 

U. Mass. Campus 

JULY 18-21 

Doors Open At 8:00 PM 
TABLE RESERVATIONS 

CALL 545-2351 
Cover Charge 4.00 



have? 

A. If a consumer learns that he 
has been refused credit due to 
erroneous information, he may ask 
the credit bureau to reinvestigate 
his credit report. If after the 
reinvestigation, the information is 
found to be inaccurate the agency 
must delete the information from 
the files. If the dispute remains 
unresolved, the consumer may file 
a brief statement describing the 
problem. The agency must record 
in any future reports that certain 
information is disputed. After 
deletion the agency must notify 
any person designated by the 
consumer who within two years 
has received a credit report con- 
taining the inaccuracies for em- 
ployment purposes or within six 
months for any other purpose. 

Q. Does everyone have a credit 
rating? 

A. No. Everyone does not have a 
credit rating. A person gets a 
credit rating when he files an 
application for credit and lists the 
people with whom he does 
business. 



<immcoi*ti\ Xomt act\ 
ArriNTioN UH l jmS L 
ImISihc, J I SUPPLIES F 
(tirAi.s ) l*LL KIMOy 




l!». r i North Plrusitnt St., Amherst 



Trl. gSti-MUIl 



(Editor's Note: Mr. Hey wood 
Hale Broun will give a lecture at 
I Mass on Monday, July 23rd, in 
the Campus Center Auditorium at 
8:30 p.m.) 

Legally, there may not be a 
HEYWOOD HALE BROUN, noted 
sportswriter, CBS News com- 
mentator and one-time actor. "My 
father was a famous writer and a 
great sportsman," he says. 
"My grandfather was also a 
great sportsman. I was named 
after him and became Heywood 
Broun HI. A few years of following 
in the footsteps - or being expected 
to - of these men was frustrating, 
so I took it on myself to call myself 
Heywood 'Hale' Broun, the 'Hale' 
being my mother's maiden name." 

HEYWOOD HALE BROUN's 
initiative in changing his name as a 
youth may have set a pattern of the 
unusual, the sometimes forgotten 
and the little publicized events of 
which he makes interesting news. 
BROUN says, "Sports are sports. 
People sometimes think it is silly 
that a youngster's marble tour- 
nament be given news coverage on 
the same basis that the Super Bowl 
might. But consider the pressure 
on an ll-year-old marble player in 
world championship competition. 
The shot he makes with that wet, 
slippery, round piece of glass, over 
some damp clay, may determine 
whether or not he wins a $5000 
scholarship. I think that pressure 
on an 11-year-old is as great as the 
pressure a mature professional 
athlete endures." 

BROUN, a Swarthmore 
graduate - where he was number 
six man on the table tennis team - 
contends that sports do not build 
character. "Sports reveal 
character," he says, "and I enjoy 
writing of sports because, I think, 



madness - the fierce devotion to 
succeed competitively - is essential 
to greatness. I write of people who 
are interesting and not necessarily 
those whom I like personally." 

One of BROUN's favorite 
athletes is Joe Namath, whom he 
calls a "purity in sports. Of 
course," he says, "he is in the news 
as much off-field as on. But he isn't 
pretentious; he has great desire 
and he's the kind of quarterback - 
unlike some - who, when the team 
is losing miserably in the late 
stages of the game, will still try to 
win and not throw those short 
passes that some quarterbacks 
throw with the idea of keeping their 
statistics good taking precedence 
over the team's winning." 

The former sportswriter for the 
New York Star contends that 
sports figures are eigher "comic" or 
"tragic." "Muhammed Ali has 
spontaneous if unpredictable 

(Continued from P. 4) 

in getting the most out of being at 
UMass is just as rewarding as the 
money. In every session, each 
counselor finds freshmen who are 
interesting, intelligent, and ex- 
citing to talk to. It's encouraging to 
see these kids coming to UMie 
land. 

In September, the University of 
Massachusetts will have 3500 new 
freshmen and 1500 transfer 
students. They've all been through 
Summer Counseling. They'll all be 
here. . .we've seen them all!! 



humor; Pete Reiser, (ormer 
Dodgers centerfielder, was one of 
those do-or-die athletes. He cut his 
career short by running into 
stadium walls chasing fly balls. 
Mickey Mantle played ball 
swathed in bandages and great 
pain. 

BROUN, whose favorite sport is 
horse racing, never excelled 
athletically as a youngster. At 135 
pounds, his biggest sports triumph 
was winning $112 on a Kentucky 
Derby wager. 

HEYWOOD HALE BROUN 
recently purchased a castle in 
southern Ireland to convert to a 
hotel. He is busy travelling the US 
covering sports spectacles, run- 
ning two recording companies, 
doing CBS news and sports 
coverage (including the 1972 
Olympics and the terrorist 
slaughter in Munich) and lecturing 
on college campuses. 



Infirmary 


Urn Am 


■awrgency) 


(54] S-2B71 



AIR COND. 



NOW! 



The Preservation Hal 
Jazz Band Is Coming! 



AMHERSTC^ta 

AMITY ST. . AMHERST 



SodiaGoraeoosKd 



253-5426 



ight! 

—JUDITH CHIST, N»» York Magai me 
CCX.UMBIA PICTURES presents 

. FRANCOIS TRUFFAULm. -- 

« It! Films OoOrojst ColvnOt fi'm S » co-pcoducli<Mi * DlRNADETTE LAFONT 



(Subtitles) 



SHOWN EVES. AT 7:00 & 9:00 SAT. & SUN. MAT. 2:00 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES ALL SEATS SI .00 



Anne of the Thousand Days 

Tuesday ' July. 17 8:00 P.M. 

Campus Center Auditorium 

free/summer students with I.D. seated first 

Sponsored by the Summer Activities Committee 



AIR COND . 

[DOUBLE 
FEATURE 
AT 9:00 



CALVIN THEATRE 

KING ST., NORTHAMPTON 



sumi* 



[PGl METROCaOR •«"© 
IJAMES CAAN & SALLY KELLERMANpg 



584-2310 
| ROD 

Itaylor, 
anne heywood 



ALSO MATINEES SAT. & SUN. COMPLETE SHOW 1:30 I. 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS SI 00 



«* 



*m 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show you all the reasons in the world why BRANDYWINE is a 
better place to live. We invite you to compare features and com- 
pare prices. The few minutes you spend with our two beautiful 
models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year 





Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently "liveable": 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat 
and cooking included in rent. 

Kxtra security features. 

Large, partially enclosed private patios 
and balconies 
Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company, Hartford, 
Connecticut 

One bedroom units from $200 
Two bedroom units from $235 




Brandy wine at Amherst 



mmm 



«■ 



m 



50 Meadow St. 
Amherst 

549-0600 



Harrington Warns 
Of NE Fuel Shortage 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



UM Gets $54, 000 
Grant From NSF 



Warning that New England will 
face the most severe heating oil 
shortage in its history this winter, 
TJ.S. Rep. Michael J. Harrington 
(D-Mass.) told the House In- 
terstate and Foreign Commerce 
Committee yesterday that "little, 
i anything, is being done by either 
the oil companies or the govern- 
ment to deal with this impending 
crisis." 

Harrington based his forecast to 
the Committee on the results of a 
questionnaire he sent to the nine 
largest oil companies supplying 
Massachusetts with petroleum 
products. The companies indicated 
that they would be unable to supply 
any more fuel oil to New England 
than they did last year, during the 
most* severe shortage in history. 

Five of the companies surveyed- 
Exxon, Texaco, Shell, American 
and Sunoco-indicated that heating 
oil demand would increase from 3 
to 9 percent over last winter, with 
no increase in supply anticipated. 
Noting that last winter was the 
mildest one in parts of New 
England in almost 14 years, 
Harrington argued that the 
statistics point to major heating oil 
shortages this winter. 

"To put it bluntly^ Harrington 

Notices 

Dr. Peter Wolff, M.D., of 
Medical Aid to Indochina, will 
speak on "Human Problems in 
North and South Vietnam," under 
the sponsorship of students of the 
Smith School of Social Work. He 
will appear on Thursday, July 19th, 
7:30 p.m., at McConnell Hall, 
Room 103, on the Smith College 
Campus in Northampton. 

Father Rubert Manning, 
Chaplain of the Holy Cross, who 
has just recently returned from 
Vietnam will also be on the 
program. 



Amherst Film Coop showing of 
Fantastic Voyage has been 
rescheduled from July 18th to July 

19th in Mahar Auditorium. 

♦ • * 

Christian Science College 
Organization warmly invites you to 
its weekly meeting at 6:45 p.m. 
every Tuesday. Come and hear the 
Truth that heals. See Campus 

Center Calendar for room number. 

* * * 

Tuesday, July 17, Hike in 
Holyoke Range - Leaves from Bus. 
Circle in front of Stockbridge Hall 
at 5:30 p.m. 

Thursday, July 19, Introductory 
Rockclimbing at Chapel Lodge 
Leaves from Bus Circle in front of 
Stockbridge Hall at 5:30 p.m. 



Classifieds 



FOR SALE 

Pioneer SX 770 Stereo receiver and pair of 
LKH model seventeen speakers $275 or 
best offer Call Mark 545 2093 days. 

t7/19 



MELPWANTED 

Wanted Mature reliable clean cut person 
for assistant managers position, five n.ghts 
per wk. Apply in person to Mr. Aldrich, 

Amherst Cinema. 

7/17 

FOR SALE 

1967 Mustang, V8, A T , Air cond., PS., 
57,000 miles, excellent cond 568 7521. 

17/19 



MONEY 
Earn %7. 00 for participating in a Psychology 
Experiment Requires 1 hour, no noxious 
stimuli Call Shirley at 545 0071 for Apt. 

T7/19 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

Room available immediately: own 
bedroom in 5 room apt. with large kitchen. 
Walk to school. Only $75/mo., all otll. Call 
549 6013 morn. 

tf 7/19 

DRIVER WANTED 

To Miami area at the end of July. Call 549 
1532 or 1 783 2456. 

tf 7/24 



said, "the country may be facing 
the most severe winter threat to 
public health and safety in its 
history unless we tell the oil 
companies to begin maximizing 
the production of heating oil, even 
if it is at the expense of gasoline. 
Plans must be made to import 
large amounts of heating oil for use 
by consumers. And the Govern- 
ment must begin to draft plans for 
allocating fuels this winter." 

"Despite the warnings from the 
New England Congressional 
delegation last year," he asserted, 
"the heating oil shortage caught 
the Nixon Administration by 
surprise. Consumers saw oil 
reserves run low and prices 
skyrocket while the Ad- 
ministration's response was 'too 
little, too late.' We cannot afford to 
take the same wait and see attitude 
this year." 

Harrington's testimony also 
dealt with the gasoline shortage 
and its effect on independent 
dealers. He charged the shortage 
"was contrived to force the in- 



dependent marketers out of 
business, while vastly improving 
the profit picture and industry 
domination of the largest oil 
companies," a view which was 
substantiated by a recent report of 
the Federal Trade Commission. 

The Beverly Democrat ad- 
vocated legislation he had in- 
troduced to guarantee gasoline 
supplies to cities, towns, and in- 
dependent dealers. Under the 
measure, major oil companies 
would be required to make at least 
10 percent of their gas supply 
available to non-affiliated 
customers who are currently 
locked out of a large portion of the 
gasoline market. 

"The present energy shortage," 
Harrington concluded, "has oc- 
curred because an industry has 
grown too large and too powerful. 
In many ways, the industry is more 
powerful than the government. 
This situation must be reversed if 
the people of this country are to be 
assured the energy they need at 
reasonable prices" 



WASHINGTON, D.C., - U.S. 
Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R-Mass., and 
Sen. Edward W. Brooke today 
announced that the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst has 
been awarded a $54,000 grant from 
the National Science Foundation. 

The grant will support a 13- 



month study into the "Feasibility 
of Designing a Model for Resource 
Aggregation Among Small 
Manufacturers in Fragmented 
Industries." 

Principal investigator will be Dr. 
Howard Segool of the School of 
Engineering. 





AMHERST'S tm DEPARTMENT SJ^Ejf 



Short and Long SUMMER DRESSES 

from *5.95 

[r/MElfr TO THE POSf OFFICE an n. pleasantW)) 



ACROSS 

1 Aroma 
5 Blemish 
9 Insane 

12 Unaspi rated 

13 Seize 

14 Poem 

15 Delirium tre- 

mens (abbr.) 

16 Slender 

18 Parent (colloq.) 

20 Latin conjunc- 
tion 

22 Mountains of 
Europe 

24 Succor 

27 Jog 

29 Abound 

3 1 Title ot respect 

32 Entertain 
34 Actual 

36 Note of scale 

37 Optical 

phenomenon 
39 Talks idly 

41 Indefinite arti- 

cle 

42 Be borne 

44 Atmospheric 

disturbance 

45 Conducted 
47 Threshold 

49 Periods ot time 

50 Paradise 

52 Caudal appen- 
dage 

54 Symbol for 
niton 

55 Bow 

57 Instrument 
59 Chaldean city 
61 Existed 

63 Solar disk 

64 Ireland 

67 French for 

"summer" 

68 Unmarried 

woman 

69 Woody plant 



DOWN 

1 Ancient 

2 Decided 

3 Preposition 

4 Things, in law 

5 Long-legged 

bird 

6 Indulge to ex- 

cess 

7 Stamp of ap- 

proval 

8 Spread fro dry- 

ing 

9 Fashions 

10 Paid notice 

1 1 Prefix: down 
17 Note of scale 
19 Exclamation 
21 Journey 

23 Leak through 

25 Reading 

material 

26 Geometric 

solids 





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28 Former Russian 

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30 Planet 
33 Shield 
35 Tardy 
38 Prepare for 

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40 Ripped 
43 Puffs up 
46 Thick 



48 King of beasts 

(pi) 
51 Negative 
53 Behold! 
56 Obstruct 
58 Permit 

60 Female ruff 

61 Pronoun 

62 Near 

64 Note of scale 
66 Negative prefix 



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Distr. by United Feature Syndicate, Inc. 





by parker and hart 




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^*»*A*< 



Page •— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



IM Cross Country Meet Tomorrow 









•-w 


IP 

\ 4 

m 






hi 

V ft 




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I 1. 



Patriots 
Quiz Answers 

Here are the answers for the 
Patriots Trivia Quiz that was run 
in the Tuesday edition of the Crier. 

1) Ron Burton of Northwestern 
University. 

2) Harvey White of Clemson. A 
quarterback. 

3) Lou Saban. 

4) 1960 — 350 reported for camp. 

5) Boston University Field and 
then Fenway Park. 

6) 52 points were scored in a 52-21 
victory over the Buffalo Bills at 
B.U. Field. 

7) The three numbers are: 20- 
Gino Cappelletti ; 79- Jim Hunt; 89- 
Bob Dee. 

8) Bob Reynolds, a tackle from 
Bowling Green. 

9) Nick Buoniconte. 

10) Jim Whalen, a tight end, in 
1968. 



Women's Cross Country 



Sports Shorts 



CARLISLE, Pa. - Running back 
Larry Brown, the National 
Football League's Most Valuable 
Player last season, has failed to 
show up at the Washington Red- 
skins' training camp because of 
"important personal matters." 

ANAHEIM - Nolan Ryan of the 
California Angels, one of only five 
pitchers in major league history to 
hurl two no-hitters in one season, 
says he would like to pitch a record 
third no-hitter, but would rather 
improve on his 11-11 record. 




MT. TOBY 
RIDING STABLES 

RT. 63, LEVERETT 

8 MILES FROM CAMPUS 

Guided Trail Rides 

and 

Lessons 7 Days 
a Week 

9:00 AM - 9:00 PM 

m 549-1677 
0R 549-6945 



IM Standings 



Men's Softball 
American League 

1. Bio Psych 2-0 

2. Civil 2-0 

3. NAPC 1-0-1 

4. Swine l-o-l 

5. Pipefitters l-i 

6. Batmen l-i 

7. Big Sticks 1-1 

8. Misfits M 

9. Watergate 0-2 
10. Profs 0-2 

Co-Rec Softball 

1. Immorril 2-0 

2. Upward Bound 1-1 

3. Misfits 1-1 

4. Swine 0-2 

Co-Rec Volleyball 

1. Bound Upward 1-0 

2. No Team 1-0 

3. Upward Bound 0-1 

4. CCEBS 0-1 



National League 

l.P.S.E. 
2. Plumbers 



2-0 
1-1 
1-1 
1-1 
1-1 
0-2 
0-2 
0-2 



3. Education 

4. Dishrags 

5. Immorril 

6. Ashcan 

7. Shamrocks 

8. CCEBS 

9. Sissies 
10. Ringers 

Men's Volleyball 

1. Big Sticks 

2. CCEBS 

3. Galahad 

4. P.S.E. 



Creation 

Antiques 

Inventory sale, 
Antique clothes 
drastically reduced\ 
jewelry, too. 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy * trade, too. 



One of the single-event highlights of this summer's intramural ac- 
tivities will be held this Wednesday evening at 7:00 PM as aspiring long 
distance runners compete in cross country races. There will be two races, 
one for men and one for women, that will be run on the road that 
surrounds Alumni Stadium. 

Entries for this race can be submitted to the intramural office up to the 
time of the race. The women's event will be one mile and the men's race 
will be 1.7 miles (once around the road) with trophies being presented to 
the winners in each division. But even if your goals are not to be the next 
Frank Shorter or Francie LaRue come on down to the Stadium and have a 
good workout. 



»•«» 



The intramural office reminds all those persons who are playing in 
individual sports tournaments (tennis, badminton, handball, paddleball, 
squash) to pick up their schedules at the office. If you have any problems 
contacting your opponents or arranging matches notify the IM Office 
between 8 AM and 9 PM Monday -Friday, or call 545-2801 or 545-2693. 
Forfeits should be avoided so that these round robins may be held suc- 
cessfully. 

Track Meets Show 
Very Close Races 



The weekly track meets spon- 
sored by the UMass women's track 
club produced some very close 
races in both men's and women's 
races. Six individual and 2 relay 
records were broken. Mark Lech of 
Thorndike broke Bernie Webley's 
week old record of 53.4 in the 
quarter mile with a 51.1 clocking. 
Webly finished second also under 
the old record. 

In these Thursday evening meets 
beginning at 5:00 for adults and 
4:00 for children Marianne Wilcox 
of UMass won the women's mile by 
.6 of a second over Merry Cushing 



Amherst, 5:56.4 to 5:57. 

John Pogoda of Turners Falls 
won the mile by a mere .3 of a 
second and Paul Oparowski broke 
the two mile record by 4 seconds to 
win in 10:03. 

Louise Halle of Amherst set a 
new record in the Javlin throw for 
women with a toss of 155'4" while 
Kathy Kelly running for the 
Sugarloaf Mt. A.C. set a women's 
440 record of 60 seconds flat. The 
meet is open to all men and 
women. Races are held in sections 
according to ability. 




President Kichizo Niwa of the University of Hokkaido in Japan looks over pictures presented to him at 
a reception this week at UMass. Looking on are Chancellor and Mrs. Randolph W. Bromery. UMass and 
the University of Hokkaido have been affiliated since 1871 when UMass President William S. Clark went 
to Sapporo, Japan to establish an agricultural college which became the University of Hokkaido. 





Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

M OH. -SAT. 10:00-8:00 T**\~~U~ e*w «-«, 

thurs. & FRl. Til 9:00 Telephone 586-3727 




SALE 




USED JEANS 2 for*? 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 



WORK SHIRTS 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 

USED VESTS 



2 for *2 
2 for *6 

2 for *3 



Amherst's Tire Store- 



i m iiTn 



Firestone Shell Jetzon 

Veith Pirelli 



MICHELIN X 

Le Havre Rodial Tires 



Steel Belted 




1 




ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS , 7~- «*<•<"* 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 

FOR $C A 

ONLY JeU 




University of Massachusetts 



July 19, 1973 



Volume 2, Issue 8 







Professional American * 
Foreign Car Repair 




! 

: 
S 



t 

i 



B PLAZA SHELL & 



t m wim 

T.W.KJ 



Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPIM 24 HOURS 



m 



?ew>*f 




this week at the . . . 

Minuteman Mercantile 

campus center 

THE RECORD SALE CONTINUES!! 
V? PRICE ON TOMATO PLANTERS!! 
HEALTH & BEAUTY AID ITEMS ON SALE!! 
CALCULATORS e A NEW TYPEWRITER 
SMOKING NEEDS - ALL KINDS! SPECIALS 

8:30 - 4:30 M-F 




Crier Photo/John Neister 

A toast to Cole Porter at the Top-of the-Campus by the Masque Ensemble presents "A Party with 
Porter" this Wednesday through Saturday nights at 8 :00 p.m. 

The revusical will feature songs from seventeen of Cole Porter's shows as well as lesser known songs 
from his personal collection. The show will be presented in a cafe theatre style, recreating a 1930's 
nightclub atmosphere with costumed chef, hostess, and cigarette girl as well as a camera girl that will 
take your picture and send you a copy for a small fee! A chef with a traveling cart will prepare and serve 
crepes for the guests before the performance. A wide variety of drinks will be available from the bar. 

The cast for "A Party with Porter" includes Debbie Hull, Marty Kitrosser, Bill Norris, Janet Goode, 
and Meb Podensiek. Director and final member of the cast is Stephen Driscoll. Music will be provided by 
Douglas Cox on piano and David Thompson on the drums. 



UMass, Hokkaido 
Strengthen Ties 



Closer ties between the 
University of Hokkaido in Japan 
and UMass are being explored this 
week as President Kichizo Niwa of 
Hokkaido visits UMass. 

Hokkaido and UMass have been 
offiliated since 1871 when 
President William S. Clark of 
UMass went to Sapporo, Japan to 
establish an agricultural college. 
Sapporo Agricultural College 
became the University of 
Hokkaido. 

President Niwa is meeting with 
UMass-Amherst Chancellor 
Randolph W. Bromery and Vice 
Chancellor Robert W. Gage in 
Amherst, and with UMass 
President Robert Wood in Boston. 

During his three-day stay in 
Amherst, the Hokkaido President 
was scheduled to tour the area, 
including the gavesite of President 
Clark, who was the third UMass 
President. His schedule also in- 
cluded visits with UMass engineers 
and environmentalists. 

At a reception on the Amherst 
campus Sunday night he was 
presented with memorabilia of 



President Clark, including a filmed 
record of a graveside ceremony 
honoring Dr. Clark last May. The 
ceremony was for the planting of a 
Japanese cherry tree descended 
from one brought from Japan in 
1880 by one of Dr. Clark's 
colleagues, Prof. William Penn 
Brown. 

Dr. Clark established the 
agricultural college in Sapporo at 
the invitation of the Emperor of 
Japan, and in the following years 
several members of Clark's 
faculty served at Sapporo. Prof. 
William Wheeler, one of these 
faculty members, became 
president of the Japanese 
agricultural college. From 1948 to 
1962, UMass, under a contract 
from the U.S. State Department, 
helped strengthen the Hokkaido 
agricultural curricula. Eleven 
faculty members from the UMass 
College of Agriculture went to 
Hokkaido, and 52 Japanese 
professors and students received 
advanced training at the Amherst 
campus. 



\ 




Preservation Hall 
Here Next Week 



One of the most exciting concerts of the season is set for Thur- 
sday, July 26 at 7 p.m. on Haigis Mall in front of the Whitmore 
Administration Building at the University of Massachusetts. The 
Preservation Hall Jazz Band of New Orleans, Louisiana will be 
here for a history making appearance. The band is made up of the 
people who actually created the music. The men who were there 
when marches and quadrilles and blues and spirituals and ragtime 
all were merged into "jass". 

The youngster in the Preservation Hall Jazz Band was born in 
1910. But even though all of the members of the band are over 60 
now, there is no lapse in the playing, no lessening of the spirit and 
the joy and the simple happiness that is so much a part of the glory 
of New Orleans jazz. 

Preservation Hall in New Orleans was originally a place where 
these original musicians could get together and play for mostly 
their own pleasure. Now it is a place where people from all over the 
world pack the benches each night to hear the music as it was 
played when it was created, and bands are traveling all over the 
world to bring this music to audiences everywhere. It truly 
preserves New Orleans Jazz, and makes possible the history 
making tours that will include a stop here. 

Young Americans are finding a new joy in this unique music, 
older Americans are remembering the joys of their salad years. 
Together these generations are providing the packed auditoriums 
that make these tours by the history makers more successful each 
year. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band will perform on July 26 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. on Haigis Mall in front of the Whitmore Ad- 
ministration Building at the University of Massachusetts in 
Amherst. 




X 




Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



M - ~| The ■■ 

Crier 



The Cri«r is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff Is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Michael Ugolini 



The Senility System 






Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G.Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

John Neister 




Since Sam has become such a 
celebrity around campus, he's 
taken to traveling incognito. Bet 
you never would have recognized 
him. 



Item: Of the 27 chairmen of the standing com- 
mittees in the House of Representatives, only six 
come from urban centers of more than 100,000 
population, and one of these six-George Mahon of 
Lubbock, Texas, chairman of the House Ap- 
propriations Committee-grew up on a farm. Four of 
the chairman come from towns so small that they are 
not listed in the World Almanac, which lists any 
center of more than 2500. 

These men have as little interest in familiarizing 
themselves with the needs of the central city as urban 
congressmen have in learning how to milk a goat. 

Item: The three most powerful men in the House 
(aside from Speaker Carl Albert, who comes from 
Bug Tussle, Oklahoma) are William Colmer, 
chairman of the Rules Committee, whose home is 
Pascagoula, Mississippi, population 27,000; Wilbur 
Mills, chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, 
who comes from Kensett, Arkansas, a place of less 
than 100 population; and Mahon of Lubbock, Texas, 
which is not so much a city as it is a general store. 

Yet these men, who represent the most stagnant 
backwaters of America, are empowered to answer 
these three most basic questions: Which bills are 
going to be permitted to come to a vote? Who and 
what Congress is going to tax, and who and what will 
be allowed to escape taxation? How and where and 
when is the money going to be spent? 

Item: Of the 28 chairmen in the House, 8 of them 
are over 70 and the average age is 68. The seniority 
system (or more appropriately the senility system) is 
one reason why Congress does nothing. But a real eye 
opener is to see what goes on behind closed doors, for 
example, in a typical House-Senate Conference 
Committee. 

In December of 1969, the committee met to dispose 
of the so-called Tax Reform Act of that year. The 
committee agreed to increase the tax exemption for 
the wage-earner by $150 a year, but at the same time 
agreed to create other special deductions that would 



give deductions to high income earners of up to 
$90,000 a year. 

This provision had been slipped into the House s tax 
legislation at a midnight session of the House Ways 
and Means Committee just before the bill was ap- 
proved and reported to the full House. It represented 
an extra $200 million loss to the government, or gain 
to the highly paid and the ordinary taxpayer would 
have to make up the deficit. 

The conference bill was then approved by both 
Houses, which received it just three days before the 
Christmas vacation and didn't want to get into an 
argument that would interfere with the holidays. And 
so the nation was strapped with a costly piece of 
special interest legislation that was not debated in the 
full committee of either House or debated on the floor 
ofeither House and the general public never reaUy 
became aware of it. And, no record of a conference 
committee's deliberations or votes is ever made 

public. , . . 

Those who have benefited most from the seniority 
system have been those politicians who come from 
safe districts or safe states; where the establishment 
sees to it that so long as they follow tradition and 
protect the status quo, no serious challengers will 
arise to endanger their place in Congress. And, since 
the safest no-contest areas are in the South, that area 
has benefited most in Congress. Southerners chair 
the most important committees in both Houses. 

All Southern chairmen are nominally, at least, 
Democrats. But only a couple of them cast their votes 
more than 50 per cent of the time with the national 
Democratic party platform, and some cast their 
votes as much as 80 per cent of the time with the 
conservative Republican opposition. 

The solution: Get rid of these redneck jerks and 
replace them with progressive leaders who can get 
things done. Until this step is taken, Congress will 
remain a swamp and a powerless token of democracy . 

Michael Ugolini is a Crier columnist. 



r ******^********^|********** UMass News Roundup 



* 

* 
* 
* 



Crier Quiz 




Here's today's Mystery Man, a well known per- 
sonality in America. The hint is that he's associated 
with the city of New York. Don't forget, first person 
to come to Room 402 Student Union and tell us who 
he is gets his/her picture in Tuesday's Crier. Hurry! 




Here's Tuesday's contest win- 
ner, Ross Romine of 12 Sumner St.. 
Florence, a Grad Student. He 
guessed Tuesday's Mystery Man 
as Archibald Cox, the Watergate 
prosecutor, saying "I'm an ardent 
fan of Archibald's". He even saw 
through Archibald's clever 
Oakland A's disguise, which he 
uses to avoid publicity. 



* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



Amherst, Mass. - Dr. Mortimer Appley, dean of the 
UMass Graduate School, has been elected to a two- 
year term on the Executive Board of the New 
England Conference on Graduate Education. The 
conference is made up of representatives of both 
public and private graduate schools of New England 
universities and colleges. 

In a separate set of meetings, Dean Appley was 
also elected chairman of the newly-formed Council of 
Graduate Schools of the New England Land Grant 
Universities, a group organized at the behest of the 
New England State University presidents for 
cooperation and collaboration among member in- 
stitutions in graduate and research programs. 

He currently serves as a member of the Graduate 
Advisory Committee of the Massachusetts Board of 
Higher Education and is the University's graduate 
liaison representative to the New England Board of 
Higher Education. 



in Plants." The model consists of a set of quasikinetic 
nonlinear differential equations which describe the 
carbohydrate budget of living plants. The model is 
temperature and light sensitive and can be used to 
predict total weight accumulation as well as car- 
bohydrate synthesis in plants. 

Amrng the science and engineering faculty 
members participating in research this summer at 
laboratories of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission 
is Prcfessor Kandula Sastry of the UMass physics 
and astronomy department. He is working at AEC's 
University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge, Tenn. 



• • * 



* * • 



Drs. C. S. Chen and J. T. Clayton of the UMass food 
and agricultural engineering department and Dr. G. 
E. Meyer, a research scientist with the U.S. Air 
Force, have been invited to present a paper at the 
10th International Conference on Medical and 
Biological Engineering at Dresden, East Germany, 
August 13-17. 

Their paper, based on work sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, is 
"Mathematical Modeling of Carbohydrate Synthesis 



Donald M. Koslow, executive officer for the UMass 
Library information systems, has been named a 
Council on Library Resources Fellow for 1973-74. One 
of 31 selected nationally by the council, he will do a 
study on the effect that the development of computer- 
based centralized processing is having on academic 
library networks. 



* ♦ • 



The American Council of Learned Societies Joint 
Committee on Eastern Europe has awarded post- 
doctoral grants to two UMass scholars. The awards 
support research in the humanities and social 
sciences in eight Eastern European countries. At 
UMass, John Cole, assistant professor of an- 
thropology, and David A. Kideckel, graduate student 
in anthropology, received the grants to study the 
Romanian language. 



Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editorThe only re ^7™f * ^ 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be include* 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 




Gospel Singer Rhonda Anderson is originally from Springfield, Illinois. Ms. Anderson began singing in 
her father's church when she was seven. She began her study of music with Carl Walker in St. Paul 
Minnesota when she was 12. 

Ms. Anderson, a student here at the University of Massachusetts is a psychology major. She plans to 
go to graduate school. Last April she performed In "The Day In the Pride- and Elegance of the Black 
Woman" which was presented in the Campus Center Auditorium last April 25th. 



Masque Offers 
Workshops Here 

The Masque Ensemble is back this month at UMass with a summer of 
participatory theater open to UMass summer r hool students and the 
community. 

This is Masque's third season of major productions and workshops in 
various aspects of the theater, and seminars on design and construction. 
Masque is supported by the UMass Summer Program Council. 

John Van Druten's "Bell, Book, and Candle," a romance of witches and 
warlocks, will be presented July 27-29 and Aug. 2-4 in Bowker Auditorium, 
beginning at 8 each night. Bonnie Bishoff is director. 

Tickets are 50 cents for UMass students with identification and $2 for 
others. Ticket information may be obtained at the Bowker box office in 
Stockbridge Hall (545-2149) and the Masque office, 328 Student Union 
(545-2271). 

Masque will also offer several theater workshops. 

Michelle Faith will direct and instruct a Story Theatre Workshop; the 
imaginative presentation of a story in which actors become characters, 
animals, machines, etc. The workshop will include exercises in im- 
provisation and creative use of body and voice for the original script, "In 
the Good Old Summertime," which takes a nostalgic look at small town 
life in America. Performances will also make use of other "hidden 
talents" such as playing folk and homemade instruments, singing folk 
songs, square dancing, preaching, parading. 

Floyd Bailey will head up the Masque's Children's Theatre Workshop, 
created improvisationally by adults. The first two weeks will be spent 
introducing improvisational techniques and acting exercises. The 
remaining time will be devoted to preparation for performance: adap- 
tations of "The Giving Tree" by Shel Silverstein and "The Oak That 
Would Not Pay" by Maria Elena de la Iglesia. The Company will tour the 
Amherst area and environs with these children's productions. Both 
performance workshops will be free of charge to student and community 
audiences. 

A Movement Workshop, led by Stephen Driscoll, will include instruction 
in the discipline and techniques of yoga, modern jazz and ballet, dance 
improvisation, breathing exercises, and mime. The group will work in a 
variety of spaces, indoors and out. 

A seminar in the design and construction of costume, directed by Ruth 
Seligman, will include discussion of the design process and basic 
techniques of sewing. Participants will have the opportunity to aid in 
construction of costumes for the Masque productions and workshop 
production design. 

A Set Construction Workshop, under the instruction of Ray Nichols, will 
be a practical course in the basics of set construction including the use of 
tools and materials. Participants will have the opportunity to aid in the 
construction and technical aspects of the main stage Masque produc- 
tions, as well as workshop productions. 

The Masque will also offer a workshop in Video Tape and Film under 
the direction of Coley Blodgett (Prerequisite: Speech 223, Program 
Process in Television, or equivalent), reviewing film and video tape 
techniques. The seminar will premiere films on American Indian Art and 
the poetry of Robert Frost. 

Those interested in joining one or more of the Masque Workshops are 
asked to contact the Activities Office, 328 Student Union, UMass, 545-2271. 



ROTC For Vets 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Peat 3 



Superbowl Of Music Saturday 



The second annual Superbowl of Music in- 
ternational championship drum and bugle corps 
competition will be dedicated to the late State Senator 
Philip Andrew Quinn of Spencer, for his many years 
of service to humanity and especially for his work on 
the Special Legislative Commission on Belchertown 
State School and Monson State Hospital. 

The Senator Philip A. Quinn Memorial Trophy will 
be presented to the first place drum and bugle corps 
at the Superbowl Saturday, Aug. 18, at Alumni 
Stadium. Proceeds from the competition will be used 
to benefit residents of Belchertown State School. 

Groups which will compete are: Les Diploma tes 
from Quebec City, Canada; The Skyliners from New 
York City and defending champions of the first an- 
nual Superbowl of Music; The Caballeros, national 
champions from Hawthorne, New Jersey; The 
Hurricanes from Shelton, Connecticut; The Sunrisers 
from Long Island; and The Matadors from 
Providence, Rhode Island. Also featured in special 
exhibition will be The St. George Olympians from 
Springfield, and The Princemen-Renegades from 
Boston. Two local Junior Corps which are involved in 
the event are the Millers Falls Drum Corps, which 
will open the ceremonies with the color guard of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post of Amherst, and the 
St. George Olympians which will be host corps. 

Sen. Philip Quinn who died August 29, 1972 was born 
Feb. 21, 1910, in Worcester. He served with the Army 



Air Corps in World War II. He was a member of the 
Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1949 to 

1964 and a member of the Massachusetts Senate from 

1965 to 1972. He was active in the American Legion, 
V.F.W., Massachusetts Hotel Association, Exchange 
Club, Spencer Agriculture Association, Knights of 
Columbus, Hamilton Rod & Gun Club, Southbridge 
Elks, and the Massachusetts Legislators Association. 
Senator Quinn was the first Chairman of the Special 
Legislative Commission on Belchertown State School 
and Monson State Hospital to investigate conditions 
at these institutions. 

The program will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the 20,000- 
seat University of Massachusetts Alumni Stadium. 
Honorary chairmen of the Superbowl committee are 
Bishop Christopher J. Weldon of Springfield and 
Judge Samuel Blassberg of Greenfield. Co-chairmen 
are Dr. Benjamin Ricci, president of the Belchertown 
State School Friends Association and Dr. William 
Venman, UMass Director of Continuing Education. 

The Belchertown State School Friends Association, 
a group dedicated to the improvement of the quality 
of the lives of the mentally retarded residents at 
Belchertown, will apply the proceeds after expenses 
to help humanize the environment of the residents at 
Belchertown. Advance reservations may be made 
with George Como, 229 Whitmore UMass, Amherst, 
Mass. 01002. In case of rain Aug. 18, the program will 
be the following day, Sunday, at 1:30 p.m. 



SITI Underway Here 



A five-week Summer Institute on Teaching Im- 
provement is underway at UMass where 15 faculty 
members are working toward better teaching 
abilities. 

Each faculty member is teaching one course which 
undergoes evaluation, and also attends talks and 
workshops which feature a variety of speakers from 
on and off the campus. 

Present in the classrooms as the faculty members 
teach their courses are diagnosticians, doctoral 
candidates who interview each of the 15 faculty 
members and their students. Classes are also video- 
taped so the faculty members may view their 
teaching performances. 

The Summer Institute on Teaching Improvement is 
the first campus-wide project of the Clinic To Im- 
prove University Teaching, which is funded by a 
three-year grant of $590,000 from the W- K. Kellogg 
Foundation of Battle Creek, Michigan. The 15 faculty 
members participating come from different 
academic departments throughout the UMass 
campus. 



Remaining sessions, open to the public, are: 

Tuesday, July 17, "Humanistic Education as an Aid 
to Positive Learning" David Aspy, Bishop College, 
Dallas. Wednesday, July 18, "Individualizing 
Learning: The Keller Plan," Klaus Schultz, UMass 
School of Education. Thursday, "Skills of Learning," 
David Aspy. 

Tuesday, July 24, "The Teaching Appraisal In- 
strument: An Alternative View of Teaching," 
Madeline Hunter, UCLA. Wednesday, July 25, 
"Sociology of the Student at the University," Paul 
Adams, UMass Clinic to Improve University 
Teaching. Thursday, July 26, "Teaching Styles," 
Moshe Giladi, University of Haifa, Kiryat, Tivon, 
Israel. 

Tuesday, July 31, "An Introduction to Micro- 
teaching," Robert Miltz, UMass School of Education. 
Wednesday, Aug. 1, "Alternatives for Departmental 
Teaching Improvement Programs," Michael Melnik, 
director of the UMass Clinic to Improve University 
Teaching. 

All sessions are in Herter Hall, Room 231. 



"Stealability 



if 



Veterans who will be juniors next 
year at UMass are being offered a 
special opportunity by the ROTC 
department of air science. 

By special waiver, these vets will 
be allowed entry into the two-year 
Air Force commissioning program 
without attending a four-week field 
training exercise this summer. 
This allows the vets an additional 
three months beyond the normal 
cut-off date to qualify for entry into 
the program. 

Completion of the two-year 
program results in a commission 
as a second lieutenant in the Air 
Force with substantial benefits 
derived from the veteran's prior 
service. 

Any vets wishing further in- 
formation on commissioning 



programs offered by the depart- 
ment of air science are encouraged 
to call or visit a member of the 
faculty at Dickinson Hall, 
University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst. 

Ch. 5 To Show 
Conference 

WCVB-TV Channel 5 in 
Needham, Massachusetts will be 
televising a one hour special on 
Saturday, July 21 at 7:00 p.m., the 
subject of which will be the Black 
Musician's Conference. The Black 
Musician's Conference was 
sponsored by the UMass Black 
Cultural Center and the Program 
Council in April. "The New Music" 
is the name of the program. 



NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The price 
of meat is so high, says Tom 
McGinnis, president of American 
National Foods, that "it has as 
much 'stealability' as cash." 

McGinnis ought to know. Thieves 
evaded an elaborate alarm 
detection system in Super Save 
Discount Foods, a subsidiary of 
American, and made off with 
$4,000 worth of beef loin, bacon, 
sausage and other pork products 
Monday. 



Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 



<IMMCCMATi\_/6>MTACT\ 
«niNT,0N jpflSM Lf*S L 
(MMstftcr I I wrrues P 
ftfMms } Wll siMoy 




l!)!) North Plrusunl St., \n>lirr>i 



• Hey wood Hale Broun • 

Z X 

O CBS Sportscaster © 


* 




Monday July 23 


wood 


I 


8:00 P.M. 


X 


CC Auditorium 


X 




FREE-Open to the public 


mm 

© 


a 


Sponsored by 


m 


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Summer Activities 




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n Hey wood Hale Broun • 




Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 




Debaters 
Get Grant 



The Speech Department at 
UMass has received a $1,000 
departmental assistance grant 
from Gulf Oil Foundation. The 
grant will be used for Debate Union 
activities of the UMass department 
of communication studies. 

Departmental assistance grants 
are designed to further special 
projects proposed by selected 
departments in colleges and 
universities. Together with other 
sections of its educational 
assistance program, Gulf will 
distribute more than $2.5 million in 
awards to students and institutions 
of higher education this year. The 
funds will provide for un- 
dergraduate scholarships, 
graduate fellowships, employee 
gift matching, capital grants, and 
other education purposes. 

Mr. D. S. Macedo, Gulf 
marketing manager, presented the 
check to UMass Chancellor 
Randolph W. Bromery. Assoc. 
Prof. Ronald J. Matlon is director 
of the Debate Union and Mr. 
Richard L. Shoen is assistant 
director. 



Infirmary 
(la 



ergency) 



[54] 5-2671 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 



Rev. Richard 
Pastor 



Koenig, 
549-0322 



Halter Tops $2.50 - $4.95 
Denim Skirts $6.95 



([k£<T TO THE POSf OFFICE ON N. PLSA&ANfgiTi) 




You drink Yago Sant'Gria anywhere, anytime 
you're having fun. So that's when you wear the 
new Yago Sant'Gria T-shirt. It's already being 
seen on the greatest guys and girls on 
campuses, beaches everywhere. It's a real 
good T-shirt, of soft high-quality cotton, 
a conversation-starter, and terrific value at $2.00. 
Says "Anytime, anywhere" on the front and 
"Yago Sant'Gria" on the back in bold red. 
Have several. And have Yago, at school, at home, 
in campers, at beach ana vacation scenes. 
Just bring cups and ice, pour Yago and serve. 
Yago's an Instant Party because it's pre-mixed in 
Spain of rich red wine and the natural 
goodness of Spain's magnificent orange and 
lemon juices. Stock up on Yago and 
send in the coupon Now. 



COUPON 

mail TO: YAGO SANT'GRIA-TS 
P.O. Box 707, Darien, Conn. 06820 



Please send me. 



.Yago Sant'Gria T-shirts 



V* 



(amount) 

@ $2.00 each plus .50 for mailing & handling. 
Size: Q Small Q Large 

□ Medium □ Ex-Large 

I enclose (No stamps please) 

□ Check enclosed D Money order 



NAME. 



ADDRESS. 



CITY. 



STATE. 



—ZIP. 



SCHOOL 

VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY STATE. 



i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 



Yago Sam Gna, Span.sn red w,ne mixed with c.trus imit juices. 23 5 02 • Imported from Spain by Monsieur Henri Wine* Ltd. New York. 



Th« Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Music 



Disaster At Schaefer Stadium 



By KEN SULIN 

Somewhere on the tickets, and in 
fine print mind you, were the 
words "CONCERT WILL BE 
HELD RAIN OR SHINE". There 
had been no scheduled rain date for 
Humble Pie, Edgar Winter and 
Wet Willie; what were the chances 
of rain anyway? The day had been 
clear, sun shining, shirtless people 
tanning, etc. -the evening was a bit 
different, a torrential downpour. 

Schaefer Stadium is located in 
Foxboro, Massachusetts away 
from the hustle and bustle of 
Boston congestion and "freeway 
madness." The people were 
beginning to gather outside the 
gates as early as 1 p.m. for the 6 
p.m. starting concert. 

In the meantime activity inside 
the stadium, particularly onstage, 
was extremely humorous and 
comical. You see there was no roof 
covering the stage area, not even a 
tarp, so rapid construction began 
of an elaborate weather shield. The 
basic framework of 2x4's however 
collapsed on the stage crew as they 
tried to raise it above the floor- 
boards. Trucks fell off their 
barracades, fence hoppers gained 
free entrance to the concert and 
the moths wetting in everyone's 
hair. 

Approximately 4 p.m. the gates 
were opened and throngs of 
teenage, dope-smoking, tequila- 
drinking longhairs descended upon 
Schaefer's astro-turf. But wait a 
minute-this synthetic grass, 
commonly called astro-turf, was 
completely hidden by a thin green 
covering made of plastic, sup- 
posedly there to protect the 
precious all-weather field. The 
only problem being that a cigarette 
could burn through in a matter of 
seconds and you could be sure 
people would be smoking anything 
from Winstons to pine needles. So 
much for minor hazards. 

By the time most had arrived, a 
small could mass had come 
overhead; it prevented one from 
seeing sunlight or blue sky 
anywhere but surely it wasn't 
going to rain-all forecasts had 
predicted a clear evening. Not 
much was happening by 6 p.m. and 
the same for 7 p.m. yet the crowd 
remained patient, enjoying the 
entertainment that had arisen 
amongst them. There's one in 
every crowd as the saying goes and 
this particular one was simply out 
of his mind. Dancing, screaming, 
skipping, this bearded, young man 
of about 21 decided to please the 
audience by taking off his entire 
set of clothing and prancing 
through the people in ultimate 
merriment. Finally restrained 
after a half hour performance he 
was kindly escorted to the 



stadium's gates. 

A light rain began and so did 
Edgar Winter at about 7:30. At this 
point the spectators were as high 
as kites so when Edgar went into 
his stage antics the audience 
earnestly applauded his every 
motion. The song entitled 
"Frankenstein", being a top-40 hit 



Things were not going well to say 
the least and unfortunately the 
worst was yet to come. 

Chip Monk, remember him from 
Woodstock?, was the master of 
ceremonies telling everyone to 
stay cool and maybe things would 
continue once the rain let up. 
Surprisingly enough the rain did 




Horrendous, the Wet Willie Band 



that everyone recognized, allowed 
Edgar to use his synthesizer 
sensationalism which in turn 
permeated the boppers into, quite 
easily, dimension four. Thunder, 
lightening and yes, more rain came 
while Winter's management said 
no more music. The reason being 
the hig risk element involved with 
the great amounts of voltage 
required by the equipment. 

Remember that green plastic 
over the astro-turf? If you were out 
in a field getting drenched what 
better rain gear could you find? 
These were the exact feelings of 
the spectators so sure enough ten 
to fiteen thousand of them stood on 
the synthetic grass beneath the 
tarp they'd lifted over their heads. 



stop and Edgar returned but only 
for two songs. Again a downpour 
began and it was just no use, things 
simply could not be continued. 
There Chip Monk stood facing 
fifteen thousand growling, insane, 
soaking wet people who were still 
eager to see Wet Willie and 
Humble Pie. 

If there ever w^s a straw that 
broke the camel' i back it came 
with the announcement that the 
concert would be continued the 
following Monday and people 
presently inside the stadium would 
receive a new ticket upon leaving. 
This incidently brought the house 
down with bottle throwers, cherry 
bomb hurlers and profanity pit- 
chers. Nevertheless you know how 



Album Inquest 



Frampton's Camel 
Peter Frampton 
A & M SP 4389 

Peter Frampton's second album 
presents the same diversity of 
styles evidenced on his first album, 
Winds of Change. The production is 
crisper. and thus enhances the 
overall quality of the album. The 
music itself can be loosely 
classified into ballads and rockers, 
both of which Frampton excels at 
writing, performing, and singing. 
Frampton is distinctive in that he 
can play rock without resorting to 
the heavy-handedness that Humble 
Pie has degenerated to since his 
departure, and yet not become 
insipid. This album is not a 
masterpiece that will change your 
life, but could very well make it a 
lot more enjoyable. 
Best Cuts: "Lines On My Face" 

"Do You Feel Like We Do" 

Jeff Willner 



Gold Tailed Bird 
Jimmy Rogers 
Shelter 8921 

Jimmy Rogers, blues musician, 
has been around quite a while and 
is not to be confused with Jimmie 
Rogers, C & W musician. This 
recording on Shelter Records 
projects Rogers as a most ac- 
complished guitarist, vocalist and 
harp player. Ten of twelve cuts are 
original compositions by Rogers' 
hand. The production credits go to 
Freddie King and J. J. Cale. It's 
always refreshing to hear some 
new blues members instead of the 
ole' faithfuls which quite literally 
have been played into the ground. 
Freddie King, plays his well-known 
guitar leads throughout the album 
which only adds to its brilliance 
and excellence . . worth a pur- 
chase. 

Ken Sulin 



For Your Pleasure 

Roxy Music 

Warner Brothers 2696 

For Your Pleasure is the second 
album by Britain's hottest band, 
Roxy Music. But please do not 
think for one moment that Roxy 
Music is another hyped-up group 
like Deep Purple. Their music is 
highly innovative and reflects an 
artistically concerned band. For 
Your Pleasure blends the special 
almost eerie quality of electronic 
music with the 1970's version of 
rock and roll. 

The songs are all written by 
Byran Ferry, a former painter and 
mostly sung by Eno (a prettier 
David Bowie) who "plays" the 
synthesizer. It may take a few 
listenings before you become 
acclimated to their style, but one 
you do you'll find For Your 
Pleasure quite pleasurable indeed. 
(Diane Staaf) 



anxious crowds are to get into a 
concert; well they're 100% more 
anxious to get out, and get out with 
a ticket in hand. 

In baseball a term often used is 
"the squeeze play" and can be 
offensively effective if used 
correctly-much to the amazement 
of the defense. A variation of the 
squeeze play was practiced as the 
night's audience saw themselves 
being popped out the gates without 
a ticket due to the thrust of all 
those behind. What's the natural 
reaction if you've shelled out six 
bucks for a concert and didn't get 
your rain check-of course, go back 
and demand one. So what hap- 
pened was people were attacking 
the ticket men from each of his 360 
degrees. The ticket men, by the 
way, were used to the more passive 
crowds of orderly football fans and 
this being the first rock concert 
ever in Schaefer Stadium was 
nothing but total bedlam, probably 
resulting in a few minor coronaries 
to these aging patriots. 

The field was lKtered, tarps were 
ripped, people were unhappy and 
needless to say everything was in a 
miserable state. Se ya Monday. 

Another beautiful day, a strong 
roof covered the stage, the people 
had cooled off over the weekend 
and this time the festivities began 
on time. Wet Willie, from Macon, 
Georgia, started and seemed as if 
they themselves got soaked 
Wednesday but never dried off. 
Their set was horrendous lacking 
talent and displaying little in the 
way of showmanship. The name of 
the band is quite appropriate, 
figuratively speaking they're all 
wet. 

After the nightmares of Wed- 
nesday, Edgar Winter was not to 
return so at last came Humble Pie. 
Mariot was at his best and the rest 
of his slices seemed to be playing 
with enjoyment as well. (Note: 
Steve Mariot, former member of 
the Small Faces, is now leader of 
Humble Pie). 

The audience had all lit matches 
and thousands of tiny burning 
torches could be seen across the 
stadium. They seemed to be saying 
thank you and showed their ap- 
preciation for Humble Pie-it had 
been a long trek, finally the concert 
was hitting a good note. Pie played 
for over an hour and one half doing 
almost their entire repertoire of 
hits, all along the people cheered, 
were content and later traveled 
home peacefully. 

So went the first rock concert 
ever at Schaefer Stadium. It was in 
two parts, as different as night and 
day, from disaster to success 
nevertheless I'm sure all are glad 
it's over but also glad to be a part 
of it. 




Fabulous Furniture in Your Living 
Room 

Martin Mull 
Capricorn 0117 

Martin Mull is no great musician 
by any means and he well knows it. 
After a mediocre first album we 
are given this ditty and supposed to 
enjoy it. The album is no more than 
a half-assed attempt at an in- 
tellectual comedy record that fails 
miserably. Even his interpretation 
of "Dueling Tubas" becomes a 
lazy, dull excuse for lack of 
originality. Mull does more talking 
and explaining on the album than 
musical work. And like any 
comedy album, once you've heard 
it a few times you seldom listen to 
it again. 

(Ken Sulin) 



Page 6— university of Massachusetts— The Crier 

McGovern's Birthday 

Today In History 



No UFO's For Buffs 



On this day in 1870, the France- 
Prussian War began as France 
declared war on Prussia. 

On this date: 

In 1553, Lady Jane Grey was 
deposed as Queen of England, and 
Mary, the daughter of Henry VIII, 
was put on the throne. 

In 1821, King George IV of 
England was crowned. 

In 1918, during World War I, 
German armies began to retreat 
across this Marne River after 
being defeated in their last great 
offensive in France. 

In 1943, Rome was bombed for 
the first time in World War II. 




In 1965, France charged that a 
U.S. photo reconnaissance plane 
had photographed French nuclear 
production facilities. 

Also in 1965, President Ahmed 
Ben Bella of Algeria was deposed 
in a bloodless coup backed by the 
army. 

Ten years ago, Soviet Premier 
Nikita Khrushchev said in a 
Moscow speech there was hope of 
concluding a treaty for a partial 
ban on nuclear testing. 

Five years ago, President 
Lyndon B. Johnson and President 
Nguyen Van Thieu of South 
Vietnam met in Hawaii to plan 
joint action in the Vietnam war. 

One year ago, leaders of the 
AFL-CIO voted to take a neutral 
stand in the U.S. presidential 
election in November. 

Today's birthdays: Sen. George 
S. McGovern, DSD., is 51. Actor 
Pat Hingle is 49. 

Thought for today: As a well- 
spent day brings happy sleep, so a 
life well spent brings happy death. 
- Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519. 



KINGSTON, N.H. - "Flying 
saucer sightings are rare," Rudi 
D'Allessandro says, "Still, if you 
don't look up, you'll never see 
them." 

D'Allessandro and 34 other sky 
watchers spent last weekend doing 
just that - looking up. But they 
didn't see any flying saucers or 
many other flying things - except 
mosquitoes. 

UFO buffs and members of the 
New England UFO Study Group 
and other far-out organizations 
gathered at the home of Mrs. Betty 
Hill to scan the skies and enjoy 
each other's company. 

From time to time, someone 
would notice a strange twinkle in a 
star or a passing airplane. After a 
few murmurs of excitement, the 
group would settle down to enjoy 
the festivities so obviously snubbed 
by the guests of honor from beyond 
Andromeda. 

"To tell the truth," said Betty 
Hill, "if I thought a flying saucer 
was going to show up, I wouldn't be 
here." 

But the guests who did come 
enjoyed the old fashioned New 



England barbecue as well as the 
alien watch. 

They discussed the Watergate, 
movies, inflation and, of course, 
flying saucers. 

"There are flying saucers," 
insisted Ethel Rogers, president of 
the Brockton, Mass., Para- 
psychology Research Association. 
"They really do exist. The 
government isn't telling the 
people about them." 

Rudi D'Alllessandro's wife, 
Lorraine, of Randolph, Mass., 
spoke about an ancient Egyptian 
scroll found centuries ago which 
mentioned "star people." 

But most of the talk was about 
mosquitoes, who reportedly came 
in small herds to enjoy the 
festivities-as if they had been in- 
vited. 

And looking at speculation that 
insect life might dominate other 
parts of the universe, perhaps the 
little pests had been invited. 



A Masque Ensemble 
Production 

THIS WEEK ONLY! 
"A Party With Porter" 

A Revusical Featuring 
Music of Cole Porter 

Top Of The Campus 
Restaurant 

U. Mass. Campus 

JULY 18-21 

Doors Open At 8:00 PM 
TABLE RESERVATIONS 

CALL 545-2351 
Cover Charge '1.00 



Outing Club Trips 



THURSDAY, July 19, In- 
troductory Rock climbing at 
Chapel Lodge, leaves from bus 
circle in front of Stockbridge Hall. 



Amherst Film 
Coop presents 

FANTASTIC 
VOYAGE 

with 

Raquel Welch 

Stephen Boyd 

Donald Pleasance 

Tonite! 

Mahar 
7:30 & 9:30 



OUTING CLUB SUMMER 
REUNION: This weekend at 
Mount Tobly's Tyler Cabin. Check 
bulletin board for direction and 

information. 

* * * 

OUTING CLUB BULLETIN and 
locker are located opposite the 
ticket office in the Student Union. 




cC* 



THE MOUNT H0LY0KE COLLEGE s 

SUMMER THEATRE J^ 

South Hadley , Mass. «*£» I \/+ 

Proudly presents 
Noel Coward's wild and witty 



BLITHE SPIRIT 



Tues.-Sat., July 17-21 - 8:30 p.m. 

Tickets $2.50 and $3.50 

Students $1 off Tues.-Thurs. 

Box Office open 10 a.m. -9 p.m. (daily except Sunday) 

Phone (413) 538-2406 



AIR COND. 



AMHERSTC^«t 



NOW!! 



AMITY ST. 



253-5426 



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special engage.me: t 
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SHOWN EVENINGS AT 7:00 & 9:00 Sat.-Sun.-2.00 



MONDAY ft TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS SI 00 




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Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show vou all the reasons in the world why BRAND YWINE is a 
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Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently "liveable ". 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 



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and cooking included in rent. 

Kxtra security features. 

Large, partially enclosed private patios 
and balconies 
Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company, Hartford. 
Connecticut 



One bedroom units from $200 
Two bedmom units from $233 



Brandy wine at Amherst 



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50 Meadow St. 
Amherst 

549-0600 



MONDAY: 

7-11:00 a.m. Sign-On with RJ 
9:00 a.m. News, Weather 
11:00 a.m. Rideboard (a Service 
provided for people who need rides 
and offer rides) 

11-3:00 p.m. Stu Goldman's, 
Music ^ 

2:00 p.m. News, Weather 
4:30 - Bandboard (a service 
announcing to the audience the live 
entertainment in the area) 

3:00-6:30 - Music with Ragtime 
Duck 
4:00 - Rideboard 
6:30-7:00 - Off the Hook 
(WMUA's informal call in show 
with hosts John Greeley and Art 
Cohen) 

7:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
Al Feinberg 
7:20 - Off the Hook continued. 
8-9:00 - WMUA's international 
music (Music from different 
countries with host Joe C.) 
9:00-Bandboard 
9-10:00 - Music with Laredo 
10:00-11:00 - Focus with Ken 
Mosakowski 
11:00 - News with Al Feinberg 
11:20-3:00 - Captain Equinox 
12:00 - Rideboard 
TUESDAY: 
7-11:00 - Wake up with RJ 
9:00 News, Weather 
11:00 Rideboard 
11-3:00 - Music with Tom Jodka 
2:00 News, weather 
3-6:30 - Music with Captain 
Equinox 
4:00 - Rideboard 
4:30 - Bandboard 
6:30-7 - Off the Hook 
7:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
Al F. 

7:20-8:00 - Off the Hook con- 
tinued. 
8-11:00 Laredo Rides 
8:00 - Bandboard 
9:00 - Farm Report (Weekly 
interviews with such people as 
Frank Zappa, John Lennon, Ken 
Kesey, Baba Ram Dass, Sun Ra, 
Jerry Garcia, Et 

1:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
A1F. 

11:20-3:00 Chris Sophinos' Music 
for Amherst's nite people 

12:00 - Rideboard 
WEDNESDAY: 
7:00-11:00 Music with Laredo 
9:00 News, Weather 
11:00 Rideboard 

11-3:00 Music with Dick 
Moulding 
2:00 News, Weather 
3:00-6:30 Music with Captain 
Equinox 
4:00 - Rideboard, 4.30 Bandboard 
6:30-7 - Off the Hook with John 
Greeley and Art Cohen 

7:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
Al F. 

7:20-8:00 - Off the Hook con- 
tinued. 
8:00-12:00 - Music with JB 
11:00 News, Weather, Sports 
with Al F. 
12:00 - Rideboard. 
12:00-3:00 a.m. - Music for late 
nite people with RJ 
THURSDAY: 
7:00-11:00- Wake up with Laredo 
9:00 News, Weather, Sports 

Classifieds 

TOC CARDS 

Top of the Campus cards are available to all 
members of the University community for 
$1.00. Rm 823 in Campus Center, call 545 
0416 for appointment for picture to be taken. 

FOR SALE 

TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 1218 
auio changer, SONY TC 55 port, cassette, 
Eico427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 1171. 

17/31 



FOR SALE A 

Pioneer SX 770 Stereo receiver and pair of 
LKH model seventeen speakers. J275 or 
best offer. Call Mark 545 2093 days. 

17/19 

FOR SALE 
1967 Mustang, V8, A.T., Air cono\, P.S., 
57,000 miles, excellent cond. 568 7521.^^ 

. MONEY 

Earn $2.00 for participating in a Psychology 
Experiment. Requires l hour, no nox.ous 
stimuli. Call Shirley at 545-0071 for Apt. ^ 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

Room available Immediately: own 

bedroom in 5-room apt. with large kitchen. 

Walk to school. Only »75/mo.. all utll. Call 

549 6013 morn. 

M7/1? 

DRIVER WANTED 

To Miami area at the end of July. Call S4f- 

1532 or 1 783 245V 

N7/24 



U1MUA 



11:00 - Rideboard 
11-3:00 - Rod Hanson 
2:00 News, Weather 
4:00 - Rideboard 
3 : 00-6 : 30 - Of f the Hook with John 
Greeley and Art Cohen 

7:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
Al F. 

7:20-8:00 - Off the Hook con- 
tinued. 
8:00-11:00 - Ragtime Duck 
8:00 - Bandboard 
9:00 - Farm Report 
11:00 - News, weather, Sports 
with Al F. 

11-3:00 - Music with Chris 
Sophinos 

12:00 - Rideboard 
FRIDAY: 
7-11:00 - Laredo Rides 
9:00 News, Weather 
11:00 - Rideboard 
11:00-3:00 Rod Hanson 
2:00 News, Weather 
3-6:30 - Music and other things 
with Captain Equinox 
4:00 - Rideboard 
4:30 - Bandboard 
6:30-7 - Off the Hook with John 
Greeley and Art Cohen 

7:00 News, Weather, Sports with 
Al F. 

7:20-8:00 - Off the Hook con- 
tinued. 

8:00-11:00 - Tom Jodka plays 
those tunes 
8:30 - Bandboard 
11:00 News, Weather, Sports 
with Al F. 

11:20-3:00 - Music to Boogie to on 
a Friday nite with Ragtime Duck 
Dick Moulding. 

12:00 - Rideboard 
SATURDAY: 

7-11:00 - Wake up with Olaf 
Weeks 
9:00 News, weather 
11:00 - Rideboard 
11-3:00 - Music to Suntan to with 
Tom Jodka 
2:00 News, Weather 
4:00 - Rideboard 
4:30 - Bandboard 
3-7:00 - Rocket Rick 
7:00 News, Weather, Sports 



7:00-11:00 Music with JB 

11:00 News, Weather 

11-3:00 - Radar brings home the 
week with fine music 

12:00 - Rideboard 
SUNDAY: 

11:00 - Ah Wil Wakes you up 

2:00 News, Weather 

3:00-7:00 - Art Cohen's Music for 
a Sunday afternoon 

4:00 Rideboard 

4:30 Bandboard 

7:00 News, Weather 

7:00-10:00 - Some fine Jazz with 
Charles Mann 

10-12:00 - Old times with Johnny 
Sutton, solid gold 

11:00 News, Weather, Sports 

12:00 - 3:00 - Music with Tom 
Jodka 

Monday 

Monday, July 23rd, at 10 P.M., 
WMUA (UMass radio, 91.1 FM) 
will broadcast a discussion on the 
problems of migrant workers in 
Western Massachusetts. 

The program is being presented 
as a special feature of "Focus," 
WMUA's weekly public affairs 
series moderated by Ken 
Mosakowski. 

Mosakowski's guest for the live, 
60-minute forum will be Roger 
James, an instructor in the Sacred 
Heart School's Transitional 
Migrant Program which is based 
in Springfield, Mass. 

Mr. James appeared earlier this 
week on WMUA's new weekday 
call-in program "Off The Hook," 
which is hosted by John Greeley 

and Art Cohen. 

• * * 

INTERNATIONAL MUSIC 

Monday evening, July 23, at 8 
p.m., WMUA's International Music 
Series will feature popular and 
traditional music from Korea. 
Hong Sah Myung will join host Joe 
C. to provide commentary on the 
artists and music of the "Land of 
the Morning Calm." 
91.1 FM STEREO 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 

Cary Prize Awarded 

Richard M. Hanchett of Sudbury is the 1973 recipient of the Harold Cary 
Prize in history at UMass. 

The award is given annually to th* graduating history major who 
compiled the most distmguiatoerl academic record in history. It was 
established in 1969 to honor UMass Prof. Harold Cary who retired that 
year. 

Richard Hanchett is the aon of Mr. Richard G. Hanchett of 343 Willis 
Road, Sudbury and a graduate of Lincoln-Sudbury High School. His 
primary interest in history is in the pre-Civil War period. Richard was 
accepted for graduate study at the University of North Carolina but 
decided to postpone graduate work to get some high school teaching 
experience in Milford, N.H. 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Yesterday's Puzzle 



ACROSS 

1 Man's name 
4 Manuscript 

(abbr.) 
6 Country of 

Europe 
11 Sofa 
13 Shred 

15 Symbol for tan- 

talum 

16 Raise 

18 Compass point 

19 Note of scale 

21 Jog 

22 Location 
24 Apportion 
26 Cease 

28 Ancient 

29 Get up 
31 Ireland 

33 Plural ending 

34 Supercilious 

person 

36 Let it stand 

38 French article 

40 Man's name 

42 Gather in at 

one stroke 
45 Everyone 
47 Walk 

'49 Biblical weed 
50 Partner 
52 Allowance for 

waste 

54 Sun god 

55 Latin conjunc- 
tion 

56 Let go 
59 Conjunction 
61 Purify 
63 Alighted 

65 Sows 

66 Senior (abbr.) 

67 Anger 



3 Pronoun 

4 Liquefy 

5 Prophets 

6 Stationary part 

of machine 
(pi.) 

7 Stroke 

8 The sweetsop 

9 Pronoun 
10 Cuddle up 
12 Symbol for 

tellurium 

14 Musical instru- 
ments 

17 Ballot 

20 Great bustard 

23 Maiden loved 

by Zeus 

24 Parent (collog.) 

25 Slave 

27 Fruit seeds 
30 Vast ages 
32 Eft 

35 Glass con- 
tainers 




37 Rip 

38 More crippled 

39 Puffs up 
41 Withered 

43 Rubber on pen- 

cil 

44 Hebrew letter 
46 Army officer 

(abbr.) 
48 Tolls 



5 1 Great Lake 
53 Former Russian 
ruler 

57 Goal 

58 Printer's- 

measure 
60 Poem 

62 Symbol for iron 
64 Roman gods 




m 



Page S— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Marty Kelley 



Martin Finds A Home 



Amherst - Just how crucial can 
the delivery of 40 cases of coke be? 
How often do the phones ring at 
Schaefer Stadium? What color ink 
do you want your roster typed in? 
Well, if you had to adhere to un- 
certainties such as these to get 
your masters degree, you may 
very well question the validity of 
post graduate education. .or 
better yet, wait for life to catch you 
September first. 

Right now that's pretty much the 
case for UMass masters candidate 
Brian Martin, a former captain of 
the UMass baseball team. For the 
Lowell native life starts anew 
September one. That's when his 
tenure as a summer intern with the 
New England Patriots comes to a 
close. With respect to the formality 
of an oral examination in August 
on his Patriot sabbatical, Martin 
will be Lowell bound to teach 
physical education and hopefully 
fit into the baseball program this 
fall. But there's quite a story to be 
told before September come she 
will. 

For all intents and purposes 
Brian might as well wear a skirt. 
In the absence of curvacious 
secretary Dusty Rhoades, now 
with tycoon attorney Bob Wolfe, 
Martin has been employed as a 
regular turnstyle behind a Patriot 
desk. . . but he's hardpressed to fill 
Dusty's shoes. . . literally. 

"You know there's a tremendous 
amount of responsibility to this 
job," admits Martin rather 
bluntly. "I'm supposed to know 
everything that Dusty, the former 
full time secretary, did. So when 
the guy asks me if 40 cases of coke 
is enough, it's pretty much my 
decision to make." Fortunately for 
Brian football systems survive 
above and beyond pestilent coke 
decisions. . .but barely the 
Patriots. 

Not nearly as blatant as 



Watergate and far less reaching 
than a Kissinger peace. . .but still it 
was pretty much a known fact that 
mismanagement was the main 
contributor to the derailment of 
last year's 3-11 Patsies. . The only 
thing certain around Schaefer 
Stadium come Christmas last was 
a definite need for more toilets... 

But there's new carpet in the 
Patriot lounge this summer and 
Martin is pretty impressed with 
the Oklahoma experience. . ."I'm 
simply amazed by the fact that 
these coaches are able to get up 
every morning," said Martin of the 
Fairbanks regime. "Every single 
minute of the day is planned. And 
when you would think that the day 
is over, the coaches are all in 
general sessions with the players 
at night to plan the following day's 
events." At least such dedication 
should sell you a few exhibition 
tickets. 

Organization or no organization 
pro football is still a business and 
although Brian never sees where 
Patriot tax money goes, the dif- 
ference between college and pro 
football is self evident. "If they 
need something for the next like 
numbers on some practice shirts, 
says Brian, they'll fly out for it the 
next night. They're pretty efficient 
down here and concerning money 
they don't mind paying for talent". 

.Yes, the Plunkett franchise is a 
bit steep... and supposedly soon to 
be productive. . hmmm. . . 

But for now Brian could be 
bothered with the statistics ahead. 
When the Pats break eamp here its 
off to Foxboro for the intern who 
just missed with the Red Sox. And 
now the fireworks at Fenway 
begin. 

But for now the phone keeps 
ringing 8 to 4. The company's still 
the same in the lounge with Art 
Warren of UMass Food Services 
quizzing youthful Denny Lynch 







Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

WOW-SAT. 10:00-8:00 T «U«k eoz o-T« 

THURS.&FRI. til 9:00 'elephone 586-3727 

SALE 

USED JEANS 2for $ 3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 

2 for *2 

2 for $ 6 

75' 

2 for $ 3 



WORK SHIRTS 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 

USED VESTS 




ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS $ 7'° •»«••»»•« 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 

FOR $C A 

oNir J»V 







Lacrosse 



Lacrosse summer style con- 
tinues this Sunday afternoon as the 
undefeated Amherst Lacrosse Club 
(3-0) meets the Winchester 
Lacrosse Club at 2 p.m. Bring 
some beer. 



Making sure the coke arrives in Amherst safely this summer is 
Patriot intern and UMass masters candidate Brian Martin. One of 
Brian's hierachy this summer is Patriot Assistant Public Relations 
Director Denny Lynch. 




New Power Plant To Open In December 




Amherst's Tire Store- 
Firestone Shell Jetzon 

MICHELIN X Veith 
Le Havre Radial Tires 





Steel Belted 



Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 




(Assistant PR) on his golf game. 
The Springfield-Worcester-Boston 
contingent of writers still mill 
around like Patriot puppets and 
even a grade 8 janitor or two will 
sneak a peek at the big time. 

But for Brian Martin its nice to 
feel pretty top shelf until Sep- 
tember 1st. . .It makes no dif- 
ference. . He's headed there 
anyway. . . 



B PLAZA SHELL ® 




By CYNTHIA ROGERS 

UMass will be opening a new power plant, the Tilson Farm Boiling 
Plant, this December. This new plant, located at Tilson Farm off E 
Pleasant Street, is a replacement of the old one, and "will meet and ex- 
ceed all present and future pollution control standards," according to 
Henry Langill of Physical Plant. 

The new plant, unlike its coal-fired predecessor will be oil fired It can 
also be converted at low cost to burn gas. For campus use only this 
boiling plant will be used to generate steam, heat, hot water, air con- 
ditioning units and a percentage of electricity. The old plant will become 
a distribution center, utilizing the steam from the new olant, and also will 
be used in case of dire emergency. 

The Tilson Farm Boiling Plant is costing the state roughly $10 million 
which includes tie lines to all distribution systems and also for some 
replacement of existing lines. This figure is far less than it would cost to 
repair and maintain the still existing plant. Besides eliminating the cost 
of trucking coal and using a low sulfur content to keep down pollution, the 
new plant will be superior in its production of steam. It will be capable of 
generating 450,000 pounds of steam per hour at 375 F., whereas the old 
plant was only capable of generating 310,000 pounds at 275 F. The new 
plant will also have two fuel tanks which can hold up to 500,000 gallons of 
oil, although this is only a three week supply. 

Construction on the project began April, 1972 and is ahead of schedule 
Already 97% of the pipe lines are complete. There are 6 miles of pipes on 
one line. These pipes are all underground and insulated. Plans for the new 
boiling plant came about 3 years ago. At the demand of the University 
the United Engineers and Constructors were responsible for the ar- 
chitecture. E.J. Penney of Springfield is the general contractors, and the 
project engineers of UMass acted as the liason between the University 
and the construction companies on the project. 



u 



i 
I 
I 
s 



Rood 



Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPEN 24 HOURS 



h3M 



Read 
S«rv<CS 



: 

2 



mmm oysters 






July 24, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 9 



THURSDAY 



9'O0-l0 



S 



Friday 



John Morgan 

Returns 
to The Pub 



Friday 
Night 



\ 



Xi 



Q 



s 



■ 



■\ 




Governor Francis W. Sargent congratulates new University of Massachusetts student 
Trustees after swearing-in ceremonies at the State House. Shaking hands with the Governor 
is Trustee Reginald Cagle of UMass-Boston. Next is Trustee Nicholas K. Apostola of UMass- 
Amherst. and looking on is UMass President Robert Wood. Trustee Apostola. a resident of 
Southbridge, has been a student body president and student senator on campus from 1970 to 
1973. He was elected student body president and student Trustee last April. Trustee Cagle is 
a resident of Dorchester. During the past three years at UMass-Boston he has been chair- 
man of the Community Action Committee, president of the Afro-American Society, and a 
member of the Campus Governance Bodies. Swearing-in ceremonies were June 28 



D . . ... . . _ Cr 'e r Photo/Gib Fuller-ton 

Poets Irma McLaurm, above. Zoe Best and Bill Hasson will read 
from their works as part of the Rainbow Festival on Wednesday. 
August 1. The poetry readings will follow a musical presentation by 
Jaime Santiago and his Latin American singers. The poets will read 
at 3 p.m. in the Music Listening Room of the Campus Center. 



Reorg Meeting August 2nd 



State Representative James G. Collins of Amherst, today announced 
that the hearings on the Governor's proposed reorganization of education 
would take place on Thursday, August 2, 1973, between 4:00-7:00 in Room 
163 of the Campus Center at the University of Massachusetts. 

The hearings are being conducted by the state Legislative Committee 
on Education which Representative Collins serves. All those interested in 
communicating their views to the committee are urged to contact 
Representative Collins. 

Representative Collins stated, "The proposed reorganization could 
very well have a significant impact on the educational quality within the 
Commonwealth; and for this reason, I would very much like to hear from 
as many different people as possible." 

Any constituents wishing further information can call the Represen- 
tative in Amherst at 549-6886 or at his State House office in Boston at 617- 
727-8946. 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier 



The Crier is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors' 



Stephen G.Tripoli 

Gib Fuller ton 

Cindy Gonet 

Cindy Rogers 

Steve Ruggles 




Sam's on a new kick these aays. 
He thinks he's Marlon Brando. If 
you want to join a Wild Bunch 
come up to the Crier, Room 402 
Student Union. 



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IKmS IK ^p ^* ^*^p» ^f* ^f* ^^ ^p ^p ^p* ^p* ^p* ^p ^p> ^p* ^p* ^» ^p ^p *^^p>^*^p>^p>^p^p^p^pj 



■x- 

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* 

•X" 

•x- 
•x- 

-x- 
* 

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* 



Crier Quiz 




Here's today's Mystery Woman, a celebrity from 
the world of motion pictures. The hint is that she has 
been reported to have a sore throat lately. Don't 
forget, first person to make it to Room 402 Student 
Union with the correct answer gets his/her picture 
in Thursday's Crier. Hurry! 




Here's last Thursday's contest 
winner, Alan Horowitz of 235 River 
Drive in Hadley. He correctly 
guessed Mystery Man as Willis 
Reed of the St. Louis Cardinals, 
oops, we mean New York Knicks. 
His disguise almost fooled us, too. 



* 



"5:*****************************$ 



Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
s i sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



Zamir Nestelbaum 



Here's To My Enemies 



One of the many revelations of the Watergate 
scandal is the horrifying disclosure that Nixon has 
had prepared, in triplicate, and dispersed, an 
enemies list to the whole of his White House Staff. 
Everybody from Ernie Hulshecker, an assistant 
White House Greenskeeper to Billy Snitner who 
works as a grain silo nightwatchman at the San 
Clemente White House, every other spring, got a set 
of "Enemy" Volumes. A complete set numbers 
twenty-four volumes available in paperback and 
hardcover, and was published secretly last fall by 
Clifford Irving Associates. To get an appreciation of 
the scope of the Enemies List, an unidentified source 
reluntantly disclosed that the First Volume was 
"Abzug - Anderson." Furthermore such threats to 
the American Way of Life like Joe Namath, Henry 
Aaron, Julian Bond, Walter Cronkite and Martha's 
Vineyard made the List. Well, not to be outdone, I sat 
down and compiled my own "Enemies List", but I 
hereby am making it public so the following know 
where I stand! 

-Erma, The Elevator Operator at our New World's 
Tallest Libido, for playing musical elevators without 
a chaperone. 

-Dr. Robert Gage and all the other clowns who 
worked out the new parking proposal ~ May a 
diseased Yak park itself in your shorts. 

-Emma Peel. 

-Dean Dwight Allen who was heard by an un- 
disclosed source to remark that "absolutely anyone 
of any race, color, creed, moral persuasion or odor 
has the God Given right to make out an application to 
my Graduate School." 

-Joe "Can you direct me to the Blue Wall" Fresh- 
man. 

-Jim West for low dealing and other debauchery up 
at Orchard Hill - May you be given a hot Vicks 
enema. 

-Barney Rubble. 

-Chancellor Randolph Bromery who promised that 
the Library would definitely not sink. Shades of the 
Titanic. 

-Artemus Gordon - United States Secret Service for 
terrible over acting. 

-Marcel Breuer, the Architect who designed the 
Waffle, also known as the Campus Center, - May you 
be given a frontal lobotomy with a Bic pen. 

-Bebe Rebozo. 

-Governor Francis Sargent - a man known for his 



undying loyalty to his men, like John Boone, etc. 

-"The Happy Hooker"- Exaviara Hollander who 
enjoys her line of work to the limit - may your supply 
of Ben-Gay be cut off. 

-Strom Thurmond - May an armidillo with a 
terminal case of the bends sit on your face. 

-Ralph Waldo Emerson. - For having Waldo as 
your middle name. 

-Ralph Cramden - I don't like the name Ralph 
much either. 

-Louise Day Hicks - for running for everything but 
the Boston City Dog Catcher. Do they Bus dogs? 

-Keith Magnuson - for taking a Wrister from 
Worcester. 

-Billy Graham - for being a cracker. 

-Reverend Ike!!! Why not! 

-Frank Gifford - The Hallmark of controversy. 

-Guru Mahara Ji - the 15 year old perfect master 
who is known to remark that "those who look for a 
TRUE PIECE, get it." 

-Joan "David" Baez - "my husband David is in 
jail, oh yes he is. He is a man of conscience - oh yes! ! 
and won't you buy my album called "David" and 
some "David T-shirts", "David" love beads and 
"David" posters. 

-Ed "the Fox" Kasko - for High Crimes and 
Misdemeanors, especially for giving Orlando Cepeda 
the bunt sign. 

-Jacques Brels - who is alive and well but in 
Paris? Why not Pittsburgh. 

-June Lockhart. 

-Bones Morely - "Egad!!! Don't press that But- 
ton!" 

-Eddie Shack - Clear the Track!!!! 

-Howard Hughes - the Man of the Minute. 
OOooops, time's up. 

-Ernie Boch - may a soiled ministicker be shoved 
up you rhododendron, sideways. 

This is just a small sampling of my list, which is 
much more extensive. I might be willing to sell my 
private list to any interested American. Legion 
Chapter. After all, Enemies Lists are just a part of 
good clean government. However my biggest enemy 
is that one that I have saved for last, the one most 
despicable to any red blooded college youth, the one 
that makes ever so many good clean strong lads 
quiver and hovel before her infamous evil, the one 
that is called PRUDENCE VIRTUE. 



Letters To The Editor 



We're Looking For People 



To The Editor: 

One night early last spring one of my co-workers 
pointed out that Springfield had made the Big Time. 
Much to my amazement the big dot in Western Mass. 
was referred to in Jack Anderson's column. He had 
hit the nail on the head as far as what was going to 
happen in the city this summer. He predicted that it 
would be a long, hot summer in the field of landlord- 
tenant relations. He could not have been more 
correct! 

Even though you might not be aware of it, just 
twenty miles down Route 91 there is a seemingly 
feudal battle going on between the Springfield 
Housing Authority and the people that live in Public 
Housing. There are about five thousand tenants who 
are living under the czarist rule of the Housing 
Authority. These people are tired of being told how 
they are supposed to live, thus they started a tenant 
organization. The Springfield City-wide Public 
Housing Tenants Organization is striving to give 
themselves a say in how they live and what policies 
effect them, but moreover, what the policies are. 

In Public Housing now, the Housing Authority tells 
you what if anything you can put on your walls, if you 
can put anything different in your apartment (i.e. 
hang a shelf) and if you can or can't have over-night 

A UMass "Scholar" 

To The Editor: 

Once again, another one of UMass' "finest 
scholars" demonstrated his ability to set an example 
before an audience of nostalgic Hoody Doody fans 
and their children. 

Who, disguised as Pierre the Baker, complete with 
waxy mustache and baker's hat, snuck on stage 
before an unsuspecting crowd that then believed he 
was just part of the act. Pierre then proceeded to 
dump a chocolate cream pie on Buffalo Bob and a 
slightly out of tune piano in the Student Union 
Ballroom. Not until the act was completed and the 
look of astonishment swept over Bob's face did the 
fact that the pie thrower was not part of the act 
become apparent. 

With a slight tremble in his voice, Buffalo Bob stood 
before the mike with a small crown of cream on his 
head, and commented that never in a tour of 175 
colleges over the past two years, had something like 
this ever happened before the Howdy Doody Review 
came to UMass for the second time. 

Since the Pie Man showed his obvious immaturity 
and lack of good taste, others will have to suffer 
because of his obnoxious prank. Our deepest 
apologies go out to Buffalo Bob and the ballroom 
piano. 

Martha and Ron Turner 



visitors. Could you live like that? 

Well, they do everyday and will continue to unless 
they can keep their Tenant Organization alive. The 
primary goals of the organization are to create safe, 
sanitary and decent housing for all in Public Housing. 
However, more than anything they want to destroy 
the picture that most everyone has of Public Housing 
tenants (lazy, filthy and pregnant). Another goal is to 
rid themselves of the desperation and hopelessness 
that goes with their current life-style. The Housing 
Authority has got to start listening to what they say 
and really hear it! They have got to end their passive 
attitude toward things that need to be done but still 
aren't. 

They don't want people to think that they're stupid, 
ignorant husslers, they just want people to realize 
that they are people, maybe less fortunate than 
others but they still have pride and the good sense to 
know that it doesn't have to be this way. 

Springfield City-Wide Tenants Organization is 
looking for people to work as community organizers. 
If you are interested either call the Univ. Year for 
Action or come to the table in the C.C. Concourse 
Tuesday. 

Simon Mielniczuk 

Help The Farmworkers 

To The Editor: 

350 farmworkers from Puerto Rico are now living 
and working in the immediate neighborhood of 
Amherst. Most of them came directly from Puerto 
Rico and live in large and small barracks scattered 
throughout the valley. The men plan to stay here till 
harvest-time when they will rejoin their families 
whom they have to leave behind. 

"Operation Friendship" is a group of volunteers 
who visit the camps and bring Spanish language 
papers, books and periodicals to the workers who are 
both physically and culturally isolated in English- 
speaking Massachusetts. We have serviced six 
camps on a weekly basis for the last five years. Oc- 
casionally we organize outings or fiestas to relieve 
the monotony of camp life. 

"Operation Friendship" needs more volunteers to 
help carry on this summer's activities. Drivers 
willing to use their own car are very welcome. It 
would also help to have more Spanish-speaking 
volunteers. Anybody interested in participating 
should contact Nancy Thompson, tel. 584-7652. Bonnie 
Isman, tel. 549-1026, or Sabina Cournoyer, tel. 252- 
5125. 

Sabina Cournoyer 



«r1T — jtt'-ijrt^B?. «-m %r. 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



Preservation Hall Jazz Band Here Thursday 




Three members of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, De De Pierce (trumpet), Willie Humphrey 
(clarinet), and Jim Robinson (trombone), do their thing. They'll be here Thursday night to do it for you. 



Campus Carousel 



Watergate At Commencement 



SINGLEMINDEDNESS of 

commencement speakers at 
Stanford, this year, has been noted 
by The Stanford Observer in a page 
one piece. 

The writer observes that a 
common thread tying the talks of 
four different speakers was 
"Watergate and what the Class of 
1973 might do about it." 

A few of the key words spoken 
included "Scandal. . institutional 
reform. . political disillusionment. 

Diogenes. . .cynicism, 
revolutionary effort. . elective 
form of monarchy. . coun- 
tervailing forces. . the silence of 

the good people." 

* * * * 

HEADLINE OF THE WEEK has 

been discovered atop a story 
recounting John W. Dean's 
dragging of the Administration's 
dirty laundry to the Senate 
hearings on Watergate: "Dean 
does Dick dirty." It appeared in 

the Indiana Daily Student. 

* * » * 

COMING OF AGE for 18-year- 

Snakes! 

HOWE. Okla. « Mrs. Sim 
Phillips said she killed a snake 
behind her house here and left it for 
her husband to see when he 
returned home. 

Her daughter, Mrs. Bobbie 
Mead, dropped by. So Mrs. Phillips 
took her out to see the snake. 

There were two. 

They killed the second one and 
put both snakes on display. 

Mrs. Mead's husband came by, 
and the woman took him out to 
view their snakes. 

There were three. 

But this time, "We got rid of 
them," Mrs. Phillips said. "I didn't 
want to take a chance that there'd 
be another one by the time my 
husband got home." 



Creation 

Antiques 



olds at the U of South Florida was 
celebrated by The Oracle 
newspaper, which sponsored a 
beer party at a place called the 
"Wits End." 

The State has recently legalized 
age 18 as the age of majority. The 
Oracle donated three kegs of beer 

to mark the event. 

♦ * ♦ * 

PROGRAM NEXUS has been 
established to provide instant 



answers to student questions at the 
University of Kentucky. 

"Nexus" (meaning to connect) 
contains a file on 87 tapes that 
answer the most common 
problems of students who can dial 
for the information. The tapes also 
included lists of persons who may 
be contacted for more details. 

The program costs less than 
$2,000. The concept is credited to 
the University of Wisconsin. 



Course Catalogue Available 



A catalogue listing the more than 
100 evening courses to be offered 
this fall at UMass is now available 
from the UMass Division of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

Courses offered for University 
credit in Continuing Education are 
equivalent, in every respect to 
regular University courses. Any 
person who has graduated from 
high school or who has a Cer- 
tificate of General Education 
Development is entitled to enroll in 
courses offered by the division, 
though course participating in no 
way implies acceptance as a 
matriculated student. 

The evening courses are in ad- 
dition to the regular University day 
courses which are open to Con- 
tinuing Education students on a 
space available basis. 

Mail registration for the fall 
term begins on July 30; there is no 
registration fee for student ap- 
plications received before Aug. 24. 
A $5 registration fee is required of 



all students who register after Aug. 
26. Graduate and undergraduate 
in-person registration will be held 
Aug. 27-Sept. 1 in Worcester Dinin 
Commons, and late registration 
will be held Sept. 4-Sept. 6 in 320 
Arnold House from 12 to 7 p.m. 
Classes begin on Sept. 7. 

Anyone interested in obtaining a 
catalog or arranging academic 
counseling should write to: 
Evening Program, 315 Arnold 
House, University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass., 
01002, telephone (413) 545-0480. 

Crier 

News 

Hotline 
545-0617 




the finest in 



clothes 
jewelry 
glass 
etcetera 



Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy 4 trad*, too. 



[[AMHERST'S Sm DEPARTMEMF STORE// " 

Bedspreads $5.50 to $7.50 
Oriental Design Rugs 

$5.95 and up 



The world famous Preservation Hall Jazz Band will appear here in a 
concert at Haigis Mall, University of Massachusetts, 7 p.m. on July 26 
(Thursday) . The band is on tour from its home in legendary New Orleans 
where the members of the group all took part in the birth of our most 
American art form. 

Each of the members of the Preservation Hall Jazz Bands has 
memories of the days when jazz, or jass as they spelled it at the turn of 
the century, was taking form and shape and becoming a separate kind of 
music. They were in the bands that marched to and from the cemetery for 
funerals, they were in the wagons that drove up and down French Quarter 
streets and battled it out when two bands met at a corner. They were on 
the river boats, in the saloons and 'sporting houses' and dances. In fact, 
they were the people who added their names to Freddy Keppard, Buddy 
Bolden, Louis Armstrong, King Oliver and Jelly Roll Morton in the ex- 
citing history of an American art form that grew from many sources in 
the special culture that was New Orleans. 

These are the people who made the history. But their vitality and 
youthful drive is still apparent in the singing, happy music of New 
Orleans and a concert today is full of the same spirit that made jazz the 
uninhibited music of the period around the first world war. 

People from all over the world have made Preservation Hall at 726 St. 
Peter Street a priority on trips to New Orleans, it has become something 
like a pilgrimage. But the real pilgrims are the musicians who have been 
.traveling the United States and the world to bring the true New Orleans 
jazz played by the people who have played it for 50 years in the Parishes 
around New Orleans. They know the music best, and they play it the way 
it was created. 

New Orleans music is happy music, it is simple in technical terms, and 
complex in performance. It is not the straw hats and display of the 
"Dixieland" bands, nor is it the "Nicksieland" of New York. It won't 
cease to exist when these wonderful people are no longer with us, but it 
will never be the same because New Orleans Jazz is an attitude, a 
freedom of the spirit, and a memory of parades and dances and a good 
life. It is made up of years when a musician had to have the stamina to 
play several hours after another job on the docks or in the fields because 
he loved to play his horn. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Bands have been quietly taking their place 
among the leading American concert attractions for several years. Each 
year the tours get longer, the audiences get bigger and young and old 
Americans are finding a happy evening in a theatre or concert hall. The 
band members are not concerned with a message, they are bringing joy 
and sorrow in their stamps and blues. Feet aren't often still while the 
band is playing and the everlasting youth and vigor of the players leaps 
across the footlights into the hearts of everyone in the audience. The line 
behind the band members as they lead a march through the hall at the 
end of the concert is testimony to the happiness that fills the hall when the 
band is there. 

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band will appear in concert on Haigis Mall 
in front of the Whit more Administration Building this Thursday, July 26, 
at 7 p.m. The concert is open to the public. In case of rain the location will 
be the Campus Student Union Ballroom. Summer students with I.D. will 
be seated first. 

Teaching Fencing 
To The Blind 

ALBANY, CALIF.-Twenty blind men and women are learning fencing 
here by honing their senses of hearing and touch. 

"It is tremendous the way a human body can refine other senses to 
compensate for the loss of one," said Julius Palffy-Alpar, instructor at 
the California State Orientation Center for the Blind. 

Every fencer uses hearing and touch, he said. "Foils are antennae. The 
sound, the movement the fencer feels tell him something. There is a 
communication between two blades." 

Zarna Allen-a Fontana, Calif., housewife who lost her sight in a car 
accident last year-said fencing requires the same sensitive touch as the 
walking cane. 

"It's very good practice. The walking cane is a kind of foil," she said. 

Palffy-Alpar agreed, saying the students use the cane to project their 
touch, to see through their fingertips. 

"They can learn to use the foil to find their way in space, to use it as a 
long pencil, drawing circles and lines, projecting it to a point in space." 

He tells the blind students: "When you feel that the pressure of the 
other blade is released, you bring your blade to the other side, and if you 
do not engage the other blade there, you bring it back." 

The opponent must strike from one side or the other, he added. If the 
blind fencer's timing is right, his reflexes quick and the opponent doesn't 
win the guessing contest, he'll catch the blade again. 

Palffy-Alpar, coach of the 1936 Hungarian Olympic champion fencing 
team, tested the effect of sight loss on fencing in classes at the University 
of California at Berkeley. He blindfolded his physical education students 
and scored their touches and misses. 

He says he will compare their results with those of the blind students 
when they have mastered a few more skills. Most are about halfway 
through their 20-lesson course. 



Amherst's Tire Store 



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Firestone Shell Jetzon 
MICHELIN X Veith Uriiu 
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Professional American * 
Foreign Car Repair 




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Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 
©PIN 24 HOURS 



w 



Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 

And A Pie In The Face, Too 



The Criar— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Buffalo Bob Turns It On 




Photos 

by 

Steve Ruggles 





By STEVE TRIPOLI 

After a month long buildup of everything from 
publicity to Peanut Gallery contests the Howdy 
Doody Revival featuring Buffalo Bob Smith finally 
made it to campus last Wednesday night. The buildup 
apparently had some effect, as over 1,000 people 
packed the Student Union Ballroom to see the show, 
something that's rarely accomplished even during 
the regular year when there are considerably more 
people on campus. 

As for the show itself, it appears that a lot of people 
had mixed feelings about it. The first 45 minutes or so 
was taken up by a 1957 film of the tenth anniversary 
of the network version of the show, and it appeared to 
bore some of the people in the audience, especially 
the little kids who have no recollection of the show (it 
went off the air for good in 1960). 

The live segment was something else, especially 
the beginning. For openers, the master of ceremonies 
was a fairly well known person in UMass circles, 
former WMUA sports announcer and newspaper 
columnist Marty Kelley. Marty, his obnoxious self as 
usual, introduced the act and slipped in a few jokes 
himself. 




Buffalo Bob had some tricks up his sleeve, too. The 
joke of the night came early in the show when Buf- 
falo, playing one of the oldies from the show on the 
piano, hit a clinker. Upon investigation of the inside of 
the piano Buffalo produced a familiar sight around 
here, a zig-zag package, and disgustingly exclaimed 
"That Dr. Gage, you never know where he'll leave his 
papers." That one had the audience rolling in the 
aisles. 

The rest of the show included a lot of other 
memories, including songs from the show, a question 
and answer period (in which, among other things, 
Buffalo revealed that he's 55 years old and a father of 
three, ranging in age from 18 to 31), and a Howdy 
Doody trivia contest involving four people from the 
audience. There was also a 40 person Peanut Gallery, 
including some Peanuts who should have turned in 
their Gallery cards at least 15 years ago. Just looking 
at some of them was pretty amusing. 

There was also a somewhat unscheduled happening 
as about half way through the show a still unknown 
person dressed as Pierre the baker (a character in 
the old Doody show) walked up behind Buffalo on 
stage and tried to hit him with cream pie. He was only 



Peanuts Eat It Up 




partially successful. Most of the audience, thinking it 
was part of the show, didn't say anything as the fake 
Pierre crept up, and some thought it had been part of 
the show right till the end. But not Buffalo Bob, who 
was really rather angered by the joke. He confided 
after the show that it was probably fortunate that he 
didn't catch the culprit on stage. He probably would 
have given him a lot more than a Tootsie Roll. 

But even though the entertainment wasn't top notch 
all the time and some people got less than they ex- 
pected out of the show, it was still a good night to play 
kid for a few hours and remember the worry free 
days of your youth. As far as that goes, you'd have to 
go a long way to top Buffalo Bob Smith and the 
memories his act recalled. 





Page 6— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 

"Bus Stop" Feature 
At MH Theatre 



Stranded in Grace's Diner in a 
small midwestern town, we find a 
rambunctious first-time-off-the- 
ranch cowboy, the young, sexy 
night club singer, he has 
uproariously abducted, the 
cowboy's friend, and a drunken 
professor. Add the waitresses in 
the diner and some colorful local 
types, and you've got William 
Inge's BUS STOP. The com- 
bination of Inge's characters 
makes for an evening of laughs, 
love, a little music, and a warm, 
down-home feeling. 

In the cast, directed by Sandy 
Shinner, who directed PRIVATE 
LIVES last summer, and READY 
WHEN YOU ARE, C.B.!, are 
Michael Walker (who opened the 



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season in the tent as Dick Christie 
in PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM) as the 
cowboy, Bo Decker; Jim But- 
terfield (who is currently ap- 
pearing as Charles Condomine in 
BLITHE SPIRIT) featured here as 
the faithful guitar-playing friend; 
and Nan Greenwald (who ap- 
peared earlier in the season as 
Annie in READY WHEN YOU 
ARE, C.B.!) as the naively in- 
nocent waitress. The humor of BUS 
STOP, one of Inge's best, lies in a 
wonderful, small town, folksy 
feeling ■ 

Tickets, at $2.50 and $3.50, may 
be purchased at the box office, 
open daily except Sunday from 
10:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. They may 
be ordered by telephoning the box 
office at 538-2406. There is a 
discount of $1.00 off the ticket price 
for student tickets on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday 
evenings. 

BUS STOP will run today 
through Saturday at the Mount 
Holyoke College Summer Theatre 
on the Mount Holyoke College 
campus in South Hadley. Parking 
is plentiful, and signs directing one 
to the tent-on-the-green are visible 
as soon as you drive on campus. 



Five-College Undergrads 
Conducting Research 



Six top undergraduate students 
from the Five-College area are 
conducting research in geology 
from Labrador to the Yucatan 
Peninsula this summer under a 
grant from the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) to the 
University of Massachusetts 
department of geology and 
geography. 

Two juniors from Mount Holyoke 
College, Dita Runkle of La Canada, 
Cal., and Margaret Saunders of 
Chester, N. J., are part of a 
"troubleshooting team" with an 
interuniversity research group in 
Labrador. They are making 
detailed geologic maps of selected 
areas, and collecting rock samples 
for laboratory study, using por- 
table diamond-tipped core drills. 

The Mount Holyoke students 
travel in the field area by research 
vessel, freight canoe, and float- 
equipped aircraft, and live in tents 
set up at each work site. Their 
work will lead to better un- 
derstanding of the origin of the 
earth's continental crust during 
Precambrian time, about 1.5 
billion years ago. 



Tanglewood Weekend 



LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS - 

The fourth weekend at Tanglewood 
begins on Friday, July 27, with the 
7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude con- 
cert featuring Peter Lagger, bass, 
and Malcolm Frager, piano, in a 
program of songs by Beethoven: 
"In questa tomba oscura", 
"Bitten", "Vom Tode", "Die Ehre 
Gottes aus der Natur", "Ich liebe 
dich", "Wonne der Wehmut" and 
"An die feme Geliebte". At 9:00 
p.m., William Steinberg, former 
Music Director of the Boston 
Symphony and Music Director of 
the Pittsburgh Symphony since 
1952, will conduct the Boston 
Symphony in an all-Brahms 
program. 

On Saturday, July 28 at 10:30 
a.m., as on every Saturday mor- 
ning throughout the Tanglewood 



season, there will be an Open 
Rehearsal of works to be per- 
formed on Sunday. 

On Saturday evening at 8:30 
p.m., William Steinberg will 
conduct the Orchestra in 
Schubert's Symphony no. 8 in B 
minor ("Unfinished") and 
Mahler's Das Lied der Erde (The 
Song of the Earth) with tenor 
James King and contralto Lili 
Chookasian as soloists. 

On Sunday, July 29 at 2:30 p.m., 
Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos, 
Musical Director of the National 
Orchestra in Madrid, will conduct 
the Boston Symphony in their first 
performance of Turina's La 
oracion del torero. The concert 
continues with Bartok's Piano 
concerto no. 2 . 



Isolde Koenig of Chicago, 111., a 
junior at Smith College, is con- 
ducting water resources studies in 
the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico 
under the direction of Professor D. 
O. Doehring. She will also take part 
in a special inter-American 
meeting in Mexico City on Science 
and Man in the Americas. Miss 
Koenig's work involves the ap- 
plication of geology to water 
resource planning in a region 
undergoing spectacular 
demographic change. 

Three students from UMass are 
conducting research in Amherst, 
Newfoundland, and the Adiron- 
dack Mountains of New York. 
James Green of Amherst, a junior, 
is studying chemical reactions in 
Pacific Ocean sediments under the 
direction of Professor E. A. Perry. 
This research in geochemistry will 
shed light on the chemical in- 
teractions between ocean waters 
and the sediments which cover the 
ocean bottom. 

Rivers of the United States 
discharge 1.3 million tons of 
sediment per day into the ocean, 
according to the U.S. Geological 
Survey, so sediment-water 
reactions can be very important in 
determining sea water chemistry. 

Robert Suchecki of Nor- 
thampton, a senior, is studying the 
sedimentary origin of the 500 
million-year old Cow Head Group 
in western Newfoundland, under 



the direction of Professor J. F. 
Hubert. This group of rocks has 
recently assumed a central im- 
portance in discussions on the 
motions of the earth's crustal 
plates through time, and on the 
origin of the Appalachian moun- 
tain chain, of which the Cow Head 
group is geologically a part. 

Frederick Adinolfi of Orange, a 
junior, is studying crustal 
evolution in the Adirondack 
Mountains under the direction of 
Professor H. W. Jaffe. This study 
involves the same rock type, 
anorthosite, as the Labrador 
project; the two studies on opposite 
ends of the "anorthosite belt" will 
be complementary, and will fur- 
nish interesting contrasts when the 
students compare notes after the 
field season. 

The NSF-sponsored un- 
dergraduate research program is 
designed to emphasize the value of 
"hands-on" research in the 
training of young scientists, as 
compared to formal course work 
and is designed to set a pattern for 
academic-year independent 
research by undergraduates, 
according to UMass geology 
Professor S. A. Morse, project 
director. UMass is one of ten in- 
stitutions in the country chosen for 
support under the NSF Un- 
dergraduate Research Par- 
ticipation Program. 



AIR COND. 



Storv and Screenplay by 

FEDERICO FELLINI ,nd 

BERNARDINO ZAPPONI 




AMHERSTC^ta 



NOW! 



AMITY ST. 



253-5426 



SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT! 



FELLINIS 
ROMA 



The Fall 
of the Roman Empire 

1931-1972 



MONDAY t TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES ALL SEATS ST 00 




AIK COND. 



Cool Hand Luke 

starring Paul Newman 
Tonight - C.C. Auditorium - FREE 




CALVlNllAe 

KING ST., NORTHAMPTON 



NOW! 



The "STRANGER" 
They'd never forget 
the day he drifted 
into town. 



CUNT 

EASTWOOD 

HIGH PLAINS 

DRIFTER 



- R * 



«* 



MONDAY ft TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS SI 10 




Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show you all the reasons in the world why BRAND YWINE is a 
better place to live. We invite you to compare features and com- 
pare prices. The few minutes you spend with our two beautiful 
models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




'» I •••!. 



••♦It.. »!'•.. It 



;i::r;^m-tr:"n::;,;::^| 

- ■■ -.. •• ,•.,.,<, t« •«•• I I (***.»•* ..».•.* 

" ' »'»•' I , .' U»,M»...» 




Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently "liveable": 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat 
and cooking included in rent. 

Kxlra security features. 

Large, partially enclosed private patios 
and balconies 
Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company. Hartford, 
Connecticut 



One bedroom units from $200 
Two bedroom units from $235 




Brandy wine at Amherst 



mm 



mmmm 



50 Meadow St. 
Amherst 

549-0600 



mm 



mm 



Nursing faculty members from 
throughout New England will 
attend two sessions on maternal 
and child nursing, at UMass next 
academic year. 

The project is a refresher course 
offered members of the New 
England Council of Higher 
Education for Nurses (NECHEN) 
through a grant from the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and 
Welfare. NECHEN is a division of 
the New England Board of Higher 
Education. 

UMass coordinators are Acting 
Dean Lillian R. Goodman and 
Assoc. Prof. Edith G. Walker, both 
of the School of Nursing. The two 
three-day sessions are scheduled 
for October and April. 



UMass News Roundup 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



* • * 



UMass Prof. Bradford Dean 
Crossmon has received the 
Distinguished Member Award 



from the Northeastern 

Agricultural Economics Council. 
Dr. Crossmon teaches marketing 
management courses in the UMass 
College of Food and Natural 
Resources. 

The Council recognized Dr. 
Crossmon's 36 years of "con- 
tinuous devoted service to Nor- 
theastern agriculture." He gave 
leadership to UMass in-service 
graduate training for county 
agricultural agents, teachers of 
vocational agriculture, and leaders 
of farm cooperatives. 

From 1961 to 1963 he was visiting 
scientist and professor at the 
University of Puerto Rico. He was 
the leader of the New England 
Dairy Farm Management Study of 
Harvard University, the six New 
England Land Grant Universities, 
and the Hood Foundation. 

His other activities have in- 
cluded the direction of the land 
scheme study in Malaysia, and 



research consultant work for the 
Virgin Islands. 

Dr. Crossmon, an agricultural 
economist, has been at UMass 
since 1948. 

* • • * 

"Changing Practices in Ad- 
vertising Decision-Making and 
Control," a report of the 
Association of National Ad- 
vertisers, has been prepared by 
Assoc. Prof. Victor P. Buell of 
UMass. 

Dr. Buell is in the marketing 
department of the UMass School of 
Business Administration. The 114- 
page report is an aid to advertisers 
in establishing effective 
organizational and policy bases for 
the development and approval of 
advertising. 

To prepare it, Dr. Buell in- 
terviewed 63 executives at 20 
companies involved with consumer 
goods, and 23 executives of 10 
advertising agencies. He is a 



former marketing vice president 
and the author of "Marketing 
Management in Action." 



» * ♦ * 



Assoc. Prof. George A. Carey of 
the UMass English department has 
received a research grant from the 
American Council of Learned 
Societies. Prof. Carey will study 
Revolutionary War prison songs. 



<IMM(Dmte\ /CONTACTS 
Am T N T, °" wH Lt*s L 
iMMotNcr I I wprues P 
EtMBftfJ ^ll Kwoy 




v/rmlvrst CVtical^Hoppc 

III". North Pleusitnt S|., \nili.rvt 



Tel. gSfj-tttfU. 



Activities This Week 



• On Campus 

July 24 Film: COOL HAND LUKE, A harsh 
southern prison is the setting for this drama 
starring Paul Newman and Arthur Kennedy. 
8:00 p.m., CCA,* 

July 25- August 3 Art Exhibit: CARTOONS 
BY STAN HUNT, Sports cartoonist for the 
Springfield Union, some of these cartoons will 
feature UMASS sports events. SU Gallery, 
open to the public, hours to be announced. 

July 25 Music Hour: JAZZ JAM, artists to 
be announced. 12:00 noon, CC Concourse 

July 2* - Concert: PRESERVATION HALL 
JAZZ BAND, For the seventh consecutive 
year. The Jazz Band returns. 7:00 p.m., Haigis 
Mall (SUB rain location),* 



-Notices 



UMASS OUTING CLUB TRIPS 

Tuesday, July 24, Leisurely hike 
on the Holyoke Range, leaves at 
5:30 p.m. from the CC Bus Circle in 

front of Stockbridge Hall. 

* » » » 

Thursday, July 26, Rattlesnake 
Gutter Cave, leaves at 5:30 p.m. 
from the CC Bus Circle in front of 

Stockbridge Hall. 

* * • * 

Friday, July 27, to Sunday, July 
29, Backpacking on the Ap- 
palachian Trail in Southern 
Berkshire County, you must sign 
up for this trip so the leader can 
purchase food and make other 
arrangements. The sign up sheets 

are on the bulletin board. 

* * * » 

Outing Club Bulletin Board & 
Locker are located across from the 
ticket office in Student Union. 
Equipment rental hours are posted 
on the locker door. 

SUMMER SESSION 
LIBRARY TOURS 

General tours of the new library 
will start from the entrance lobby 
at 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. on the 
remaining Wednesdays of the 
Summer Session. All University 
employees and students will be 
welcome. 

Tours for those interested in 
special subject areas or in par- 
ticular types of library materials 
can also be arranged by ap- 
pointment. Please call the office of 
the Public Services Division, 545- 
0466. 

Classifieds 

FOR SALE 

TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 12)8 
I auto changer, SONY TC 55 port, cassette 
Eico 427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5)71 

t7/3i 

DRIVER WANTED 
To Miami area at the end of July. Call 549 
1532 or 1.783- 2454. 

tf 7/24 

FOR SALE 

For Sale 1967 Chev. Bel Air, gd. cond., 3 
spd, new clutch, $150 Call 549 1332 before 1 

p.m. 

t8/7 

For Sale 1949 Yamaha 305 cc, excellent 
cond , $300 Call 254 8104 after 4 p m. 

1 8/2 

LOST 

Clipboard Held notes on education articles. 
Very important Reward Call 549 0845 

17/24 

' Research notes in library microfilm room 
^on 4/23/73 Please give to library lost anrl 
l found No questions asked 

t7'24 



July 27-29 - Theatre: BELL, BOOK AND 
CANDLE, The Masque Ensemble will be 
performing in an enchanting modern comedy 
of witches and warlocks by the Pulitzer Prize 
winning John Van Druten. 8:00 p.m., Bowker 
Auditorium, ** 

July 30 - Films: THE GENERAL and 
BLOOD AND SAND, If you can remember 
these films you are giving your age away 
because these are silent film classics with 
Buster Keaton and Rudolf Valentino. 800 
p.m., CCA,* 



Music 



MOHAWK TRAIL CONCERTS INC. (at the 
Federated Church on Rte. 2, Charlemont) 
Director, Arnold Black Informal concerts of 
music old and new, Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. 

July 28 A Kaleidoscope of American Music, 
performed by Healy, Rifkin and the Can 
terbury Players. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN CONCERTS, South 
Mountain Association, Box 23, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 01201. (One mile south of Pittsfield, on 
Rtes. 7 and 20) 
July 28at 3 p.m. Tokyo String Quartet 



TANGLEWOOD— BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
CONCERTS (Lenox, Mass. 01240) Included 
Berkshire Festival, Berkshire Music Center, 
Music Center Orchestra, Festival of Con- 
temporary Music, and Tanglewood grounds 
with cafeteria. 

July 27 at 7 p.m.. Weekend Prelude with 
Peter Lagger. 9 p.m., William Steinberg 
conducts Brahms Program, Miriam Fried, 
violinist. 

July 28 at 10:30 a.m.. Open Rehearsal, 8:30 
p.m., William Steinberg conducts Schubert 
and Mahier. James King, soloist. 

July 29 at 2:30 p.m. Rafael Fruhbeck de 
Burgos conducts Beethoven Program with 
Christoph Eschenbach. 

DRUM AND BUGLE CORPS Super Bowl of 
Music, Second Annual Competition of In- 
ternational Championship Sponsored by 
Belchertown State School Friends Association. 
Saturday, August 18 at 7:30 p.m. UMass 
Alumni Satdium. Reservations: George E. 
Como, 229 Whitmore Administration Building, 
UMass, Amherst 0)002, phone 545 2354. (Rain 
date, August )9 at ):30 p.m. If it rains on the 
19th competition will be held indoors at 130 
p.m.) 

PIONEER VALLEY ASSN. EVENTS (at 
locations shown below.) 

For further information, call 584-032). (Ab- 
breviation ESE indicates Eastern States 
Exposition Fairgrounds, West Springfield.) 



Crossword Puzzle 



ACROSS 

1 Cook in oven 
6 Repulse 

11 Sober 

12 Kite 

14 Pronoun 

15 Pertaining to 

the kidneys 

17 Heavenly body 

18 Excavate 
20 Customs 

22 Girl's name 

23 Is mistaken 
25 Harvests 

27 Man's 

nickname 

28 Fur-bearing 

mammals 
30 Simple 
32 Equal 

34 Pertaining to an 
era 

35 Globes 
38 Genus of 

heaths 

4 1 Parent (colloq.) 

42 Hauls 

44 Merit 

45 Goddess of 

healing 
47 Encounters 

49 Man s 

nickname 

50 Dry 

52 Girl's name 

54 Preposition 

55 Pardons 

57 Parti-colored 

59 Thick 

60 Quarrels 



DOWN 

1 Retreat 

2 Hypothetical 

force 

3 Swiss river 

4 Stalk 

5 Singing voice 

6 Let go 

7 Spanish 

article 

8 Dance step 

9 Heraldry: 

grafted 

10 Yeast 

1 1 Takes one's 
part 

13 Barter 

16 Region 

19 Diagram 

21 Steeple 

24 Slumber 

26 Trap 

29 Antitoxin 







Answer to Yesterday 


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31 Poem by 
Homer 
33 Relinquishment 

35 Lance 

36 Coupled 

37 Winter vehicle 

39 Boxes 

40 Pester 
43 Stalks 



46 Hoarfrost 
48 Weak food 
51 Noise 
53 Greek letter 
56 Tensile 

strength 

(abbr.) 
58 Army officer 

(abbr.) 





1 


2 


3 


4 


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82 


7 


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vv. 


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* V * « * 



' 



Page •—University of Massachusetts— The Critr 



IM Swim Meet Tomorrow 



J* v; 






After last week's cross country races won by John Windyke and Phyllis 
Olrich, this Wednesday's Intramural Swimming meet should be a 
refreshing change in more ways than one. 

The meet, which will be held at 6:00 p.m. in the Boy den Pool, will in- 
clude individual events, relays and diving events for both men and 
women. Entries will be accepted at the meet, with a limit of three per 
person. Questions should be posed at the IM Office or by calling 545-2801 
or 545-2693. 

The cross country run attracted eleven male entries and two female 
entries. Windyke's and Olrich's respective winning times of 8:32.8 and 
6:07.7 were very good for a rather warm evening. 



»*• 






«— ..-•. 





The UMass 1972-73 Co-Recreational swim meet. 



Next week, August 1, the third all comers meet will be a bicycle race 
that will be run around the Stadium road. There will be a race for both 
men and women. 

So far there have been few forfeits in Softball and volleyball, but per- 
sons in the individual sports should avoid postponing their matches as the 
going could get rather congested in the next few weeks. 

Bike Races To Be Held 

The Third annual bicycle races will be held in conjunction with the 
Adams Summer Festival. The races will begin August 5 at 12 p.m. with a 
30-mile marathon for all ages and classifications. A $3.00 dollar entry fee 
will be charged for the marathon race only, helmets are mandatory for 
the marathon only. 

At 1:15 p.m. the sprint races will begin. The sprints consists of 1-1/2 
mile, with 15 age and bike classifications. Two features will be a tricycle 
race and a single speed Tandem race. 

Entry blanks can be obtained by contacting Joseph Doyle, Hoosac 
Valley High School, Adams, Mass. 01220. 



Standings As Of 7/20 



MEN'S SOFTBALL 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

1. Bio Psych 



No longer in 



4-0 
3-1 
3-1 
2-2 
2-2 
2-2 
1-3 
1-3 
1-3 
the 



2. Big Sticks 

3. Misfits 

4. Pipefitters 

5. Swine 

6. Civil 

7. NAPC 

8. Batmen 

9. Watergate 
10. PROFS 
league. 

Scheduled opponents will win-by- 
forfeit. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

1 . Plumbers 

2. Ashcan 
3.P.S.E. 

4. Education 

5. Dishrags 

6. Immorril 

7. Shamrocks 

8. Ringers 

9. Sissies 
10 CCEBS 

CO-REC SOFTBALL 

1. Misfits 

2. Upward Bound 

3. Immorril 

4. Swine 



CO-REC VOLLEYBALL 

1. Bound Upward 2-1 

2. Upward Bound 2-1 

3. No Team 1-2 

4. CCEBS 1-2 

MEN'S VOLLEYBALL 

1. Big Sticks 3-0 

2. CCEBS 2-1 

3. Galahad 1-1 

4. P.S.E. 1-2 




RACE 


AGE 


CLASSIFICATION 


TIME 


Master Marathon 


All 


All 




12:00P.M. 


Boys & Girls 


4-6 


tricycle (100 yds.) 


1:15P.M. 


Boys 


6-9 


1 speed 




1:30P.M. 


Girls 


6-9 


1 speed 




1:45P.M. 


Boys 


10-13 


1 speed & 3 


speed 


2:00P.M. 


Girls 


10-13 


1 speed & 3 


speed 


2:10P.M. 


Boys 


10-13 


5-10 speed 




2:20P.M. 


Girls 


10-13 


5-10 speed 




2:30P.M. 


Boys 


13-17 


3 speed 




2:40 P.M. 


Girls 


13-17 


3 speed 




2:50P.M. 


Boys 


13-17 


5-10 speed 




3:00 P.M.' 


Girls 


13-17 


5-10 speed 




3:10P.M. 


Men 


18-25 


5-10 speed 




3:20P.M. 


Women 


18-25 


5-10 speed 




3:30P.M. 


Men 


26-up 


multi speed 




3:40 P.M. 


Women 


26-up 


multi speed 




3:50 P.M. 


Tandem 


All 


1 speed 




4:00P.M. 






Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

MON.-SAT. 10:00-8:00 t-j — i co , -. -, 

THURS.&FRl. til 9:00 telephone 586-3727 

SALE 

USED JEANS 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 
WORK SHIRTS 2for»2 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 

USED VESTS 




2 for $ 6 

75« 

2 for »3 




ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS '7« •»«•»»« 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 

our d*U 





BOOGIE&BLUES EVENT 

BLUE WALL 







WED • THURS • FRI 

9:00-1:00 



"Superbowl* August 18th 



The Hurricanes Drum and Bugle Corp, winner of 
every major world title offered senior corps, will 
offer a touch of nostalgia at the Superbowl of Music 
Saturday, August 18, in Amherst. 

Portions of Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" will be 
used in drum and bugle competition for the first time 
as the Hurricanes from Shelton, Connecticut, com- 
pete in the second annual Superbowl of Music in 
Alumni Stadium at the University of Massachusetts. 

Other competitors will be: Les Diploma tes from 
Quebec City, Canada ; The Skyliners from New York 
City, defending Superbowl champions; the 
Caballeros of Hawthorne, N.J., national champions; 
The Sunrisers from Long Island; and the Matadors 
from Providence, R.I. 

The Superbowl will begin at 7:30 p.m. August 18, in 
the 20,000-seat Alumni Stadium of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst. The sponsoring 
organization, the Belchertown State School Friends 
Association, a group dedicated to the improvement of 
the lives of the mentally retarded residents at 
Belchertown, will apply the proceeds after expenses 
to help humanize the environment of the residents at 
Belchertown. Advance reservations may be made 



with George Como, 229 Whitmore, UMass, Amherst, 
Mass. 01002. In case of rain August 18, the program 
will be the following day, Sunday, at 1 :30 p.m. 

The Hurricanes production number for the 
Superbowl will be a rhythmic arrangement of 
"Shaft" ala Maynard Ferguson. 

The subtle exit of "Hand 'em High" featuring a 
huge pinwheel (commonly referred to as a "suicide 
wheel") at the fifty-yard line executed by the entire 
horn line culminates into the traditional strains of 
"The Magnificent Seven," the theme song 
synonymous with the Connecticut Hurricane. 

Also on the Hurricanes program is a medley of 
circus music, including "Entry of the Gladiators," 
"Ballyhoo March," "Barnum & Bailey's Greatest," 
and "Billboard March," all creating the Hurricanes' 
"Greatest Show on Earth," a tribute to showman, P. 
T. Barnum. 

Last year's color presentation, "Journey for 
Peace" has been retained and will again feature the 
music of the world's five major powers- America, 
Great Britain, Russia, France and China-mingled 
with "Impossible Dream," topped by a counter- 
melody of "What the World Needs Now is Love." 





July 26, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 10 



I 



Zoe Best is a woman; Zoe Best is a poet; Her words speak of the 
agonizing struggles of women and men of Latin America and the 
United States, of the issue of war and of poverty, and of the world 
through the eyes of a very unique woman. Zoe Best, above, Irma 
McLaurin and Bill Hasson will be reading from their works in the 
outdoor cafe area of the Coffee Shop on Wednesday. Aug. 1 at 2 p.m. 
In case of rain, the poetry reading will take place in the Music 
Listening Room on the Campus Center Concourse. At 1 p.m. Jaime 
Santiago and his Latin American singers will sing songs of Latin 
America and the Caribbean with explanations in English by WFCR 
radio commentator, Julio Torres. 



Preservation Hall Band Here Tonight 



When the Preservation Hall Jazz Band arrives here for 
their concert on Thursday, July 26 at Haigis Mall, UMass, 
they will play New Orleans Jazz. The music is the root of all 
that we now know as jazz, plus the sound that changed the 
orchestras and the playing styles for all of our popular 
music, and has influenced many classical composers. 
Fine... but what is the music that will be heard here? 

It is easy to say what New Orleans Jazz isn't, but what it is 
to an audience is very subjective, what it is to a musician is 
equally personal. The sources for New Orleans Jazz have 
been explored many times. 

There are labels. You can call it Blues, and be right, 
Ragtime and be right sometimes. You can hear the marches 
of funeral parades and of John Phillip Sousa. You can hear 
the spirituals of Pineywoods churches in Louisiana and the 
songs of gospel quartets. The music of the Creole people in 
New Orleans with their quadrilles and even their minuets 
and their other special music is there. 

New Orleans Jazz is not slick and arranged on paper to be 
played the same each time. It is not Dixieland and it is not 
the vaudeville and night club brand of vaudeville music. It is 
not straw hats and funny jackets and cheap tricks. 

When you finally reach New Orleans Music, it is five or 
seven or sometimes a few more men who are playing a 
tradition, and still reaching into a deep well of creative 
genius to improvise. The trumpet plays the melody, the 
clarinet plays the counter melody, the trombone plays the 
harmony, the piano plays the chords on which it is all based 
and the rhythm section keeps everyone inside the limits ol 
the tempo... and then suddenly the melody moves to a dif 
ferent instrument and that player improvises and change: 
everything and the excitement builds and your spirits soai 
along with the music and the happy sounds or the sad sound* 
and you know you are listening to New Orleans Music. 

On another level you are hearing men who heard Freddit 
Keppard or Buddy Bolden or King Oliver or Johnny Dodds 
or Kid Ory or Jelly Roll Morton or Baby Dodds play thai 
melody and that change for the first time 55 years ago and 
you are hearing men who have played it for that long and 
have answered the demands of audiences at home in the 
Louisiana Parishes for that many years and they are 
playing their music. 

So New Orleans Music doesn't submit to the confines of 
words very well. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band plays it 
the way it was played by these same historical people when 
they created jazz. They play it with as much vigor and joy as 
they did then. Never mind that each member of the band is 
more than 60 years young now. They know what New 
Orleans Music is.... and they'll be here to play it for you in a 
concert. The music won't die, they are teaching other young 
men in Preservation Hall. The music will never be just the 
same when these creators, who have stayed as young as 
their music have left the stage for the last time... for they 
were there when it happened and their technique and their 
souls have never forgotten how to make it happen 
again... night after night... on the road, in a dance or at 
Preservation Hall. 

Whatever New Orleans Jazz is, it will be on stage here. 
The audience will hear something that has never been heard 
before, and never will be heard again, just as the audience 
on the next night will hear a unique concert... everyone is 
different because the musicians, all now in their 60's, 70's or 
even 80's play an improvised music. It is not just an 
historical experience to hear the Preservation Hall Jazz 
(Continued on Page 6) 




The Preservation Hall Band 



Billie Goodson Pierce was born in Florida in 1907, came 
from a family of piano-vocalists. When she was 15, she went 
on tour as accompanist to the legendary Bessie Smith. It 
was here that Billie learned her own vocal style, which has 
brought her to the ranks of the greatest blues singers in the 
world. She married DeDe in 1935. 

"DeDe" Joseph La Croix Pierce was born in New Orleans in 
1904. He practically grew up with his trumpet which he first 
studied with Professor Chaligny. His horn explores every 
reach of emotion from the wildest sorrow to serene 
resignation and dioysian joy. Of Creole descent, he was 
brickmason by day, cornetist by night until blinded by 
glaucoma. His best songs are in Gombo, Negro-French 
dialect of Louisiana. 

"Big Jim" Robinson was born in Deer Range, Louisiana in 
1890. He began to play the trombone during World War I with 
an Army band in France. In the 1920's he played with New 
Orleans famous Sam Morgan jazz band. He later played 



with Bunk Johnson and George Lewis. 
Willie Humphrey was born in New Orleans in 1901, and 
learned to play the clarinet from his father. His equally 
famous brother, Percy, is one of the Crescent City's best 
trumpeters. He has played with the Excelsior Brass Band, 
King Oliver, in Story ville and with Sweet Emma, and now is 
a regular in the Pierce band. 

Josiah "Cie" Frazier was born in New Orleans in 1904 and is 
considered the finest drummer to come out of the city since 
the late Baby Dodds. He, too, played for Bessie Smith and 
later toured extensively in the Mississippi River boats. 

Allan Jaffe, who often sits with the band on tuba, is the 
founder of Preservation Hall in New Orleans. Along with his 
wife Sandra, Jaffe set out in 1961 to rejuvenate the real New 
Orleans jazz and to give both consistent work and proper 
praise to the great musicians who are part of this American 
treasure. 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier 



The Ortor is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Mike Ugolini 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Pa«e 3 






Kditor-in -Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

(ootributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Cindy Rogers 

Steve Ruggles 




Sam was hoping to make it to the 
All-Star game, but his batting 
average wasn't good enough. But 
he still feels that there's plenty of 
time to have a ball with the Crier. 
Try it - Room 402 Student Union. 



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Crier Quiz 








% % 



» \ 



\V V % • . 



'^1 



Here's today's Mystery Woman, a figure from the 
world of sports. The hint is that she's making a lot of 
money with her figure, but not in the conventional 
sense (you can call us a lot of things, but we aren't 
sexist here.) Remember, first person to make it to 
402 Student Union and guess who Mystery Woman is 
gets his/her picture in the Crier Tuesday. Hurry! 




Here's Tuesday's contest win- 
ner, Richard McCarthy of 17 Aqua 
Vita Road, Hadley. Being a 
theatre-art major, he immediately 
recognized Tuesday's Mystery 
Woman as Deep Throat star Linda 
Lovelace. Very perceptive, 
Richard. Congratulations. 



Crime In Congress 



With everything that's happening to this country, it 
seems ludicrous that our Congress acts in such a 
sluggish manner if it acts at all. We watch our cities 
decay, migrant farmers starve, inflation that won't 
quit, a recession on the way, and there seems to be no 
end in sight (at least not by way of Congress) . 

But, it is not surprising to see Congress most 
energetic in those matters that mean profits, because 
to a great many men in Congress making legislation 
and making profits mean the same thing. 

There are ninety-seven bankers in the House, and 
at least a dozen of them are on the House Banking 
Committee, which writes legislation relating to these 
members investments and outside livelihood (How 
many banking executives sit on the Senate Banking 
Committee is uncertain because senators have so far 
successfully fought off all efforts to make them 
publicly acknowledge their business ties.) 

It is commonplace for congressmen owning oil and 
gas stock to vote in favor of that industry on tax 
legislation and for congressmen owning stock in the 
broadcast industry to vote for bills that protect its 
income (i.e. legislation aimed at salvaging cigarette 
commercials for T.V.) 

Senator Russell Long of Louisiana, chairmen of the 
Senate Finance Committee, which has been a citadel 
guarding the oil depletion allowance, is a millionaire 
from his oil holdings. 

Except for defense industrialists, no group of 
businessmen is so protected by the American tax- 
payers as those big farmers who call themselves 
"agribusinessmen". It is for them that the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture is funded by Congress. While 
about 150,000 non-competitive small farmers are 
forced to sell out each year, the agribusinessmen who 
are taking over grow wealthy from federal price 
supports and for subsidies for not planting certain 
crops (the euphemism is "acreage division"). 

There are less than half as many farmers today as 
there were in 1940, but the Department of 
Agriculture's budget has quadrupled, largely as a 
result of fatter subsidies. Little of this is shared by the 
14 million rural poor ; it goes to outfits like the James 
G. Boswell farm corporation in California, which has 
received as much as $4.4 million in a single year from 
the federal government. 

In 1970, nine such corporate farmers were paid 
more than $1 million; twenty-three got subsidies of 
$500,000 or more. That was the year Congress passed 
a law that was supposed to limit each individual 
farmer to no more than $55,000 in subsidies; but some 
of our "leading" Americans, like Senator James O. 
Eastland and John Wayne (who has the balls to 
publicly oppose welfare), simply split up their farm 
holdings among family and friends, and the new law 
saved not a penny. One of the more interesting free 
enterprisers standinginline for a handout was Ken- 
neth Frick, the very man who administered the 
Agriculture Department's farm subsidy program; he 
and his brother stood to earn $110,000. 

Of the 35 members of the House Agriculture 
Committee, twenty are from cotton states; on the 
Senate Committee, 1 

Of the 35 members of the House Agriculture 



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1$c*****************************$ 

Letters Policy 



The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



Committee, twenty are from cotton states; on the 
Senate Agriculture Committee, eight of the fifteen 
members are. W. R. Poage, who owns two farms in 
Texas is chairmen of the House group; Texas gets 
the largest handout of all ~ nearly one-third of the 
total paid to the nation's cotton farmers. Texas also 
gets the fifth largest handout for feed grains; Poage 
raises feed grains. 

The chairman of the Senate farm group is Allen 
Ellender of Louisiana. Among several benefits from 
the federal farm programs, Louisiana receives 
millions under the Sugar Act Program - a program 
whose effect, if not goal, is to keep sugar prices high 
in the grocery store. Ellender has always been looked 
upon as a stout friend of the sugar lobby, and it was 
perhaps because of this regard that he received 
certain favors in return, such as the reportedly 
preferential prices on land sold to him by a sugar 
company in Louisiana. The personal involvement of 
Ellender in farm affairs, is trivial compared to that of 
James O. Eastland, the third ranking member of the 
Senate committee. Eastland owns a 5000 acre 
plantation in Mississippi, for which he receives from 
the government more than $250,000 in subsidies. 

Of the 535 men and women in Congress, about 300 
are attorneys; some have found extra profit from 
being both a congressmen and an attorney. The late 
Senate Republican leader Everett Dirksen was in a 
Peoria law firm employed by major oil companies, 
paper companies, bottling compames, insurance 
companies, steel companies, and a score of other 
industries. He often advocated legislation to help 
*'.... i The fact that two of Dirksen's political friends 
m-,:n on the Federal Power Commission may have 
helped Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line decide to 
become a client of Dirksen's law firm, since the FPC 
regulates the pipelines. 

Senator John McClellan, chairmen of the Per- 
manent Investigating Sub-committee, once held a 
brief-very brief-investigation into an oil lobbying 
scandal but he cut it off before involving such clients 
of his Little Rock Law firm as Standard Oil, Seaboard 
Oil, Carter Oil, and Tidewater Oil companies. Mc- 
Clellan has, with a great deal of fanfare, investigated 
bank scandals; he has been quieter about the fact his 
law firm opposed the chartering of banks that would 
compete with the two that he holds stock in. 
Congressman Emanuel Celler of New York main- 
tains an active law office whose income is probably 
not hurt by the fact that he is chairman of the House 
Judiciary Committee. 

The primary effect of the friendships and the 
overlapping of interests among members of Congress 
and industry is that nothing is done. What has been 
mentioned here does not include the lobbying that is 
done in Washington. That's a whole 'nother story. 

And the truth is that most industries do not send 
their lobbyists to Washington to seek profitable 
legislation; they send them there to block legislation 
that might control or cost them more in taxes. The 
major goal of the Washington lobby is not to pass 
legislation but to maintain the status quo (i.e. in the 
case of Dita Beard and ITT). And from all the ap- 
pearances, they are quite successful. 



What 



Preservation Hall is located just 
where it ought to be, although it 
was originally a happy accident. It 
has just the proper history in its 
charming old walls, and it is 
performing a very important 
function in present day artistic 
history. 

Preservation Hall is at 726 St. 
Peter Street in New Orleans, La. 
That puts it right at the entrance to 
the French Quarter, and very near 
Basin and Canal Streets where 
Jazz was born. To it come the 
musicians in New Orleans who 
walked by it in their youth when 
jazz music was an infant. After 
dark when the New Orleans Jazz 
starts, the visitors are music 
lovers from everywhere in the 
world who know that each night at 
the Hall is an historical moment. 

The building was originally a 
private home, built about 1750. It is 
known that it was a tavern during 
the U.S. occupation after the War 
of 1812. In recent years it has been 
occupied by many creative people, 
even including Erie Stanley 
Gardner. In 1952 it became an art 
gallery, called the Associated Arts 
Studio and the proprietor invited 
original musicians to come in and 
"rehearse" with a freewill offering 
at the door for his friends who 
came to listen. 

Soon the music took over the 
building and the art gallery moved 
next door with a studio upstairs 
where the Noel Rockmore 
Preservation Hall portraits were 
done. A club was formed and at- 
tendance at the "rehearsals" was 
increased. 

The neighbors didn't always like 
this upstart in the area. In fact, for 



awhile members of the band, black 
and white alike, spent some very 
unpleasant hours before less-than- 
sympathetic magistrates on the 
joint counts of disturbing the peace 
and violation of white supremacy. 

In 1961 the club, like almost all 
jazz clubs, began to have its 
frictions. It was dissolved and 
Sandra and Allan Jaffe took it over 
to operate as a business. That was 
the beginning of the chance to 
bring this great music, played by 
its originators, to the hearts of 
audiences every night and later to 
all of the United States, to Europe 
and to the Orient. 

Today Preservation Hall is 
maintained and operated just as it 
was in the beginning. Benches and 
kitchen chairs accommodate about 
half of the nightly audience. Some 
of the floor is loose and the front is 
off the old upright piano. Sandra 
Jaffe still keeps the historic wicker 
basket at the front door for the 
donation which pays union scale to 
the musicians at work. It is clean 
and swept, but the charm of 
Preservation Hall remains. The 
atmosphere of New Orleans is not 
violated by chrome and fancy 
lighting and rushing.waiters. It is a 
place to hear the great people play 
their great music. 

Preservation Hall is a school, 
too. Young musicians come from 
Japan and Europe as well as 
America to learn how to play New 
Orleans Music. To shed the 
misunderstandings that have 
grown as jazz was made com- 
mercial, and so to preserve the 
music into the future as it should be 
preserved. There is nothing formal 
about the school, it wouldn't 



provide the link if it were struc- 
tured. 

Preservation Hall is a state of 
mind for many as well. The state of 
mind is happy because the music is 
happy and the setting is right. 
There are no cults and factions. 
The musicians are past that now, 
they are secure in the tradition and 
their own consumate skills. The 
musicians are the leaders, the 
Jaffes steer the ship and Preser- 
vation Hall becomes the true 
Preservation of what might 
pretentiously be called an "art 
form". 

If you would like to have a 
cheerful argument, just drop in at 
726 St. Peter any time and an- 
nounce that one of your favorites is 
the greatest band or that an in- 
dividual performer is the 'best'. 
The loyalties are there and you can 
be surrounded by adherants to 
every band and loyalists for every 
performer 

The vitaiit 1 of jazz infects all of 
the people, musicians and listeners 
alike, at the Hall. But the total 
result inspires everyone. 

One of the great Preservation 
Hall bands will be here on Thur- 
sday, July 26 at 7 p.m. on Haigis 
Mall in front of the Whitmore 
Administration Building at the 
University of Massachusetts (In 
case of rain seats will be available 
to summer students first at the 
Student Union Ballroom. Ad- 
mission is free and open to the 
public). 

You might well find them hap- 
pily at work in Preservation Hall 
when this tour is over but for now 
they have brought the sunshine and 
the smiles of New Orleans at the 
beginning of Jazz to a concert here. 



Bell, Book, And Candle Starts Tomorrow 




What happens when an unsuspecting publisher 
enters a world of mysticism and surprise? It's 
MAGIC! It's ENCHANTMENT! It will leave you 
SPELLBOUND! It's John Van Druten's charming 
romance of mischievous witches and warlocks, 
BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE at Bowker Auditorium 
on the U. Mass. campus, July 27-29 and Aug. 2-4 at 
8:00 p.m. Van Druten is the Pulitzer Prize winning 
playwright of I AM A CAMERA from which 
CABARET was adapted. Presented by the Masque 
Ensemble and sponsored by the Summer Activities 
Committee, BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE will 
abound with spectacular witchcraft and occult 
shenanigans. Set in the mad, mod world of the late 
sixties, the play combines flower power and sum- 
moning power in a beguiling combination. 

BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE is being directed by 
Bonnie Bishoff . The 1973 Summer Season is Bonnie's 
third with the Masque. The Summer '71 Season was 



highlighted by Bonnie's performance of Meg in 
Harold Pinter's THE BIRTHDAY PARTY. Bonnie 
compiled and directed BONNERE AND BUXOM and 
MARVELS OF THE OLD WEST and her acting 
credits include major roles in THE GLASS 
MENAGERIE, MAJOR BARBARA, CANTERBURY 
TALES and LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT 
as well as tours with the Everyman Players. 

The cast for BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE includes 
Marcy Ertel, Michelle Faith, Floyd Bailey, John 
Countryman and Alan Kurtz. The set design, com- 
plete with magical special effects, is being provided 
by Ray Nichols. Ruth Seligman is designing the 
appropriately bewitching costumes. 

Tickets for BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE are 
available at R.S.O. on the second floor of the Student 
Union or by calling 545-2351. Students with a U.Mass. 
I.D. will be admitted free; admission for the general 
public will be $1.50. 



Marcy Ertel, John Countryman, and Michelle Faith rehearse a 
scene from John Van Druten's Bell, Book and Candle, a romantic 
comedy opening this week at the University of Massachusetts. The 
play, offered as a part of the Summer season of the Masque En- 
semble, will be performed in Bowker Auditorium on July 27, 28, and 
29 and August 2, 3 and 4 at 8:00 p.m. Admission is free to Summer 
school students and $1.50 for members of the community. Reser- 
vations can be made by calling 545-2351 or by coming by the RSO 
office on the second floor of the Student Union. Tickets will also be 
available at the door. 

Castro Revolts 

Today In History 



Today is Tuesday, July 26, the 
207th day of 1973. There are 168 
days left in the yar. 
Today's highlight in history: 
On this date in 1953, Fidel Castro 
began a revolt in Cuba, attacking 
an army barracks at Santiago. 
On this date- 
In 1759, the French abandoned 
Ft. Ticonderoga to the British in 
the French and Indian War. 

In 1775, the Continental Congress 
established a Post Office Depart- 
ment, with Benjamin Franklin as 
the first postmaster general. 



CRIER 

News 
Hotline 

545-0617 



In 1847, Liberia was declared a 
republic, making it the only 
sovereign black nation in Africa. 

In 1944, in World War II, German 
V2 rocket bombs Ijit targets in 
England for the first time. 

In 1952, Argentina's first lady, 
Eva Peron, died. 

In 1956, Egypt nationalized the 
Suez Canal. 

Ten years ago: A massive 
earthquake devastated the city of 
Skoplje in Yugoslavia, causing 
more than 1,000 fatalities. 

Five years ago: Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy removed himself from 
consideration as a Democratic 
vice-presidential candidate in the 
1968 election. 

One year ago: Premier Gold 
Meir of Israel proposed peace talks 
with Egypt, now that Egyptians 
had ordered Soviet military ad- 
visors to return home. 

Today's birthdays: Conductor 
Donald Voorhees is 70. Writer Alice 
Winchester is 66. 

Thought for today : Culture is the 
ability to recognize the best in 
others-Matthew Arnold, English 
poet and critic, 1822-1888. 




MCOJEEIM 




BULLITT 

Mon. July 30 - 7, 9, and 11 
Campus Center Auditorium 75' 



// 's The Buildings 



Don't Blame The Wind 



BOSTON -When skirts fly up and 
umbrellas pop inside out, most 
people blame the wind. But the real 
culprits, says a Boston physicist, 
are often the buildings around us. 
In fact, T. Ian McLaren says 
walking city sidewalks can be 
hazardous to your health if ar- 
chitects and developers fail to 
consider air currents and wind 
velocity when they build 
skyscrapers and downtown 
complexes. 

McLaren, of the weather 
dynamics division of Mt. Auburn 
Research Associates, Inc. of 
Newton, said in an interview that 
pedestrians have literally been 
blown off their feet by swirling air 
masses that form at the bases of 
some buildings. 

"These air masses also trap 
vehicular traffic and nearby 
building exhaust fumes, adding to 
already considerable urban en- 
vironmental problems," he said. 
Wind velocity, direction and 
formations play an important part 
in McLaren's work as a consultant 
to architects and developers. 

Rapidly moving air striking the 
top of a building is deflected 
downward and forms a whirlpool- 
like mass, he said. 

Depending on the velocity of the 
wind on a given day, the height of 
the structure it hits and the efforts 
that have been made to control the 
air flow, the street level wind 

Rainbow Fest Coming 

The Rainbow Festival is a 
multiarts celebration. Films, such 
as the Chaplin's The Tramp and 
Greta Garbo's Mata Hari will be 
shown continuously in the Campus 
Center Auditorium. A Fascinating 
display of arts and crafts 
(weavers, sculptors, potters, 
silversmiths, etc.) will take place 
along the Campus Center Con- 
course. Each crafts person will 
demonstrate and explain their 
work. In the Music Listening Room 
at 11 African drum makers from 
New York City will show the 
process through which a drum is 
developed. At 12 noon the 
University of Massachusetts Mr. 
Walter Chesnut will give a horn 
demonstration. The afternoon 
brings Jaime Santiago and his fine 
Latin American singers followed 
by the poets Zoe Vest, Irma Lewis 
and Bill Hasson reading from their 
works. Later in the day on the 
Campus Center Hotel (3rd Level) 
patio the African Rhythms and 
Dance of Omo Lucumi will glorify 
the day with African Percussion. 
To round off the Rainbow Festival 
John Hartford, Bill Staines and 
Mathew and Peter will provide us 
with a folk concert on Metawampe 
Lawn to bring an end to our 
Festival. All events are free and 
open to the public. 



factor can range from minimal to 
annoying to dangerous, McLaren 

said. 

At the base of a building, wind 
velocity of less than 10 mph 
produces no problems; velocity of 
10-20 mph can turn umbrellas 
inside out and blow hats off heads, 
and velocity of more than 20 mph 
can throw a 200-pound man into the 
side of a building or onto the 
ground, he said. 

In addition, wind velocity in a 
cold day produces a "chill factor" 
that can lower the temperature as 
much as 20 degrees on a city street. 
McLaren's job is to advise ar- 
chitects and developers of the best 
way to build with minimal wind 
effects or to find solutions to wind 
problems at existing structures. 
"Sometimes a canopy can be 
added or a wall built in a certain 
area or another building positioned 
near an existing building to 
alleviate poor wind conditions," he 
said. 

In Hartford, Conn., McLaren 
solved the problem for a downtown 
complex that wanted to establish 
an open-air restaurant between 
buildings. He showed a Buffalo, 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 



Rev. Richard 
Pastor 



E. 



Koenig, 
549-0322 



N.Y., architect how to lay out a 
two-mile square university 
campus so that fumes and par- 
ticles from chemistry labs 
wouldn't be trapped in the ground- 
level air. 

McLaren and three other 
scientists work in a small 
laboratory where they have built a 
32-foot-long slow speed wind tunnel 
to test architects' models. 

In connection with his work, 
McLaren notes that Chicago's 
fame as the "Windy City" is a bit 
exaggerated. Based on National 
Weather Service average wind 
velocity records, Oklahoma City, 
Okla., is No. 1 at 13.4 miles per 
hour, followed by Great Falls, 
Mont., at 13.3 and Boston with 13. 
Chicago comes in a wheezing 16th 
at an average 10.2 mph. 



Weather 
(9) 2564714 



Outing Club Events 



Today, Rattlesnake Gutter Cave, 
leaves at 5:30 p.m. from the CC 
Bus Circle in front of Stockbridge 
Hall. 



purchase food and make other 
arrangements. The sign up sheets 
are on the bulletin board. 



* • • * 



• » » » 



Friday, July 27, to Sunday, July 
29, Backpacking on the Ap- 
palachian Trail in Southern 
Berkshire County, you must sign 
ud for this trip so the leader can 



Outing Club Bulletin Board & 
Locker are located across from the 
ticket office in Student Union. 
Equipment rental hours are posted 
on the locker door. 





Old 
Weird Harolds 




NEW & USED CLOTHES 

BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

Telephone 586-3727 



MOM.-SAT. 10:00-8100 
THU0S. t Ml. Til 0:00 




SALE 




2 for $ 3 



USED JEANS 

USED FLANNEtS & BLUE 
WORK SHIRTS 2 for *2 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 2 for $ 6 



75* 

2 for *3 




USED VESTS 
ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS $ 7« »*»•»»« 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 

UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 





Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Inquiring Crier 



What Do You Think Of UMass In The Summer? 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page $ 



Who's That? ... I Don't Know 




Photos by 
Gib Fullerton 



Interviews by 
Steve Tripoli 



Tom Krol, 78 Gray St., Amherst— 
"Summer's OK. I really like summer here. There's 
really not much to say. I guess I ought to think of 
something witty. The bars aren't crowded." 






Kathy Wise, 103B Brittany Manor, Amherst— 
"Great. Much better than the regular year. Not too 
many people." 



Dog, Student Union— 
"No Comment." 



Dave Carlson, Montague — 
"That's too nebulous a question." 




Monty Hubert, Montague — 

"It's quieter, there's not as many vectors coming in 

at the same time." 






This is an identification contest and all you have to do is correctly give the names 
of two groups and two solo performers pictured here. If you should be the first, 
you've wort a copy of Leon Russell's new album, Leon Live. 

Submit your entry, by mail only, to the Crier, Student Union, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. Entries must be postmarked no later than Monday, July 
30. 





The Sopor Story 



By CHARLES PERRY 

Said Correspondent X: 

"It's utterly fantastic. Quaalude made me 
feel friendly, open and receptive. In fact, it 
made me feel permanently receptive. I got 
into things I'd never gotten into before and 
they're still with me." 

Said Correspondent Y: 

"Other downs bring me too down. I just 
fall out, so I have to fight them and by the 
time I stop fighting, I'm not high any more. 
Quaalude calms me down and makes me 
mellow and loose. I want to dance, talk, 
dance, cook; I can even drive on it. And I 
can make love on it very nicely. But I don't 
lose control at all and there's no hangover; 
I'm always alert the next morning." 

Both quotes are from the spring of 1971, 
when methaqualone— 2-Methyl-3-ortho- 
tolyl-4-quinazolone, known commercially as 
Quaalude, Sopor, Mandrax, Optimil and 
Parest, among other names— was beginning 
its fantastic rise in popularity. It seemed to 
be what a lot of people were looking for: A 
downer without drawbacks. It wasn't, 
though. 

Methaqualone is classed as a central 
nervous system depressant, a sedative- 
hypnotic. It's prescribed as a sedative and a 
sleeping pill. If you don't follow doctor's 
orders, though, and take a sleeping dose 
while you're actually running around doing 
things, you feel high. Specifically: relaxed 
to the drooping point, comfortable (the pain 
threshold is higher), confident, and con 
sequently uninhibited, communicative and 
generous. 



You'll also be unable to coordinate your 
muscles very well, or tell where your limbs 
exactly are, when undertaking tricky tasks 
such as walking; you'll understand the 
meaning of the term "wallbanger." Your 
speech will be slurred. Your eyes may play 
ping-pong a little in their sockets. But none 
of this will matter much to you. People who 
have taken enough quacks can fall down 
flights of stairs and not feel the bruises until 
the next day. 

On higher doses the effects are more 
pronounced. Coordination becomes very 
difficult due to muscular tremors, which it 
has been suspected are actually symptoms 
of partial anaesthesia of the muscles. An 
acute overdose of 2.4 grams (say, eight 300 
mg tabs) can result in coma and con- 
vulsions. Death has followed a dose of as low 
as 8 grams. A dose higher than the sleeping 
dose can depress tracheo-bronchial reflexes 
to a dangerous degree-so that if you were to 
vomit in your sleep, you could choke to 
death, Jimi Hendrix style. Overdose and 
fatal dose levels are much lower if in ad- 
dition to methaqualone you've taken any 
other downs, such as barbiturates or 
phenobarbs-or alcohol. Rock & roll has 
already seen its first methaqualone OD: 
Danny Whitten, formerly of Crazy Horse. 

Who would want to take such high 
dosages? Suicides, for one. There were a 
number of methaqualone suicides in Ger- 
many when the drug was available without 
prescription. Who else? People who are so 
stoned they forget how many they've taken 
And finally, although it would take a real 



handful of pills to kill someone who had 
developed tolerance after long, heavy use, 
the possibility always lurks in a 
wallbanger's future. Physical tolerance, the 
danger level, rises more slowly than 
psychological tolerance, the amount it takes 
to get you high. The levels tend inexorably to 
get closer and closer. 

And yes, Quaaludes are addicting, as 
addicting as barbiturates or any other 
medicine-chest high, with the same evil 
withdrawal symptoms. 

"Qualitatively and quantitatively," says 
Dr. George Gay, Director of Clinical Ac- 
tivities at the Haight-Ashbury Mecical 
Clinic, "there is no discernible difference 
between Quaalude or Sopor and reds, the 
barbiturates. Quaalude has all the bad 
qualities of barbs. It's a respiratory 
depressant, and when it's taken in com- 
bination with other downs or alcohol there is 
an additive effect. It can totally suppress 
breathing. 

"And although the drug companies and 
the Physicians' Desk Reference don't 
acknowledge this, it is addicting. Ten 
Quaaludes a day for a month is enough to 
give you a physical habit, such that if ybu 
stop flat, cold turkey, you will exhibit the 
prodrome to convulsions, just like a bar- 
biturate addict: sweating, disturbed sleep 
and nightmares, white-knuckled tension. 
Methaqualone has only been popular for a 
relatively short time, and I have no doubt 
that soon we'll be seeing addicts with heavy 
enough habits that they actually will go into 
convulsions." 



The dangers of addiction and poisoning 
have been recognized in other countries, 
among them Britain, where methaqualone 
was included in the Drug Prevention of 
Misuse Act of 1971. Earlier than that, half 
the drug addicts in Japanese hospitals in the 
mid-Sixties were on quacks. 

Methaqualone has a somewhat bizarre 
origin. In the beginning it was touted as an 
anti-malaria drug and widely distributed in 
Africa. Its sedative qualities were noted in 
1955 and it was put on the market, first in 
Germany, as the latest in the postwar series 
of "non-barbiturate" downs that has in- 
cluded Ciba's Doriden (glutethimide) and 
Wallace's Miltown (meprobamate). All 
these "non-barbiturates" have eventually 
been found, after heavy promotion by the 
pharmaceutical industry and wide 
prescription by trusting doctors, to be about 
equally dangerous ...«. the barbiturates. 

The two commonest forms of the drug sold 
in the US are straight methaqualone (Sopor. 
Quaalude) and methaqualone hydrochloride 
(Parest, Optimil, Somnafac). The 
hydrochloride is absorbed by the system 
faster than the straight chemical. Also, for 
some reason, the hydrochloride is sold in 
capsule form, while Sopor and Quaalude are 
tablets. 



Reprinted from Rolling Stone with per- 
mission. 



The Critr— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



Page 6 — University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



No. Amherst Study Underway 



6 i 



The Zoning Map Committee, a 
recently formed subcommittee of 
the Planning Board, and the Office 
of the Town Planner are con- 
ducting a comprehensive study of 
the northern section of Amherst. ' 
The study Includes the villages of 
North Amherst and Cushman and 
is the first major step in the 
revision of the Zoning By-Law to 
reflect the recommendations of the 
Select Committee on Goals for 
. Amherst. 

In January, the Select Com- 
mittee on Goals recommended that 
the Town encourage the establish- 
ment of five villages as a method of 
moderating growth and protecting 
the natural characteristics of the 
community. These diverse 
villages, to be encouraged in 
traditional as well as new 
locations, will serve to control the 
Town's previously shapeless 
growth. 



Evaluation of Northern Amherst 
will serve as a "pilot study" for the 
formulation of techniques and 
procedures required to implement 
the village concept. Cushman and 
North Amherst are the only 
villages with the Town which have 
not been analyzed previously. This 
fact, along with the great diversity 
of land and housing types and the 
existing housing pattern, offers the 
study group an extraordinary 
planning challenge. 

The Office of the Town Planner 
will attempt to determine the 
pattern and nature of development 
which will best serve the future 
needs of the community. 
Evaluation of the area will include 
the study of population charac- 
teristics, land use, traffic patterns, 
natural features, and the steps 
required to insure that the present 
personality of the community is 
maintained and enhanced. 



Morton B. Braun, President of 
The Planning Services Group, Inc. 
of Cambridge, has been engaged to 
advise the Zoning Map Committee 
and the Planning Department. He 
will deal primarily with the 
technical aspects of using zoning 
as a tool to implement the concept 
of villages. In addition to his ex- 
cellent professional credentials, 
Mr. Braun has impressed the 
planning group with his concise 
and imaginative suggestions for 
dealing with Amherst's unusual 
problems. 

The Zoning Map Committee 
hopes to involve citizens in the 
planning process and expects to 
hold public meetings in the Fall to 
provide the community an op- 
portunity to directly influence its 
future. In the interim, the Office of 
the Town Planner welcomes any 
interested citizen who may have 
suggestions or comments. 



Focus , ' ' Irish Music 
On WMUA Monday 

Monday, July 30th, at 10 P.M., WMUA (UMass radio, 91.1 FM) will 
broadcast a live discussion with a leader in the nationwide movement to 
remove President Richard M. Nixon from the White House. 

The program is being presented as a special feature of "Focus," 
WMUA's weekly public affairs series moderated by Ken Mosakowski. 

Mosakowski's guest for the live, 60-minute forum will be Ms. Frances 
Gagnon of Springfield, who is Massachusetts State Coordinator of the 
Committee to Recall the President. 

Ms. Gagnon is presently circulating copies of a petition calling upon 
Congress "to exercise its Constitutional Power and discharge its Con- 
stitutional Responsibility by removing Richard M. Nixon from the 
Presidency forthwith, because he has obtained that Office by means 
which violated the Constitution and Laws of the United States, and 
because he has abused and perverted the Office of the Presidency to 
encroach on powers rightfully belonging to Congress and to attack the 
Liberties of the People." 



*•» 



It's Pollution, Not Fungus 



At 8 P.M. on Monday, July 30, WMUA's International Music Series will 
feature traditional and popular music from Ireland. John Feme will join 
host Joe C. to play and talk about the jigs, reels and contemporary 
showband sounds of his native land. 



If the lower leaves of your bean 
plants look yellow, bronzed, 
speckled or glazed don't assume 
you should use a fungicide spray, 
the UMass Suburban E xperiment 



* *AT ' 

OF SMITH COLLEGE 

jODEMY: 
•ftMSCj 

# 4 NORTHAMPTON 



Station at Waltham warns. 

The cause is in all probability air 
pollution, specifically 
photochemical smog, according to 
UMass plant specialists W. A. 
Feder and W. J. Manning. "The 
levels of photochemical oxidant 
were well above the injury level for 
beans during the week of July 4- 
July 11," according to Dr. Feder. A 
result is a characteristic 
discoloration on bean leaves, a 
condition that resembles bean rust 



Visit the 6th 
Oldest Theatre In 
The United States 
NOW at 7:00 & 9:00 

Burt Reynolds is 
Jhe Man Who 
Loved Cat 
Dancing. 




THE MAN WHO 
LOVED CAT DANCING 



BURT REYNOLDS SARAH MILES 



A Masque Ensemble 
Production 

John Van Druten's 

Bell, Book, 
and Candle 

July 27-29 and August 2-4 

Bowker Auditorium 

UMass 

8:00 P.M. 

Reservations: Call 545-2351 

Students w/ID FREE 
General Public $1.50 

An Evening of 
Enchantment! 



but is not a disease in the ordinary 
sense and therefore cannot be 
controlled by a fungicidal spray. 
"The plants will continue to grow 
and bear beans but you may pick 
fewer beans than could be ex- 
pected if the air quality were 
better," Dr. Feder explained. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
SEMINAR 

SPEAKER: Dr. Ian Morris, 
Department of Botany and 
Microbiology, University 
College London 

TITLE: Control of 
Photosynthesis 

TIME: 4:00 p.m., Monday, 
July 30, 1973 

PLACE: Room 1108, 
Graduate Research Tower 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Band — it is a happy, musical, enriching experience that 
makes it more than a concert. 

The concert is open to the public. Admission is free. The 
concert will take place at Haigis Mall in front of the Whit- 
more Administration Building at the University of 
Massachusetts at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 26. In case of rain 
the location will be the Student Union Ballroom. Summer 
students with I.D. will be seated first. 




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Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and (wo bedroom model apartments 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show you all the reasons in the world why BRANDYWINE is a 
better place to live. We invite you to compare features and com- 
pare prices The few minutes you spend with our two beautiful 
models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year 




Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently "liveable": 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sized appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat 
and cooking included in rent. 

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Large, partially enclosed private patios 
and balconies 
Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company, Hartford, 
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One bedroom units from $200 
Two bedroom units from $235 




Brandy wine at Amherst 



ami 



50 Meadow St. 
Amherst 

549-0600 



mmm 



"Top Hat" Coming August 2nd 



Horse Wash 



Probably the most popular dance 
team ever, Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers reigned king and 
queen of the American musical 
from their start in the mid-thirties 
With "Swingtime" at which time 
the field was dominated by Busby 
Berkeley. While Berkeley's films 
were still a bit static in trying to 
combine motion with sound, 
Astaire and Rogers made the 
transition of story line to musical 
number as gracefully as their 
bodies moved. Their movies are 
intimate where Berkeley's are 
cold, and eventually, as best ex- 
pressed in "Top Hat" the musical 
numbers just sneak in without any 
explanation and you are swept 
away in the rythyms. Where most 

Workshop Here 

"Innovations in Business and 
)ffice Occupations", the first in an 
mnual series of in-service 
workshops for business educators 
n the Commonwealth, will be held 
at UMass July 30 through Aug. 3. 
The purpose of the conference is 
to explore the use of new 
techniques, including office 
simulation, in business and office 
education. Enrollment is limited to 
100 applicants, who will be selected 
on a first come, first served basis. 

It is being co-sponsored by the 
Division of Occupational 
Education of the state Department 
of Education and the Center for 
Occupational Education of the 
UMass School of Education. The 
conference will be held at the 
UMass Campus Center. 

A featured speaker will be one of 
the nation's outstanding educators 
in the busines and vocational field, 
Peter G. Haines of Michigan State 
University. He will present seven 
of the fifteen conference modules. 

Keynote addresses will be given 
by Dean Wendell Smith of the 
UMass School of Business Ad- 
ministration and Associate Dean 
Norma Jean Anderson of the 
School of Education. 

Others to be featured include 
three from the state Department of 
Education: Mark Goldman, 
supervisor specialist of the 
Division of Occupational 
Education; Richard Oakes, senior 
supervisor of management ser- 
vices; and Paul Carbone, chief of 
business and office occupations for 
the Division of Occupational 
Education. 

Coordinators are Carbone, 
Jeanann S. Boyce of the Center for 
Occupational Education at UMass 
and Patricia A. Fredrickson of the 
Amherst Regional High School 
faculty. Registration forms and 
full information may be obtained 
from the Division of Continuing 
Education, 920 Campus Center, 
UMass Amherst, 01002. 

UM Gets Grant 

WASHINGTON, D.C., - U.S. 
Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R-Mass., and 
Sen. Edward W. Brooke today 
announced that the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst has 
been awarded a $257,000 grant 
from the Office of Education of the 
Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare. 

The one-year grant will provide 
support for 22 graduate fellowships 
in the management of educational 
change at the University's School 
of Education. 

Classifieds 

FOR SALE 

TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 1218 
auto changer, SONY TC 55 port, cassette, 
Eico427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5171. 

t7/31 

For Sale 1967 Chev. Bel Air. gd. cond., 3 
spd, new clutch, $150. Call 549 1332 betore 3 
p.m. 

t8/2 

For Sale 1969 Yamaha 305 cc, excellent 
cond., $300. Call 256 8104 after 6 p.m. 

1 8/2 

LOST 

Clipboard Held notes on education articles. 
Very important. Reward. Call 549 0865 

17/26 

Research notes in library microfilm room 
on 6/23/73. Pleas* give to library lost and 
found. No questions asked. 

17/26 

WANTED 

Student experienced n doing tech. Inking 
and/or drafting on a reg. part time hourly 
basis. Phone Mrs. Camus at 5 2008 

7/26, 7/31, l/i 



of Berkeley's numbers are stagey 
and the songs are usually 
forgettable (with the possible 
exception of "We're in the Money" 
from "Gold-Diggers of 1933") 
Astaire and Rogers stay part of the 
story and incorporate such tunes 
as Irving Berlin's "Cheek to 
Cheek" and "Isn't this a Lovely 
Day?". 

What usually dates films is not 
necessarily the dialogue or the 
attitudes, it is usually the failure of 
the image to keep us moving. A 
film is not a play in pictures, it is a 



business; nor does the American 
film audience wish to see the "old" 
movies -- as if Television repeats 
were never watched either. Why 
don't people go to see the old films? 
The fact is that I feel they don't 
trust their own judgement, they 
feel that those old films are now to 
naive for them. Let me assure you 
that whether viewed as "camp" 
(so often a term used to cover up 
feeling that the work of art is really 
good, but if it is, why has everyone 
ignored it - the nervous laughter in 
the theatre is often indicative of too 



NEW BALTIMORE, Mich. - 

When a palomino steps from a car 
wash here and shakes soapsuds off 
his back, it means Marilyn Lucido 
is preparing for a horse show. 

"The love it," she said as she 
soaked one of her horses with 120- 
degree water from a spray nozzle 
and swished soapsuds on his back. 

"It's like a whirlpool bath for 



humans." 

Marilyn, who said she got the 
idea from a fellow showman, 
admitted she wasn't sure what 
would happen the first time she 
tried the wash. "I didn't know what 
the horse would do, but she 
shocked me," she said. "She just 
stood there and really seemed to 
like it." 



beast of its own kind, utilizing the many people intellectualizing their 



fact that your as spectator can 
move without ever leaving your 
seat. The Astaire-Rogers films do 
this so well that I fail to see why 
anyone could consider them dated. 
Astaire himself is most responsible 
for this since after his first two 
films he began directing his own 
numbers with great success. What 
his efforts proved was that a 
successful transition could be 
made from silents to sound. 

For all the hoopla about the 
failure of contemporary film 
musicals to entertain, no one 
seems interested in learning from 
the time when musicals were big 



emotions) or viewed as serious art, 
films like "Top Hat" are pure 
entertainment on a much higher 
level than the recently released 
"Fiddler on the Roof" and 
"Oliver", not to mention the 
terrible film version of "Jesus 
Christ, Super Star" that looks like 
a cheap Las Vegas dinner show. 
"Top Hat" will be shown in 
Mahar Auditorium, Univ. of Mass. 
on August 2 at 7:30 and 9:30. The 
showing is sponsored by the 
Amherst Film Coop, a non-profit 
film society dedicated to 
promoting film as art and en- 
tertainment in this area. 




Crossword Puzzle 



(^HERSfs g| DEPARTMENT STQREjf 

Bedspreads $5.50 to $7.50 
Oriental Design Rugs 

$5.95 and up 

(r/NlEXT TO THE PQSf OFFICE ON N, PLEASANfSTTn 



ACROSS 

1 High mountain 
4 Snips off 
9 Headgear 

1 2 Meadow 

13 Boundary 

14 Be in debt 

15 Evergreen tree 

16 Girl's name 

17 Recent 

18 Spread for dry- 

ing 

20 American ex- 
plorer 

22 Landed 

24 Footlike part 

25 Location 

28 Dry, as wine 

29 Flying mammal 

30 Tree of birch 

family 

31 Helped 

33 Smooth the 

feathers 

34 Tremulous 

35 Obscure 

36 Fish eggs 

38 Thin 

39 Army officer 

(abbr.) 

40 Tolled 

41 Former Russian 

rulers 

43 Dine 

44 Mohammedan 

name 
46 Filaments 
48 Mans name 

51 Sign of zodiac 

52 Part of church 

(pi) 

53 Grain 

54 Number 

55 Girl's name 

56 Brood of phea- 

sants 

DOWN 

1 Mans 
nickname 



2 Hawaiian 

wreath 

3 Act of sharing 

with others 

4 Clothed 

5 Free of 

6 Egg dish 

7 Heaps 

8 Cook slowly 

9 Deliberation 

10 Reverence 

1 1 Church bench 
19 Latin conjunc- 
tion 

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island 

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23 Rent 

24 Cushion 

26 Cut for inser- 

tion into mor- 
tise 

27 Teutonic deity 
29 Man's 

nickname 



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40 Sun god 



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greatest kings 

43 Actual being 

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45 Confederate 

general 
47 Soak 

49 Beam 

50 Devoured 



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IV 




P»9e 8— University of Massachusetts— The Criar 



Dr. Harold Taylor, who at age 
thirty gained national prominence 
when he became the youngest 
president in the history of Sarah 
Lawrence College, will be guest 
speaker at the UMass University 
Year for ACTION Training Con- 
ference to be held July 28th on the 
UMass campus. 

It was at Sarah Lawrence that 
Dr. Taylor's ideas for experiment 
in education, student democracy, 
and the reform of university 
curriculum first drew in- 
ternational attention and acclaim. 
After fourteen years as president, 
Dr. Taylor left Sarah Lawrence in 
1960 to return to his work in lec- 
turing, teaching and writing. Since 
then he has travelled to Asia, 
Russia, the Middle East and 
Europe, conferring with political 
leaders, writers, artists, students, 
educators and intellectuals on the 
problems of world society. 

He has continued to develop 
pioneer educational experiments, 
among which was the pilot project 
for a World College, whose 
students from twenty-two United 
Nations countries and a completely 
international faculty developed a 
model for a world curriculum. 

In addition, Dr. Taylor is co- 
founder of the National Committee 
for Support of the Public Schools, 
as well as Chairman and founder of 
the National Research Council on 
Peace Strategy, a group of 
distinguished scholars and 
scientists involved in research on 
peace/war issues. Dr. Taylor has 
also served as consultant on 
human rights to the late Adlai 
Stevenson and the Eleanor 
Roosevelt Foundation, has lec- 
tured in foreign universities at the 
invitation of the State Department, 
and has written extensively on the 
topics of philosophy, social change 
and education, publishing five 
books in the past three years. 

Currently, Dr. Taylor is chair- 
man of the U.S. Committee for the 

What's A Canary? 

CLEVELAND. Ohio - "What's a 
canary" asks a pet store manager 
here. 

"We haven't had one in here for 
at least six months. I forgot what 
they look like," George Kratsas of 
Parma Pets added. 

With the birds reported in Short 
supply throughout the country, the 
price of canaries, finches, parrots 
and mynas has soared. 

The Department of Agriculture 
banned many pet imports after 
Newcastle disease wiped out 
nearly four million birds in U.S. 
poultry flocks last year. The in- 
fection was traced to imported 
exotic birds. 

Fred D. Lowinger, manager of 
Doktors Pet Center, said he bought 
eight canaries last week for $25 
each, more than triple what they 
sold for last year. 

Other pet stores said they have 
paid as much as $60 for a canary. 



»T nndsjatiiujciij — • ■■« mm ■■< 

Taylor To Speak At UY A Conference 

,__ ._.,__ _r_-_ .t-i.-j kt.»: m_; „ i( „f.,i,ini, tu rooiitu n f itc nwn lifp " surrounding low-income com- students nee 



United Nations University, which 
includes Buckminster Fuller, 
Margaret Mead, Norman Cousins 
and Andrew Cordier. He is 
Director of the World University 
Student Project, which is at- 
tempting to coordinate the efforts 
of student organizations around the 
world on behalf of social change, 
liberation and the peace 
movement. He is also a consultant 
to the International Secretariat for 
Volunteer Service, an organization 
dealing with forty-seven United 
Nations countries with volunteers 
placed throughout the world. 

Dr. Taylor has been called "The 
leading advocate of the student 
cause in the current world-wide 
student rebellion", and Students 
Without Teachers; The Crisis in 
the University, published in 1969, 
was referred to by the New York 
Times Book Review as a 
"blueprint for radical change in 
the whole style and purpose of our 
colleges and universities." 

In that book, Dr. Taylor states 
that "the colleges and universities 
have within them a set of ex- 
traordinary resources for the 
transformation of human lives, 
and for the creation of new models 
of human community which can 
change the quality and character 
of life in that society." 

"It is from the university that 
students may go into their society 
to teach what they are learning and 
have learned to others in the 
community. It is to the university 
that the community may turn for 
help, while refreshing the stores of 
academic knowledge there with 
facts and experience drawn from 



the reality of its own life." 

That central theme is restated in 
Dr. Taylor's most recent book, 
HOW TO CHANGE COLLEGES 
(1970), where he says, "The World 
is the campus, and the college is a 
central learning space with which 
the students identify and where 
they make their intellectual home. 
They move out from that center 
with its libraries, laboratories, 
teachers and cdurses into the 
surrounding communities and 
institutions, in order to learn by 
direct experience what is going on 
there, and bring back what they 
have learned to add to what they 
can continue learning on the 
college campus." 

Certainly, such ideas about the 
most important mission of colleges 
and universities make Dr. Taylor 
an ideal speaker at any gathering 
of University Year for ACTION, a 
program which was begun in 1971 
with the expressed purpose of 
opening up the vast human and 
material resources of the 
universities of this country to the 



surrounding 
munities. 

Since that time, University Year 
for ACTION at the University of 
Massachusetts/Amherst has 
placed 255 students in responsible, 
one-year positions with community 
agencies throughout western 
Massachusetts, offering them in 
return, a full-year of academic 
orpciit 

University Year for ACTION 
does this in the belief, as Harold 
Taylor has said, that "what 



students need is not protection, but 
freedom and responsibilities, and 
the chance to show what they, can 
do when they come to grips with 
the issues confronting their 
generation and ours." 

"I am not arguing that only the 
universities can save us," he 
continues, "I am arguing that 
unless the universities take the 
leadership in giving us a sense of 
direction and unity of purpose to 
the social order, we are unlikely to 
be saved." 




Amherst's Tire Store- 



i 



*) 



Firestone 
MICHELIN 



Shell Jetzon 
x veith Pirelli 




Le Hovre Rodiol Tires 



Steei Belted 



Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 



July 31, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 11 






PLAZA SHELL <o> 



Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 



iii 



M 



What do you wear 
to an Instant Party? 



A Yago Sant'Gria T-shirt, 
of course. 



.^ 




Crier Photo/Gib Follerton 



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Parking Protests - Littlefield Comments 



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The Office of the Town Planner 
announces that it will be con- 
ducting a land use survey of North 
Amherst and Cushman during the 
next several weeks. The survey is 
part of the "Northern Amherst" 
village study which the Office of 
the Town Planner is conducting for 
the Zoning Map Committee. The 
information will be used to give an 
overview of the community's 
present development, and will be 
helpful when rezoning decisions 
are made. 

During the survey personnel 
from the Office of the Town 
Planner will wear Town of 
Amherst name tags for iden- 
tification purposes. 



/ 



Cut 
out 



By STEVE TRIPOLI 

Whitmore Administration 
building, the Physical Plant, and 
the new steam plant at Tilson 
Farm were all the scene of protest 
marching and "informational" 
picketing yesterday as students 
and staff hit the pavement to 
protest the hike in parking fees 
which is slated to go into effect 
here this fall. 

Staff members, who as state 
employees have a no strike clause 
written into their contracts, 
staggered their lunch hours and 
marched in their free time. They 
stressed that their picketing was 
"informational" in nature, and not 
a strike, and that they were not 
barring delivery trucks from the 
receiving areas, but merely in- 
forming the drivers of the situation 
and hoping that they would turn 



around. Better than half the 
drivers who were to deliver to 
Physical Plant Shipping and 
Receiving did so, mainly due to the 
cooperation of Springfield 
Teamsters local 404, which was 
cooperating with local 1776 of 
UMass. 

At Whitmore about 50 staff 
members and students, including 
local 1776 President Carol Drew 
and Student Senate Speaker David 
Booker, marched in front of the 
building. Ms. Drew would not 
comment on the possibility of a 
strike in the fall, saying that it 
would be "stupid" for her to 
comment since a no strike clause 
was written into the contract which 
members of the union have with 
the University. 

She did comment on action taken 
by other unions, however, saying 



COUPON 
mail TO: YAGO SANT'GRIA-TS 
P.O. Box 707, Darien, Conn. 06820 



Please send me. 



.Yago Sant'Gria T-shirts 



(amount) 

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Size: □ Small Q Large 

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You drink Yago Sant'Gria anywhere, anytime 
you're having fun. So that's when you wear the ^ 
new Yago Sant'Gria T-shirt. It's already being 
seen on the greatest guys and girls on 
campuses, beaches everywhere. It's a real 
good T-shirt, of soft high-quality cotton, 
a conversation-starter, and terrific value at $2.00. 
Says "Anytime, anywhere" on the front and 
"Yago Sant'Gria" on the back in bold red. 
Have several. And have Yago, at school, at home, 
in campers, at beach and vacation scenes. 
Just bring cups and ice, pour Yago and serve. 
Yago's an Instant Party because it's pre-mixed in 
Spain of rich red wine and the natural 
goodness of Spain's magnificent orange and 
lemon juices. Stock up on Yago and 
send in the coupon Now. iMaHBaaiaBiaaHHidl 

Yago sanrGfia. Spanish red wine mixed with citrus iruit juices. 23 5 oz • Imported from Spain by Monsieur Henri Wines Ltd., New York. 



ADDRESS. 



CITY. 



STATE. 



.ZIP. 



SCHOOL 

VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY STATE. 



in 



— 



1,10,1 




that they would "sympathize" with 
1776, as in the case of local 404. 
When informed of Planning 
Director Jack Littlefield's 
statement that the parking fee hike 
should be implemented now so that 
it can be tested instead of 
procrastinating longer, Drew 
commented, "That's about his 
speed, that yo-yo." 

Senate Speaker Booker, when 
asked what action the Student 
Senate would be taking on the 
hikes, told the Crier that he and 
committee chairmen Mike 
Gregory and Rick Savini were 
considering drawing up a letter to 
be sent to students explaining the 
situation. 

Reaction of people on the line to 
the hikes was mostly an agry one. 
Bill Smith, a janitor in the 
Graduate Research Center, said, 
"I'm not making enough now - why 
should I have to pay to park where 
I work?" Mary Turcotte, chapter 
chairperson of local 1776, said that 
the hikes were "raping our con- 
tract. They're (the administration) 
experimenting and we're the 
guinea pigs." 

Roland Messier, Recording 
Secretary of 1776 who was 
picketing outside the Physical 
Plant, told the Crier that "at least 
five" trucks had turned away 
yesterday morning instead of 
making deliveries, while three 
others (non-union) had crossed and 
others had called their offices to 
find out what to do. He said that the 
people picketing the gates were 
merely informing the drivers when 
they approached of what was going 
on and that they had done nothing 
to stop any of them. 

A rally is scheduled for the steps 
of the Student Union today at noon. 
Protests are expected to continue 
until action of some sort is taken on 
the proposal, which appears to be 
unpalatable to many people who 
will have to live with it. 



By STEVE TRIPOLI 

"After six years of procastination and delay this is the first year that a 
proposal has reached the Board of Trustees." And so Director of Plan- 
ning Jack Littlefield feels that the time has come to implement a new 
parking proposal and mass transit plan at UMass. Ironically, as he spoke 
to this reporter yesterday in the University News Service Offices in 
Whitmore, picketers could be seen outside protesting the very same 
proposal of which he spoke. 

When asked for his reaction to the picketers, Littlefield stated that as 
far as he was concerned it was a "demonstration." 

His reaction to charges that the administration had negotiated in poor 
faith on the issue were answered with a simple "I disagree." Littlefield 
claimed that the staff had stated their views and the administration had 
stated theirs in negotiations. "The problem is that we have delayed on 
this campus too long", Littlefield stated. He claimed that it had come to a 
point where "a decision had to be made." 

According to Littlefield the new proposal will provide for increased 
security, especially in the peripheral lots where it is hoped many people 
will park. Most of the security will come from "redirected effort" ac- 
cording to Littlefield. He also stated that there will be stiffer fines and 
more towing of parking offenders. 

Littlefield maintains that the ultimate goal ot the new plan is still to 
make the middle of campus green. He says that the plan is the "first 
major step to making the peripheral lots reasonable parking resources," 
which would hopefully empty the middle of campus ultimately. He feels 
that in the long run this will be demonstrated. 

When asked why the plan had come out and been implemented for the 
most part with no regular students around, Littlefield stated that both he 
and Chancellor Bromery "would have much preferred to start this 
earlier." He also stated that there had been student input in the Parking 
and Transportation Council, which had done the basic planning for the 

proposal. 

Littlefield's chief concern appears to be that the new proposal be at 
least tried. He feels that the system should be "given a chance to work - to 
fail or prove itself" through implementation. 

But it appears that if the people who could be seen out the window 
marching while he spoke could have their way, there'd be no new 
proposal at all. 



(DMUfl- 1 Toda y 



There will be a rally at noon 
today on the steps of the Student 
Union to provide information on 
the status of the parking con- 
troversy. If you can't make it, and 
because of the importance of the 
issue to many people both on and 
off campus, WMUA (91.1 FM) will 
cover the rally live beginning at 
11:55 A.M. WMUA News Director 



Al Feinberg will be there to cover 
the proceedings and provide 
background information and Steve 
Tripoli, Editor-in-Chief of the 
Massachusetts Daily Collegian, 
will provide commentary and 
background info. That's today 
starting at 11:55 A.M. on WMUA, 
91.1 FM 



Crltr PMo/Oib Folltrt»n 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 






Crier 



The Criei is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Zamir Nestlcbaum 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors' 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Zamir Nestlebaum 

Tony Granite 

Jerry Lazar 




Sam is busy typing up copy for 
Thursday's Crier (who did you 
think wrote all those stories with no 
bylines?) He's also kind of angry 
that none of you have come in to 
help him. But it's OK with him - he 
doesn't think any of you are his 
type anyway. 



*1» *1* «X» *A» «A» *A* *A* *Xr *A» "^* *4r -1? *&* >1? ^A? *£?*£? ^1? >lf ^f "^ ^Itf ^4^ ^f il^ ^^ iltf ^f ^^ ^ ^Jc" 
IK 3Js #*j».e*^* e*j% ^* ^* ^p ^p*^p* ^^ ^p ^p* ^p ^p* ^P^P T^ ^P* ^* ^* *^ ^^ ^T* ^r* ^r* ^r* ^r* ^P ^r* ^T* 



* 

* 

* 
•x- 

•x- 

* 
•x- 
* 



Crier Quiz 



■ 

■ 




Here's today's Mystery Man, and the hint is this: 
you've all heard his name a lot lately. And if you're 
the first person to make it to Room 402 Student 
Union and tell us his name, you too may become the 
pride of Nutting Ave. (see picture below) 




Here's last Thursday's contest 
winner, Jean Niven of 30 Nutting 
Ave., an English major. She 
guessed our Mystery Woman as 
Olympic Ice Skater Janet Lynn, 
and here's her reward. We bet 
she's the pride of Nutting Ave. 



•X- 

1 

i 

* 
* 
•X- 



Strike?!? Why Not? 



I recently ran into one of my buddies wandering 
around, wearing his white summer armband. 

"Hey Herbie. How've ya been?" I asked. 

"Power baby! We gotta organize, organize, build a 
people's movement, right here in Amherst, topple 
this motherfucking white honkey assed wasp shit 
kicking power structure." 

"Right on!" I exclaimed clenching my fist in the 
air. "Say, what've you been up to lately," I inquired. 

"Well, I just did a gig at Watkins Glen. You know 
there were a lot of right on people up there. A lot of 
heavy bad ass dudes. But you know I've been 
orginizin. Organizin all the time. By the way, ya hear 
about the strike?" 

"Strike? What Strike?" I innocently burped. 

"Yeah Man, Strike! ! ! What's a summer without a 
Strike. We gotta strike every summer so our brothers 
and sisters can get back to nature, if that's possible in 
this filthy polluted world. We gotta beat on them pigs. 
Stomp on em. Put em Up Against The Wall and do a 
number. But we gotta be peaceful. NONVIOLENT! 
We don't have to lower ourselves to their fascist 
level." 

"But why strike now?" I threw up. 

"Why Now? Why Now? WHY NOT NOW!!!" 
Herbie machinegunned. "The Time Is Prime! 
Man! ! " he shot. "Look the way the system is set up is 
we need to have a student-worker strike every so 
often. Man its built into the system. The system 
couldn't function without it. Without a strike during 
the good weather - Man there'd be ANARCHY! 
There'd be classes. What would the Pigs around here 
do. Where would Whitmore be without occasional 
student unrest. Where would the Brentlingers be 
without strikes. Where would Apple Records be? 
Where would Joan Baez be without David?" 

"Man I see your point! I can really dig it," I 
chortled. "So what's the story?" 

"Story is, that the U.M.A.B.A.S.R.S. Strike is set 
for Thursday night at Bowker Auditorium, where 
we're gonna put the show on the road." 

"What does that stand for?" I queried. 

"Man that's obvious. It stands for the University of 
Massachusetts Annual Bad Assed Summer Reunion 
Strike!!! Can you dig it. We got a heavy list of 
demands that we're presenting to the Chancellor and 

Campus Carousel 



until they're met, NO CLASSES. 
"What are they?" I diligently pursued. 
"Okay: 

1. Yoko Ono goes back to Japan. 

2. Tricky Dicky's gotta end the war. (a concession 
to the Mobe). 

3. Tricky Dicky's gotta pull out. (a concession to 
Pat). 

4. Orchard Hill's gotta be turned into a Gay-Afro- 
Am-Women's Commune. 

5. Worcester Dining Commons must serve 
Bangladesh brown rice on its annual Polish Night. 

6. The New Library must be torpedoed. 

7. Charles "peace baby" Manson must be given a 
high position on the Philadelphia Police Force under 
Brother Frank Rizzo, to fully utilize his talents. 

8. Dwight Allen must join too. 

9. The Student Senate must be sent on a world tour 
to show all underprivileged nations how democracy 
really works. 

10. Richard Nixxon (he's changed the name but not 
the stripes) must stop observing "Reichstag Day" at 
the White House. 

11. John Wayne must expose his real name to the 
nation - that of Marion! ! ! 

12. Free all political prisoners including Ma 
Barker, Bruno Sammartino, Tom Funchess and 
David Baez. 

13. Long live Che and the Revolution! ! ! ! ! !" 
"Far Fuckin Out", I gasped. "This'U get em. But 

what if we don't get all our demands?" 

"Well then there's always next spring, and the next 
summer and the one after that and after that." 
Herbie yelped with glee. "Are ya with us?" 

"Yeah Man, Power To The People!" I shouted. "By 
the way how many classes can I cut? I whispered. 

"Right On!!! Give me some skin!! Baby!!!" 
Herbie belched, ignoring my plea. 

"Hey Herbie," I admiringly said, "You really sold 
me on this strike. I'm ready to protest and picket and 
sit in and throw rocks and everything. You should 
work for Madison Ave.!" 

All of the sudden as if I'd rubbed the magic lamp, 
Herbie's face grew dark and a hideous toothy grin 
stretched over his face from ear to ear as he ex- 
claimed: "I DO!!!!!" 



Beer Is Source Of Protein 



By TONY GRANITE 
CRIME RATE at USoFla. for the 

first six months of 1973 was up 
almost four per cent over the same 
period in 1972, according to The 
Oracle. 

University police records show 
3.93 per cent increases. Cited are 55 
bicycle thefts, $10,000 increase in 
property, and over 300 per cent rise 
in drug-related arrests. Decreases 
are recorded in automobile thefts, 
assaults and stolen private 
property. 

Two investigators are working 

on 90 cases outstanding. 

"» * * * 

BEER FOR PROTEIN has been 
suggested in a letter to the editor of 
the Northern Iowan of Northern 
Iowa U. 



"Since there is going to be a 
meat shortage, or there is a meat 
shortage, and many people are 
becoming vegetarian because it is 
a more efficient source of protein, I 
suggest that warm and cold lager 
beer be served at the Union all day. 
The brewer's yeast in this 
beverage is an excellent source of 
protein.' 



• * * 



A BIKE REPAIR CO-OP is 

operating at Indiana U. by the 
Student Association, according to a 
piece in the Indiana Daily Student. 

A four-man staff has been 
teaching cyclists to fix their own 
wheels and makes tools available 
for the purpose. Open from 3-5 p.m. 
every day, the Co-op opened during 



Spring semester and is continuing 
through the summer. The only 
condition for servicing a bike is 
that the owner must register it with 
the campus cops, to make recovery 
of stolen wheels "much better." 

"YOU BLEW IT" is how the 
Northeastern News editorialized 
the apathy of students who stayed 
away in droves when Northeastern 
U's executive vice-president ap- 
peared to explain the need for a 
tuition increase for nest year. 

The lead paragraph on the 
editorial read, "Students recently 
blew their best chance of finding 
out the whys and wherefores of the 
University budget since Moses 
came off Mount Sinai with a copy 
of the annual fiscal report for 
Palestine." 



31st World Sci-Fi Convention 



******************************* 
Letters Policy 



The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The trier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



The 31st World Science Fiction 
Convention (called TORCON-2) 
will be held in Toronto from August 
31 to Sept. 3 at the Royal York 
Hotel. Members of the convention 
($4 supporting, . $7 attending to 
August 1, but $10 after Aug. 1 and 
at the door. Write TORCON-2 at P. 
O. Box 4, Station K, Toronto, On- 
tario M4P 2G1) are eligible to vote 
on the Science Fiction 
Achievement Awards -called 
Hugos, which will be awarded at 
the convention banquet. The 
following list of nominees is 
presented with the idea that 
nominees have to be fairly good-so 
why not look them up and see how 
close your choices are to the 
results. 

NOVELS 
There will be Time - Anderson 
The Gods Themselves - Asimov 
When Harlie Was One - Gerrold 
The Book of Skulls - Silverberg 
Dying Inside - Silverberg 
A Choice of Gods - Simak 

NOVELLAS 
Hero - Haldeman 
The Word for World is Forest - 
LeGuin (Again Dangerous Visions) 
The Gold at Starbow's End - Pohl 
(Analog & collection by same 
name) 

The Mercenary - Pournelle 
The Fifth Head of Cerberus - Wolfe 
(Orbit) 



NOVELLETTE 
Goat Song - Anderson (Fantasy & 
Science Fiction) 

A Kingdom by the Sea - Dozois 
(Orbit) 

Basilisk - Ellison (Fantasy & 
Science Fiction) 

Patron of the Arts - Rotsler 
(Universe) 

Painwise - Tiptree (Fantasy & 
Science Fiction) 

SHORT STORIES 
Eurema's Dam - Lafferty (New 
Dimensions 2) 

The Meeting - Pohl & Kornbluth 
(Fantasy & Science Fiction) 
When It Changed - Russ 
When We Went to See the End of 
the World - Silverberg (Universe 2) 



And I Awoke & Found Me Here on 
the Cold Hill's Side - Tiptree (New 
Dimensions 2) 

BEST PROFESSIONAL 
EDITOR 

Ben Bova (Analog) 
Terry Carr (Best S. F. of the Year, 
Universe) 

Edward Ferman (Fantasy & 
Science Fiction) 
Ted White (Amazing, Fantastic) 
Don Wolheim (DAW Books) 

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST 
Vincent DiFate 
Frank Kelly Freas 
Jack Gaughan 
Mike Hinge 
John Schoenerr 



Don't Forge* the RALLY! 

TODAY AT NOON 

on the steps of the Student Union - find out 
what 's going on with the parking situation 




The Masque Ensemble, currently enjoying its third successful summer as the resident theatre 
company at UMass, can be seen this weekend in Bell, Book, and Candle, John Van Druten's delightful 
comedy about witchcraft and romance. The show will be presented August 2, 3, and 4 in Bowker 
Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. Admission is free to UMass students with summer ID's and $1.50 for the general 
public. Reservations can be made at the RSO Office, second floor of the Student Union, 545-2351, or at the 
door on evenings of performance. 



Hollywood On The Mediterranean 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



e e 



In The Good Old 
Summertime ' ' 



On August 6 and 7 the Masque 
Ensemble story theatre workshop 
will present "In The Good Old 
Summertime," an original script 
which takes a nostalgic look at life 
in small town America. The 
production, directed by Michelle 
Faith, is an imaginative presen- 
tation of inter-related stories in 
which actors become characters, 
animals, machines, and en- 
vironment. The performers, all 
students from the summer 
workshop, include David Baldwin, 
John Countryman, Joan Deely, 
Marcy Ertel, Allen Kurtz, Andy 



Seid, Andrea Signorella, and 
Elizabeth Thompson. The 
production makes use of a vast 
array of talents including folk and 
"homemade" instruments, singing 
folk songs, square dancing, 
preaching, and parading. 
Costumes have been designed by 
Marcy Ertel and the theatrical 
environment is by Ray Nichols. 

"In the Good Old Summertiime" 
will be performed at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Commonwealth Room of the 
Student Union building at U. Mass. 
Admission is free to the general 
public. 



ALMERIA. Spain - They call it 
Hollywood-on-the-Mediterranean. 

The desert battles of Lawrence 
of Arabia, the armored victories of 
Geroge Patton and uncounted 
shootouts between Italian actors 
disguised as western desperadoes 
all have been recorded on these 
plains of Spain. 

Since 1954, Almeria has been 
host to more than 175 film com- 
panies from America, Italy, 
England, France-and even some 
from Spain. Why should the film 
makers descend on this placid 
Costa del Sol city of 120,000? 

Why? Because of California - 
like weather; hills and canyons 
that resemble the Old West. Sand 
dunes that can double for Arabia or 
Death Valley. Western towns 
better than those in Hollywood. An 



abundance of gypsy extras willing 
to work 10 hours a day for $8, plus 
$1.50 an hour for overtime vs. 
$35.65 daily for Hollywood extras. 

Latest of the companies to visit 
Almeria is "Harry Spikes," a 
western starring Lee Marvin. 
Director Richard Fleischer ex- 
plains: 

"This is a 'traveling western' - 
one in which the characters move 
from one town to another. It would 
be impossible to make in the 
United States, because the building 
of western sets would be 
prohibitive. There is one in Tucson, 
but that's about all. 

"Here in Almeria, the western 
sets are all standing. And they are 
not just building fronts, either. I 
can move right into the bars and 
banks and shoot the interiors." 




Several key personnel of "Harry 
Spikes" are English: the rest are 
workers from Madrid studies. 

Filming in Almeria has its 
drawbacks, admitted Fleischer: 

"We've had bad weather - 
sunshine, then overcast, then wind, 
so that it's hard to match shots. 
Also, there is the lannguage 
barrier. You have to be careful 
with the signs the Spaniards make. 
For instance, the script called for a 
sign on a hamlet saloon. So the sign 
read: Hamlet Saloon." 

Almeria was discovered for 
films in 1954. The first big 
production to shoot here was "El 
Cid," starring Charlton Heston in 
1960. Then came the flood: "King 
of Kings," "Cleopatra," 
"Lawrence of Arabia," "The 
Centurions," "Bobruk," "Villa 
Rides," "2001: A Space Odyssey" 
the prehistoric scenes, "100 
Rifles," "Patton," "Shalake," and 
on and on. 




Summer Workshop students rehearse a scene from "In The Good 
Old Summertime" which will be presented in the Commonwealth 
Room of the Student Union on August 6 and 7 at 8:00 p.m. Admission 
is free. 



Hal Boyle 



Fun Facts 



NEW YORK - Things a 
columnist might never know if he 
didn't open his mail: 

If a child's fingernails are cut 
before his first birthday, he will 
grow up a thief, according to an old 
belief in rural England. To prevent 
this, some parents there still bite 
the nails of infants. 



MJ Is OK With Them 



Would you believe that this pipe broke in the new Library last 
week. That's a lot of water, and a lot of damage. Will the wonders of 
UMass architecture never cease? 



HYANNIS, Mass. - Legalization 
of the private use of marijuana was 
given two-to-one approval Monday 
by lawyers, judges, law professors 
and state officials gathered here to 
plan model laws. 

The National Conference of 
Commissioners of Uniform 
State Laws calls it "decrim- 
inalization" of marijuana 
use. Under the proposal, 
it would simply no longer 
be illegal to possess small amounts 
of marijuana, or even to distribute 
the drug if the quantities remain 
small, and there is no profit in- 
volved. 

The proposal comes in a 
somewhat different and perhaps 
more influential posture than 
similar stands taken by other 
segments of the organized legal 
community. 

In 1970, the commissioners 
drafted a Uniform Controlled 
Substances Act that has been 
adopted by some two-thirds of the 
states. The marijuana provision 
was fashioned as an amendment to 
that act. 

Some sections within the 
American Bar Association, by far 
the largest organized legal body in 
the nation, have taken similar 
"decriminalization" approaches. 
The association itself, however, is 
on record as recommending only 
reduction of severe penalties for 
use of the drug. 

The APA is scheduled to consider 
the issue again at its annual 
meeting in Washington, DC, in 
the next two weeks. 

Under the model legislation 
drafted here, possession of one 
ounce or less would be legal. Public 



consumption or possession of the 
drug would continue to be 
unlawful, as would growing 
marijuana. 

The commissioners are ap- 
pointed as representatives of their 
respective states, and are obliged 
to push for passage at home of 
model legislation approved by the 
conference. 

While some of the com- 
missioners obviously felt the 
proposal went too far, others felt it 
did not go far enough. 

Robert H. Cornell of San 
Francisco attacked the "inherent 
hypocrisy" of permitting private 
use, but prohibiting the sale or 
cultivation. 

Precedents for such treatment 
abound, contended Michael R. 
Sonnenreich, a staff member of the 
conference committee which 
recommended decriminalization. 

Sonnenreich cited Supreme 
Court decisions which permit 
private possession of hard core 
pornography, while condeming its 
sale or distribution. 

In other action Monday, the 
conference finally approved a 
measure that would provide 
compensation by the states for 
victims of violent crime. 

Under the terms of the uniform 
law, victims would be com- 
pensated for economic loss up to 
$200 a week until a miximum of 
$50,000 has been reached. 

The maximum benefits match 
those found in legislation now 
before Congress which would 
supply federal funds to finance 75 
per cent of the cost of a state 
compensation program. 



Does the man in the moon seem 
farther away from you now than 
when you were very young? Well, 
he has moved off a bit. Every 30 
years, astronomers figure, the 
moon's orbit around the earth 
moves one foot further out in 
space. 

Friends and relatives who live 50 
or more miles apart don't visit or 
write each other as often as they 
did 10 years ago, but they do keep 
in closer touch by phone. The 
number of people who telephoned 
out-of-town relatives and friends 
rose from 59 to 63 per cent between 
1962 and 1972, but personal visits 
dropped from 70 per cent to 58 per 
cent. A survey by the Bell System 
also found that, in the last decade, 
the number of people who make 
more than a dozen long distance 
calls a year rose from six to 11 
percent. 

If you're sailing for Europe this 
winter, keep your eyes peeled for 
icebergs. The American 
Geographic Society expects bet- 
ween 600 and 700 will be sighted 
near shipping lanes, nearly twice 
the yearly average of 365. There 
were 1,012 sighted in 1912, the year 
the Titanic sank. After breaking off 
from their glacier bases, the bergs 
take three years to reach shipping 
zones. The average berg then 
weighs about 150,000 tons, about 
one-tenth its original weight. 

Quotable Notables: "For a man 
to pretend to understand women is 
bad manners; for him to really 
understand them is bad morals." - 
Henry James. 

Forgotten heroes: Without 
taking a drink, Akim Akintola, 24, 
6f <K N1geria, ate 30 packages of 
potato chips in 29 minutes, 50 
seconds, in Manchester, England, 
on Feb. 28, 1965. 

Worth remembering: "Money 
won't buy love, but it'll sure put a 
guy in a mighty good bargaining 
position." 

It was Arthur "Bugs" Baer who 
observed, "A good neighbor is a 
fellow who smiles at you over the 
back fence but doesn't climb over 
it." 



Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Rainbow Festival 



Here Tomorrow 




John Hartford 



A Whole Bunch Of Banjo 



He picks a whole bunch of banjo. He plays hypnotic fiddle. He creates magic with a six 
string guitar. He's been reviewed as "the only lyricist in current popular music who's fit to 
be called a poet'' and classified in print as being "among the Renaissance men of con- 
temporary pop music." Sophistocated word man, dry humorist, artist, poet, riverboat hand- 
he's JOHN HARTFORD, "the best me I know how to be." 

A BRIEF HISTORY: Born in New York City, raised in St. Louis by a doctor father and a 
painter mother. Got his first banjo (beat up, no head) at ten. Learned to play banjo, fiddle, 
dobro and guitar in that chronology and preference. 

Before becoming a session musician in Nashville, John worked as a sign painter, com- 
mercial artist, riverboat deckhand on the Mississippi, and a disc jockey. His Nashville 
sessions led to a contract with RCA, for whom he eventually cut eight albums before signing 
with Warner Brothers in 1971. 

Tom Smothers heard one of these albums and flew John to Hollywood to write songs and 
dialogue and perform on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and the Summer Brothers 
Smothers Show. That led to John's long association with the Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, 
a good move for both Glen and John. Glen recorded a song of John's, "Gentle On My Mind," 
which was Glen's first giant hit, the song which put both of them on the map. "Gentle On My 
Mind" won three Grammies and became the most recorded song in the world for two con- 
secutive years. 

ABOUT HIS MUSIC: John's early banjo style was strongly influenced by Earl Scruggs, 
and his overall orientation was country, developed and refined through years of listening to 
and picking with the cream of Nashville musicians. But John is not a "See An' Double-yew" 
star. "I'm also a long-hair, and fairly liberal, so I don't know. I was just thinking the other 
day. it's a combination, like bluegrass and rock. So maybe it's grass-rock or something." 

Just as John's music is not limited by any particular label, neither is his audience limited 
by any particular age group or musicial taste. He generates a high degree of excitement 
wherever he plays, be it on a college campus, in a sophistocated night club or for a group of 
Grand Ole Opry fans. 

While John is a highly skilled, creative musician, his skill as a lyricist is just as great. His 
lyrics are clean, sharply etched pictures of his own experiences, and as such cover a vast 
range of topics and create a kaleidoscope of moods and emotions. And whatever the mood, 
whatever the topic, there is always present in his lyrics the perspective created by his 
humor-dry, subtle, tongue in cheek, earthy. 

If you think of John Hartford as the banjo player on the Glen Campbell show, or as the 
author of "Gentle On My Mind," it's time you gave yourself the opportunity to broaden that 
view. Today he is performing as himself, John Hartford, fine musician, excellent lyricist, 
creative human being. Listen to his latest album, "Morning Bugle," and next time he's in 
your area, go hear him. You'll be glad you did. 

Appearing with John at most of his engagements will be NORMAN BLAKE, one of the top 
three flat pickers in the country. Norman, an inscrutable master guitarist, has recorded 
with, among others, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Kris Kristofferson and Johnny Cash, and has 
just released an album of his own, "Norman Blake," on Rounder Records. 



The Rainbow Festival is a 
multiarts celebration that will take 
place at the University of 
Massachusetts Campus Center on 
Wednesday, August 1. Films, 
Crafts, Music, Art and Dance will 
be interwoven into a fascinating 
pattern of colorful events. Films, 
such as Chaplin's The Tramp and 
Greta Garbo's Mata Hari will be 
shown continuously from 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. Weavers, Potters, 
Silversmiths, Sculptors, Jewelry 
Designers and Painters will 
exhibit, demonstrate and talk 
about their craft. In the Campus 
Center Music Listening Room on 
the 2nd level there will be a drum 
making workshop with Baba Femi 
Akinlana from New York City 
showing how drums are made and 
telling about their origin. At 12 
noon right outside on the concourse 
Mr. Walter Chesnut, from the 
University's music department 
will give a horn demonstration and 
talk about the history and 
development of European horns. 
At this point people will be able to 
take their lunch out to the open air 
cafe area of the coffee shop to 
listen to "Los Hermanos Santiago" 
(The Santiago Brothers), Jaime 
and Ismael backed by Ruben and 
Fernanco on Spanish guitars sing 
the songs of Latin America and the 
Caribbean and with explanations 
in English. Following them will be 
the poets Irma McLaurin, Bill 
Hasson and Zoe Best who will be 
reading their works between 2 and 
3 p.m. At 4 p.m. on the 3rd level of 
the Campus Center Hotel in the 
outdoor area a group called Omo 
Lucumi from New York City will 
do African and Latin drumming 
and dancing. That will be followed 
by the Masque Ensemble's 
Children's Theater Open 
Rehearsal in the Music Listening 
Room at 5:30 p.m. To highlight the 
activities on Rainbow Day will be a 
Folk music concert at 6:30 starring 
John Hartford; Matthew and 
Peter; and Bill Staines on 
Metawampe Lawn behind the Blue 
Wall. All events are free and open 
to the public. It is suggested that 
people dress appropriately for cool 
summer evenings and bring 
blankets to lay in the grass for the 
evening concert. 



Omo Lucumi 
- Drummers 



Rainbow Day on Wednesday, 
August 1 brings us Omo Lucumi 
from NYC. Omo Lucumi is a group 
of New Yorkers who have 
dedicated themselves to upholding 
and preserving the rhythmic art of 
African drumming. The group is 
made up of professional drummers 
who have played with such notable 
musicians such as Michael 
Olatunji, Harry Belafonte and Max 
Roach. The group has been playing 
together for the last six years in 
cities like New York, Boston and 
Pittsburgh. 

At 11 a.m. they will do a drum 
making workshop in the Music 
Listening Room across from the 
Bookstore in the Campus Center 
Concourse (2nd level). 

At 4 p.m. they will perform on 
the Hotel level of the Campus 
Center outside. In case of in- 
clement weather they will perform 
in the Campus Center Auditorium 
Admission is free and open to the 
public. 




RAINBOW DAY FILM FESTIVAL 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN SILENTS AND "THE TRAMP" (Chaplin's Best) 

this is the first film made by Chaplin in which pathos was evident and the first one to end 
on a note of sadness. It is a classic. 

MATA HARI (with Greta Garbo) 

Garbo in her most highly stylized period. The amoral world of espionage is the perfect 
setting for the most elemental of sexual conflicts ; and rarely has the Delilah myth been 
treated so sympathetically. 

THE MIME OF MARCEL MARCEAU 

the unique French pantomimist in a fascinating film about the art. 

BALLET WITH EDWARD VILLELA 

the New York Ballet Company with the entire company, starring Edward Villela and 
Patricia McBride dance to George Balanchine's Apollo and Jewels. 

THE SYMPHONY SOUND 

Henry Lewis and the Royal Philharmonic of London express an infinite spectrum of ideas, 
sentiments and moods in pieces by a variety of composers from varied periods. 



FILM SCHEDULE 

**************** 



Time 



Film 



9a.m. The Symphony of Sound 

9:30 a.m. Ballet of Edward Villela 

9:55 a.m. Mime of Marcel Marceau 

10:15 a.m. Presenting Charlie Chaplin 

ll:15a.m. Mata Hari 

12:45p.m. The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) 

1:50 p.m. Mata Hari 
(The Omo Lucumi, African Drums and Dance will be in the Auditorium from 3:45-5:30 
p.m.) 

6 p.m. Mata Hari 

************************************** 



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Rainbow Day Events 

Crafts & Sale-All Day-Campus Center Concourse 

Film Festival-9 a.m. -7 p.m. -Campus Center 
Auditorium 

Drum Making Workshop-li-12 noon-Music 
Listening Room 

Walter Chesnut (Horn Demonstration)-12 noon-1 
p.m. -Campus Center Concourse 

Jaime Santiago & the Latin American Singers 1 
p.m. -2 p.m. -Outdoor Cafe Area in Coffee Shop 
(if rain: Music Listening Room) 

Poetry Heading 2 p.m. -3 p m.-Cafe Area in Coffee 
Shop (if rain: Music Listening Room) 

Omo Lucumi African Percussion & Dance-4 p.m.- 
5:30 p.m-Campus Center Hotel 3rd Level 
outdoors (in case of rain Campus Center 
Auditorium) 

Floyd Baily-Masque Children's Theater-5:30 p.m- 
7 p.m. -Music Listening Koom 

Folk Concert: John Hartford, Bill Staines, Mat- 
thew & Peter-6:30 p.m 930 p.m. -Metawampe 
Lawn (if rain, Student Union Ballroom) 



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Discoverers 
of Essence 

On Rainbow Day, Wednesday, 
August 1 Irma McLaurin, Bill 
Hasson and Zoe Best will read 
from their work in the outdoor cafe 
area of the Coffee Shop in the 
Campus Center at the University of 
Massachusetts at 2 p.m. Each poet 
will read poetry written from their 
own varied and unique ex- 
periences, cultural and historical. 

Sister Irma McLaurin, who was 
born in Chicago began writing 
when she was nine. She developed 
her own philosophy of writing after 
coming in contact with poets such 
as Gwendolyn Brooks, Don L. Lee 
and Carolyn Rogers. This summer 
after graduating from Grennill in 
Iowa, Ms. McLaurin matriculated 
in the Masters of Fine Arts 
program at the University of 
Massachusetts in Amherst. Her 
first publication, "Black Chicago", 
was published recently in New 
York City. 

Zoe Best was born into a family 
that due to the economic situation 
in the 50's led a nomadic life. Her 
experiences range from picking 
fruit in California orchards as a 
child laborer, to traveling ex- 
tensively as a student in 
Guatemala, being a social activist 
for the rights of Spanish speaking, 
poor white and Native American 
peoples, to being the head of the 
household and mother of four 
children. Ms. Best has been 
published in newspapers, 
magazines and most important has 
worked on the development of the 
Every woman's Center book of 
women poets, Voices of New 
Women. 

Brother Bill Hasson, director of 
the Black Cultural Center in New 
Africa House and the moving force 
behind such programs as the Third 
World Series of the Fine Arts 
Council and the Black Musician's 
Conference will read from woffe 
constructed on the African ex- 
perience in the United States. Mr. 
Hasson, who is from Illinois, has 
spent most of his life working with 
Black and Puerto Rican youth. He 
is presently working on his doc- 
torate at the University. Much of 
his work (poetry, essays, 
readings) have been published or 
recorded by a variety of 
newspapers, magazines and 
companies. Mr. Hasson can be 
heard on WFCR radio on the Black 
Mass Communications program, 
African Rhythms. 



■ fli 



i 4 



Los Hermanos 
Santiago 55 



Jaime Santiago and his brother 
Ismael were born in Corosol, 
Puerto Rico. They have been 
singing together since they were 
fifteen years old. The songs they 
sing, accompanied by Spanish 
guitars, tell the history and the 
tales of the Spanish speaking 
people of Latin America and the 
Caribbean. The Santiago brothers 
backed by Francisco Santiago and 
Ruben Otero will sing at the 
Rainbow Festival, in the outdoor 
cafe area of the coffee shop at 1 : 00 
p.m. on Wednesday, August 1st. 
They will be followed by poets. 
Irma McLaurin, Zoe Best, and Bill 
Hasson at 2:00 p.m. At 3:30 p.m. on 
the Campus Center Hotel level 
there will be African drumming 
and dance performed by Omo 
Lucumi. In case of rain, Omo 
Lucumi will be in the Campus 
Center Auditorium. All events are 
free. 




Matthew & Peter 

When people come back three nights in a row to hear the same concert you know it must 
have been a great concert. When people stay long past midnight to listen, you know they 
were listening to a great concert. When the performers receive encore after encore and the 
audience won't let them leave, you know it was a great concert. 

With flute, guitar and song Matthew and Peter have cast many a magical musical spell 
upon their audience. They take the audience on a trip through the music of lullabies, to the 
exciting beat of Exorcism, to the lively hand clapping "Smiles". When they play at the 
Rainbow Day Festival Folk Concert at the University of Massachusetts on August 1, we 
expect the audience to be entranced. 

Most of their songs were written by Matthew, a man who writes with talent and sen- 
sitivity. The three of them, Matthew, Peter and their bass player, Jonathan blend the 
sounds of their instruments to produce a unique and enchanting kind of music. The Folk 
concert at which John Hartford and Bill Staines will also be featured will take place at the 
University of Massachusetts' Metawampe Lawn at 6:30 p.m. In case of inclement weather 
the concert will take place in the Student Union Ballroom. Admission is free, although, if the 
concert is indoors summer students with UMass identification will be seated first. 



************************************** 



Horn Demonstration 



Walter Chesnut, Associate Professor of Music at UMass, will present a horn demon- 
stration at the Rainbow Festival tomorrow at noon in the CC Concourse. Mr. Chesnut will 
perform and talk about the history of the instrument as part of this multi-arts fair. 

Walter Chesnut received his Bachelor of Music Degree from the University of Michigan in 
1958 and his Master of Music Degree from that same institution in 1959. He was a member of 
the marching and symphony band, under the direction of William D. Revelli, from 1954-59. 
In 1958, '59 and again in 1966, Mr. Chesnut was solo cornet with the University of Michigan 
Symphony Band and was a teaching fellow on trumpet. In 1959 he was soloist before the 
National Band Directors Conference in Chicago, Illinois. While at Michigan he was a 
student of Clifford P. Lillya. 

From 1959 to 1962 Mr. Chesnut was band director (grades 4-12) in Colon, Michigan and 
from 1962-1966 he was junior high band and orchestra director in Sturgis, Michigan. His 
bands and orchestras were consistent first division winners in district and state com- 
petition. 

In 1966 Mr. Chesnut returned to the University of Michigan to start work on a Doctor of 
Musical Arts Degree in Trumpet. Mr. Chesnut was a clinician, soloist, and adjudicator 
throughout Indiana and Michigan while living in the mid-west. 

Active in all branches of music, Mr. Chesnut is a member of Kappa, Kappa Psi, Phi Mu 
Alpha, and Pi Kappa Lambda music fraternities and societies. He is past president of 
District 11 Michigan School Band and Orchestra Association and past 2nd Vice President of 
the State M.S.B.O.A. Association. He was selected for membership in the American School 
Band Directors Association in 1966. 

Mr. Chesnut has been active as a soloist and clinician since he arrived in the East. He has 
conducted All Star Bands in Massachusetts and Vermont, and has served as a clinician at 
the Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire All-State conferences. 

Mr. Chesnut has been a member of seven symphony orchestras and is presently the 
principal trumpet in the Springfield Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held since 1967. 
In 1970 he toured Europe with the University of Massachusetts Chorale as soloist and 
member of the Brass Trio. His duties at the University of Massachusetts include all applied 
trumpet lessions, and he is Director of the Brass Choir. He is a member of the faculty brass 
trio and is an active performer on and off campus. 



Page 6— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Fifth Weekend At Tanglewood 



TANGLEWOOD, LENOX - The 

fifth weekend at Tanglewood 
begins 7:00 p.m. on Friday, August 
3 with the Weekend Prelude con- 
cert featuring the Tanglewood 
Festival Chorus, John Oliver 
conductor. Mr. Oliver opens the 
program with Schutz' "Cantate 
Domino canticum novum" for four 
voices; follows with G. Gabrielli's 
"Cantate Domino canticum 
novum" in six parts; next J. S. 
Bach's "Komm, Jesu, komm" 
motet; then Wolf's "Sechs 
geistliche Lieder nach Gedichten 
von Joseph von Eichendorff"; and 
closes the program with Brahms' 
"Funf Lieder". 

At 9:00 p.m. Principal Guest 
conductor Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts the Orchestra in 
Beethoven's Symphony no. 7 in A 
and Copland's Symphony no. 3. 

On Saturday, August 4 at 10:30 
a.m., as on every Saturday mor- 
ning throughout the Tanglewood 



season, there will be an Open 
Rehearsal of works to be per- 
formed on Sunday. 

On Saturday evening at 8:30 
p.m., Michael Tilson Thomas 
conducts tne orchestra in an all- 
Stravinsky program beginning 
with Suite from 'L'oiseau de feu' 
and "Canticum sacrum ad 
honorem Sancti Marci nominus" 
with Kenneth Riegel tenor, David 
Evitts bass and the Tanglewood 
Festival Chorus, John Oliver 
conductor. The concert continues 
with J. S. Bach's "Choral- 
variationen uber das Weinacht- 
slied 'Vom Himmel hoch da komm 
'ich her' ' "arranged by Igor 
Stravinsky (its first performance 
at the Berkshire Festival). Mr. 
Thomas closes the concert with 
Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms 
with the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, John Oliver conductor. 

On Sunday, August 5 at 2:30 
p.m., Michael Tilson Thomas 



T0NITE 



CCA 



FREE 




Silent Film Classics 
Buster Keaton 

in 

"The General" 

Rudolph Valentino 

in 

"Blood and Sand" 

featuring 

Victor Catok 

on piano 



conducts the Orchestra in Mozart's 
German Dances and follows it with 
Cage's Suite for toy piano, or- 
chestrated by Lou Harrison. This is 
the first performance of this work 
by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra. Mr. Thomas continues the 
program with Stauss' Till 
Eulenspiegel and closes the con- 
cert with Brahms' Piano concerto 
no. 2 in B flat.with Malcolm Frager 
soloist. 
PROGRAM 
WEEKEND V 
Friday, August 3, 1973 

Shed 

7:00 p.m. Weekend Prelude 

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL 
CHORUS John Oliver, conductor 

Schutz: 'Cantate Domino can- 
ticum novum' for four voices 

G. Gabrieli: 'Cantate Domino 
canticum novum' in six parts 

Bach: Komm, Jesu, komm, 
motet 

Wolf: Sechs geistliche Lieder 
nach Gedichten von Joseph von 
Eichendorff 

Brahms: Funf Lieder 

9:00 p.m. 

Shed 

MICHAEL TILSON THOMAS 
conductor 

Beethoven: Symphony no. 7 in A 

Copland: Symphony no. 3 
Saturday, August 4 

10:30 a.m. 

Shed 

BOSTON SYMPHONY OR- 
CHESTRA OPEN REHEARSAL 

8:30 p.m. 



Shed 

MICHAEL TILSON THOMAS 

conductor 
KENNETH RIEGEL tenor 
DAVID EVITTS baritone 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL 

CHORUS John Oliver, conductor 
Stravinsky: Suite from 'L'oiseau 

de feau' 
Canticum sacrum 
Bach-Stravinsky: Choral - 

variationen uber das Weinacht- 

slied 'Vom Himmel hoch da komm 

'ich her' ' 
Stravinsky: Symphony of 

Psalms 

Sunday, August 5 
2:30 p.m. 
Shed 
MICHAEL TILSON THOMAS 

conductor 
MALCOM FRAGER piano 
Mozart: German dances 
Cage: Suite for toy piano 
Strauss: Till Eulenspiegel 
Brahms: Piano concerto no. 2 in 

B flat 

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TANGLEWOOD, LENOX - On 

Tuesday, August 14 at 8:30 p.m., 
the combined Boston Symphony 
and Berkshire Music Center Or- 
chestras present the annual 
Tanglewood-on-Parade Gala 
concert. The grounds open at 2:00 
in the afternoon and, beginning at 
2:30, mini-concerts will be 
presented throughout the af- 
ternoon by members of the 
Berkshire Music Center. The 
annual Tanglewood-on-Parade 
celebration is a fine opportunity for 
listeners to understand better just 
what goes on during the eight 
weeks of the Berkshire Music 
Center, this country's oldest 
summer music school for ad- 
vanced students and 
preprofessionals. 

The GALA concerts, at 8:30 p.m. 
in the Shed at Tanglewood, this 
year presents a mixed bag of 
material. The concert opens with 
Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait, 
conducted by Artistic Director 
Gunther Schuller, played by the 
Boston Symphony and narrated by 
Granrud Artist-in-Residence 
Andre Watts. The Liszt Piano 
concerto no. 1 in E flat follows, 
with Seiji Ozawa, Artistic Director 
of the Berkshire Festival and 
Music Director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra conducting 
that Orchestra with Andre Watts 
as soloist. Then the concert takes a 
new turn - Gunther Schuller 
conducts members of the 
Berkshire Music Center in works 
by Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton 
and Duke Ellington. The Berkshire 
Music Center Orchestra under the 
direction of Seiji Ozawa follows 
with Strauss' Also sprach 
Zarathustra and the concert closes 
with Tchaikovsky's Italien 
capriccio performed by the 
combined Boston Symphony and 
Berkshire Music Center Or- 
chestras under the direction of 
Gunther Schuller. 



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Notices 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



UMASS 
OUTING CLUB TRIPS 

Tuesday, 31 July, Introductory 

Rock Climbing in Rattlesnake 

Gutter, (mostly reppeling), leaves 

at 5:30 p.m. from the CC bus circle 

in front of Stockbridge Hall. 
•** 

Thursday, 2 August, Canoeing on 
the Connecticut River Oxbow, 
leaves at 5:30 p.m. from the CC bus 

circle in front of Stockbridge Hall. 

•*• 

Outing Club Equipment Room 
hours are from 11:50 a.m. to 1:00 
p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, only. If you want to get 
equipment at other times, you will 
have to make special 
arrangements. Check the sign on 
the door to find out how to make 
these arrangements. 

Check OC Bulletin Board for 
trips and trip signup sheets and 
equipment reservations. Equip- 
ment Room and Bulletin Board are 
located opposite the ticket office on 

the first floor of the Student Union. 

*** 

The Student Union Art Gallery is 
presently exhibiting an essay-in- 
phot ographs on the life of Sigmund 
Freud. This collection of 135 
photographs, the earliest of which 
was taken in 1864, is accompanied 
by a 10 page brochure of ex- 
planatory notes on the sequence of 
pictures. Included in the exhibit 
are photographs from the private 
collection of Dr. Anna Freud, such 
as the picture in the kiosk across 
from the University Store on the 
Concourse of the Campus Center. 
This shows Sigmund Freud with 
his daughter Anna at Den Haag 
during the 6th Psychoanalytical 
Congress in 1920. Many of his 
personal papers and documents 
have also been photographed and 
appear. 

The exhibit, sponsored by the 
Summer Activities Program, is 
from the Goethe Institute in 
Boston, Mass. The Gallery, located 
on the first floor of the Student 
Union, is open: Monday-Friday, 10 
a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday & Thursday, 

7 p.m. -5 p.m. 

*•» 

The Art Corridor, located next to 
the Student Union Ballroom, is 
currently occupied by the cartoons 
of Mr. Stan Hunt of the Springfield 
Union newspaper. Mr. Hunt, who is 
primarily a sports cartoonist, has 
supplied nineteen original 
drawings, complete with rough 
edges and editing comments, 
which depict the Western New 
England sports scene. This exhibit 
will remain in the Art Corridor 
until the end of summer school and 
is sponsored by the Summer Ac- 
tivities Program. 

*** . 

SMALL CLAIMS COURT 
ADVISORY SERVICE 

A Small Claims Court Advisory 
service will be available to those 
people interested in or having 
questions or problems pertaining 
to the nature and function of the 
Small Claims Court. This service 
will be offered by John Lynn, who 
will be located in the WMPIRG 
(Western Mass. Public Interest 



Classifieds 

FOR SALE 

TEAC 3300 brand new stereo deck, dual 1218 
auto changer, SONY TC 55 port, cassette, 
Eico 427 oscilloscope. Call Adam, 253 5171. 

t 7/31 

For Sale 1967 Chev. Bel Air, gd cond., 3 
spd, new clutch, $150 Call 549 1332 before 3 

p.m. 

te/2 



For Sale 1969 Yamaha 305 cc, excellent 
cond , J300. Call 256 8104 after 6 p m. 

1 8/2 

Stereo speakers creative model 8815, 3 yrs. 
left on warranty, SllO/pr. or B. O , also BSR 
8 track tape player for home, »25. 256 6633. 

1 7/31 

Zenith B&W TV S25, womans 3 speed bike, 
*30, mans 3 sp. bike, *30, end tables, student 
desk & chair, 2 dressers, lw/mirror 256 
6045 

te/2 

WANTED 

Student experienced in Joing tech inking 
and/or drafting on a reg part time hourly 
basis. Phone Mrs. Camus at 5 2008 

7/26,7/31,8/2 



Research Group) office, 2nd floor 
Student Union from 11 :30 a.m. to 1 
p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays, commencing on 
August 1, and ending on August 15. 
The booklet "How To Sue In Small 
Claims Court", 'as well as other 
literature will be available to those 
interested. For further information 
contact WMPIRG Regional Office, 
Amherst, 256-6434. 



»»* 



"Top Hat", originally scheduled 
for Mahar Auditorium, August 2, 
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. has been changed 
to a double feature in the Student 
Union Ballroom. The Amherst 
Film Coop will sponsor "Play It 
Again Sam" at 7 p.m., "Top Hat" 
at 8:30 and "Play It Again, Sam" 
played again at 10:15. The ad- 
mission price of 75$ buys you both 
films, on August 2. 

Christian Science College 
Organization warmly invites you to 
its weekly meeting at 6:45 p.m. 
every Tuesday. Come and hear the 
Truth that heals. See Campus 
Center Calendar for room number. 



U.S. Rep. Michael J. Harrington 
(D-Mass. ) has introduced "truth in 
energy" legislation to encourage 
energy conservation by requiring 
manufacturers and retailers to 
post energy efficiency and usage 
costs for all energy-consuming 
appliances. 

Under the bill, consumers would 
be able to determine the true cost 
of appliances, automobiles and 
other products in terms of energy 
consumption and efficiency. All 
packages, contracts, and price 
tags would list the energy cost, in 
dollars and cents, as well as the 
product's purchase price. The bill 
also empowers the Federal Trade 
Commission to place an "inef- 
ficient energy consumption" 
warning on labels and ad- 
vertisements of all products that 
do not meet minimum efficiency 
standards. 

Citing President Nixon's call for 
a 5 per cent nationwide reduction 
in energy demand, Harrington 
asserted that his measure would 
"provide consumers with the in- 
formation they need to make in- 
telligent, energy-conserving 
product choices." 

"Even the oil industry is now 



"Truth In Energy" 



calling for energy conservation," 
the Massachusetts Congressman 
said, "but no one has told the 
average citizen just how to do it. 
With a clear marking of the energy 
cost of appliances the purchaser 
can save money and energy at the 
same time." 

Under Harrington's energy 
efficiency labelling bill, the FTC 
would determine minimum 



product efficiency standards for 
each region of the country, so that 
goods not meeting those standards 
could be clearly identified on price 
tags and advertisements. 

"It is time to translate con- 
servation and energy crisis 
rhetoric into practical programs to 
aid consumers," Harrington said. 
"This bill would give citizens a 
readily available weapon 




1| 1( AMHERST'S gJkV DEPARTMENT STORE?/ 

Denim Skirts $6.95 
Halters from $2.95 

(rMEXTTOTHE POSf OFFICE ON N. REASANTST/jl 



Crossword Puzzle 



Answer to Yesterday s Puzzle 



ACROSS 

1 Walk wearily 
6 Collect 

1 1 Part of eye 

12 Soup dish 

14 Part of "to be" 

15 Makes into 

leather 

17 Biblical weed 

18 Stroke 
20 Crown 

23 Cravat 

24 Short jacket 
26 Gross 

28 Paid notice 

29 Lassos 

31 Clears away 
33 Heroic tale 

35 Transaction 

36 Chastises 
39 Pamphlet 

42 Spanish article 

43 Music: slow 

45 Heavenly body 

46 Swiss river 
48 European er- 
mine 

50 Period of time 

51 Dirk 
'53 A continent 

55 Note of scale 

56 Occupant 
59 Marine snail 

61 Turkic tribes- 

man 

62 Surgical thread 

DOWN 

1 Vegetable 

2 Railroad (abbr. 

3 Emmet 

4 Flesh 

5 Sudden fright 

6 Near 



7 Greek letter 

8 Skill 

9 Chair 

10 Continued 

story 

11 Frolic 
13 Wants 
16 Sardonyx 

19 Heavy drinker 

21 Foray 

22 Item of proper- 
ty 

25 Country of Asia 
27 Masts 
30 Locations 
32 Puff up 
34 Coin 

36 Animal 

37 Kite 

38 Portico 



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41 Retinue 
44 Kilns 

47 Rockfish 
49 Weary 
52 Dine 



54 River island 

57 A continent 

(abbr.) 

58 Initials of 26th 

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60 Preposition 







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Page a— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Bicycle Race Wednesday Evening 




Start of last year's IM Bike Race. 



Franchi At Storrotvton 



WEST SPRINGFIELD - The 

ruggedly handsome Sergio 
Franchi joins with his sister Dana 
Valery and comic Corbett Monica 
for a week of musn. and mirth at 
Storrowton Theatre "The Sergio 
Franchi Show"' opens its six day 
run on August 6. 

Franchi's roots tie him to 
Cremona. Italy, where his vocal 
training began. His family 
migrated to South Africa, and 
shortly thereafter Franchi signed 
as the lead in touring operas and 
operettas. 

Extensive travel and intensive 
opera study followed. A "final" 
guest appearance on a British 
variety show found Franchi for- 
saking the classical arias and 
turning to a selection from 
"Kismet". This was all it took for 
the tenor to be "discovered". Ed 
Sullivan introduced Sergio Franchi 
to American television audiences 
in what Franchi calls his "moment 
of truth". 

America's top supper-clubs 
featured the new "find" and found 
that Franchi's name meant 
capacity crowds. Combining a 
suave European manner and a rich 
tenor voice, Sergio Franchi wows 
audiences by, in his own words, 
"doing my own thing." 

Proof positive for heredity ex- 
perts in his "baby sister" singer 
Dana Valery. Born in South Africa, 
she pursued a career as a court 
interpreter. Big brother prodded 
and soon the only translation on 
her mind was the written word into 
song. 

Her husky, sexy tones have 
made her a favorite of late-night 



Creation 

Antiques 

the finest in 



television shows. Whether singing 
"For Once In My Life" or her own 
creation, "I'm A Woman Now", 
Dana Valery does her brother 
proud. 

Corbett Monica adds comedy to 
the evening. After a successful 
stint as Joey Bishop's sidekick on 
Bishop's TV series, Monica began 
a much-praised nightclub tour. 

Armed with a deadpan delivery 
and a polished sense of timing, 
Monica is a frequent guest host on 
"The Tonight Show ". One reviewer 
noted that Corbett Monica can 
"transform a laughing audience 
into an hysterical crowd." 

Tickets for the triple treat 
provided by "The Sergio Franchi 
Show" are on sale at the 
Storrowton box office located on 
the grounds of the Eastern States 
Exposition at the site of the orange 
and blue tent. 

Box office hours are from 10 to 
10, Monday through Saturday, and 
from 1 to 5 on Sundays. Telephone 
reservations may be made by 
calling 732-1101 in the Greater 
Springfield area, or 522-5211 in the 
Greater Hartford area. 




■ 

i 



'ft'"' 



Amherst's Tire Store- 
Firestone Shell Jetzon 

Veith IlRELLI 



MICHELIN X 

le Hovre Rodial Tires 




Steel Belted 



Professional American A 
Foreign Car Repair 




1 tm HS 

n PLAZA SHELL m> 



clothes 
jewelry 
glass 



etcetera 



Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy « trade, too. 



t.wtn. 



Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 

OPEN 24 HOURS 



mm 



Wfv.C. 



This Wednesday evening marks the final single event scheduled by the 
Intramural Office with a bicycle race around the Stadium. The race, 
which will begin at 7:00 p.m. will have two divisions, one for men and one 
for women. The men's race will be 1.7 miles; the women's, 1 mile. 

Softball and volleyball are also coming to a close. Last week the Misfits 
won the Co-Rec Softball title, Bound Upward won the Co-Rec volleyball 
championship, and the Big Sticks won a three team playoff to capture the 
Men's Volleyball award. Men's softball ends this week. 



* * 



Important Notice: Individual sport participants must play their games 
as soon as possible. Scores for all scheduled matches must be turned into 
the IM Office by noon August 6th in order to arrange playoffs. 

Softball Standings As Of 7/26 




August 2, 1973 



Urn. ersity of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 12 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 

1. Bio Psych 5-1 

2. Big Sticks 5-1 

3. Misfits 5-1 

4. Pipefitters 4-2 

5. Watergate 3-3 

6. Swine 2-4 

7. Civil 2-4 

8. NAPC 2-4 

9. Batmen 2-4 

10. PROFS 0-6 

No longer in the league. 

Scheduled opponents will 
win by forfeit. 

CO-REC SOFTBALL 

1. Misfits 5-1 

(Champions) 

2. Immorril 3-3 

3. Upward Bound 2-4 

4. Swine 1-5 

CO-REC VOLLEYBALL 

1. Bound Upward 3-1 

(Champions) 

2. Upward Bound 2-2 

3. CCEBS 2-2 

4. No Team 1-3 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Plumbers 6-0 

Education 4-2 

Ringers 4-2 

Ashcan 3-3 

5. P.S.E. 3-3 

6. Dishrags 3-3 

7. Immorril 3-3 

8. Shamrocks 2-4 

9. Sissies 2-4 

10. CCEBS 0-6 
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL 

1. Big Sticks 5-1 

(Champions) 

2. CCEBS 3-2 

3. Galahad 3-2 

4. P.S.E. 1-4 

5. Pipefitters 0-5 







Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

MOM-SAT. 10:00-8:00 T«»l«»r%»»«„~ co* «n«, 

TMURS.iFRi. til 9:00 'elephone 586-3727 

SALE 

USED JEANS 2for $ 3 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 

2 for *2 

2 for *6 

75 e 

2 for $ 3 



WORK SHIRTS 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 

USED VESTS 




ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS s 7«° »«■»»«» 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 




Some of the approximately 250 people who turned out Tuesday at noon for a rally on the steps of the Student Union to protest hikes in the parking fee. Below, Carol 
Drew, President of Local 1776 AFL-CIO, addresses the rally. 





WEDNESDAY 
NIGHT 



Returns 
to The Pub 



WEDNESDAY 
NIGHT 




Statement Of The UMass Employees Association 



Under the slogans of "improving 
traffic safety," "dealing with air 
pollution" and "stopping th ten- 
dency to pave over the campus," 
"the Administration of the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst is trying to give their 
Parking Fee plan, which is being 
opposed by campus organizations, 
the status of an ecology crusade. 
Such hypocracy! The fact is that 
their Parking Fee Plan will not 
decrease the number of parking 
spaces in "the central campus- 
they are not tearing up any "core" 
lots (which, under the new system, 
are the greatest money makers). 
Thus, there will be the same traffic 
going to those spaces as currently. 
So much for high-sounding concern 
over traffic and air pollution. 

In fact, the Administration is in 
the process of building more 
parking lots. Here is the deception. 
Not only is their claims of concern 
over a "green" campus shown to be 
phony-because they are paving 
over more of it, but also, one-third 
of those new lots are being built to 
accommodate the dislocations 



which will result in a few years 
when the University closes North 
Pleasant St., thereby making 
several current parking lots 
inaccessable. See pages XXI-14 
and A-38,6 of the Draft En- 
vironmental Impact Statement for 
the Northeast By-Pass Road, 
Amherst-Hadley (Rept. FHWA- 
Mass-EXS-72-33-D). Claims of 



3,300 new spaces then, are 
misleading. Since these lots are 
bing built now, presumably from 
the $13,000 surplus from last years 
fees, then the necess of new in- 
creases is highly questionable, 
also, not to mention the propriety 
of employees having to construct 
state facilities with their own 
money. 



WMUfl Meetin g Toda y 



L 



There will be a meeting 
today at four o'clock in room 
163 Campus Center to discuss 
the Governor's proposed 
reorganization of higher 
education. If you can't make it, 
WMUA, 91.1 FM, will cover the 
meeting live starting at 3:45. 
Art Cohen will be there to cover 
the proceedings and provide 
background information and 
commentary. That's today at 
3: 45 on WMUA, stereo 91.1 FM 



Welcome (Tomorrow) Brookly, 



'Senior Year- 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



g The" 

Crier 



The Criar is a semi weekly publication of the Summer session 1773, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Steve Tripoli 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 



Stephen G.Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 




o 

t 

01 



a 
6 

o 

*- 

£ 

Q. 

w 
<u 

w 
U 



If you had to wear a fur coat all 
summer like Sam does, you'd 
enjoy a few beers every now and 
then, too. Sam just can't wait for 
the last edition of the Crier to 
happen so he can get high during 
the day instead of just at night. 



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Crier Quiz 




Here's today's Mystery Person, a well known 
American. The hint is that she's not Shenouda III, 
the Coptic patriarch, although we thank him for the 
hat. First person to make it to 402 Student Union and 
tell us who she is gets his/her picture in Thursday's 
Crier and a real big thrill. 



Here's Tuesday's contest win- 
ner, Bill Schweber of 10 Brittany 
Manor Apartments, a grad student 
in electrical engineering. He 
correctly guessed our dashing 
sheik as H. R." Haldeman. Since 
he's the second contest winner to 
come from Brittany Manor, and 
since our Editor-in-Chief lives 
there, the Crier extends to Brittany 
Manor it's first annual 
Distinguished Service award, for 
providing the Crier with service 
above the call of duty. Now will you 
buy an ad, Brittany? 




* 
* 



Ij:****************************** 



Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



A Sinking, Mismanaged Mess 



Looking at the controversy over the proposed 
parking fee hikes and looking in general at things 
around campus makes any person who's fairly aware 
of what's going on around here ask a simple question. 
To wit: Why are so many things on this campus 
mismanaged and messed up? 

The parking situation itself is a prime example. The 
original proposal was a total debauchery, and though 
they'll never say it publicly, the administration knew 
it. So they changed it, probably under the convenient 
guise of acceding to the wishes of the campus com- 
munity, to its present form. 

But the fact of the matter is that the whole proposal 
is still nothing moffe than a crock. Why it was cooked 
up in such a half assed way makes one wonder why 
people are getting paid to devise such things. It also 
makes one wonder why input from the community is 
treated with such disdain, privately if not publicly. 
Could the community possibly devise anything that 
serves less people fairly? 

The new proposal should contain concrete plans for 
making UMass a pedestrian campus. Student 
Government President Nick Apostola's suggestion 
that 6 lot not be fixed, but planted, is a good place to 
start (it appears to be one of the few sensible things 
he's said in the controversy of late, but we won't hold 
that against him). 

Most of us would not like to believe, despite our 
naturally adversary position, that the administration 
threw up a screen and, in fact, has deceived us to 
some extent on the proposal, but it appears to be true. 
But the parking problem can be saved yet. Some 
other cases of mismanagement will take a lot more 
work to salvage. 

A glowing example of the extent mismanagement 
can reach on this campus is none other than Joel 
Stoneham's Circus, Food Services. Not only has this 
operation lost better then ONE MILLION dollars in 
recent years, but to top it all off Mr. Stoneham has 
steadfastly resisted student input into his operation, 
claiming that students can't tell him anything since 
he's a professional and they're not. One wonders if 
non-professionals could do as proficient a job as Mr. 
Stoneham. It's not easy to lose better than $400,000 in 
one year, you know. You need a professional to do 
that. 

Joel Stoneham should be fired at the soonest 
possible moment and Food Services should be 
revamped. By the way, just as a postscript, meal 
ticket prices may take a big jump next January. They 
already cost more than the average person living off 
campus pays for food, from all I've been able to 
gather, and to top off the whole mess there is a lot of 
suspicion that Dining Commons meals are not 
nutritionally balanced. 



So to sum it all up, you're paying more for less, and 
you'll probably be paying more yet come January- 
and your nutritional needs aren't being met, in all 
probability. Don't you just love it? 

Yet another messed up ripoff is the Campus Center, 
which on top of all the revenue it produces still needs 
more than $50 from every student on campus this 
year to make the books balance. In case you have a 
tough time multiplying, that's better than $1.2 million 
bucks out of your pockets to keep the place going, and 
most students only use one floor in the whole com- 
plex. 

Chief culprit in this dilemma is Campus Center 
Manager Warren "Terry" Grinnan, whose work has 
been so well received that he has resigned, effective 
in the near future. Some of the back room dealings in 
Whitmore indicate that Mr. Grinnan was under heavy 
pressure from Vice Chancellor for Administrative 
Services Tom Campion to resign, the unspoken 
ultimatum being that he'd be canned anyway if he 
didn't. But that isn't the end of the Campus Center 
problem, unfortunately. Hopefully, the Campus 
Center Board of Governors, a student body, will be 
able to alleviate the situation to some extent. 

By the way, Tom Campion, the person who 
allegedly pressured Grinnan into resigning, isn't in 
line for any medals himself. One of the chief culprits 
in the parking mess, he has built himself the 
reputation of being one of Whitmore's worst ad- 
ministrators. That's like being the worst player on 
the Texas Rangers. 

Before I began looking into these things myself I 
used to wonder if so many people could be so bad. I 
used to think that maybe the Student Government 
was just being anti-every thing. But I was wrong. Joel 
Stoneham, Terry Grinnan, and many more people 
really are incompetent. They really are ripping you 
off for serious bucks. And the examples shown here 
are just the tip of the iceberg. There are other ripoffs, 
both financial and academic, and the academic ones 
are maybe the worst of all. With those you're getting 
ripped off for your education and your future. 

What's the answer? For one thing, more input from 
students and staff. Another may lie in a program 
that's been tried in Michigan, where professionals 
from the business world were brought into a lot of key 
positions at the University. Savings to date have been 
better than $3 million. The academic ripoffs can be 
solved, too. 

But don't doubt the authenticity of the gripes now. 
All this stuff is really coming down, and this campus 
is in danger of sinking. Let's hope we can save our 
money and our futures before it's too late. 

Steve Tripoli is Editor-in-Chief of the Crier and the 
Massachusetts Daily Collegian. 



Report Of The Select 
Committee On Goals 



NORTHERN AMHERST VILLAGE STUDY 

The Zoning Map Committee, a recently formed 
subcommittee of the Planning Board, and the Office 
of the Town Planner are conducting a comprehensive 
study of the northern section of Amherst. The study 
includes the villages of North Amherst and Cushman 
and is the first major step in the revision of the Zoning 
By-Law to reflect the recommendations of the Select 
Committee on Goals for Amherst. 

Evaluation of Northern Amherst will serve as a 
pilot study for the formulation of techniques and 
procedures required to implement the village con- 
cept. Cushman and North Amherst are the only 
villages within the Town which have not been 
analyzed previously. This fact, along with the great 
diversity of land and housing types and the existing 
development pattern, offers the study group an ex- 
traordinary planning challenge. 

The Office of the Town Planner will attempt to 
determine the pattern and nature of development 
which will best serve the future needs of the com- 
munity. Evaluation of the area will include the study 
of population characteristics, land use, traffic pat- 
terns, natural features, and the steps required to 
insure that the present personality of the community 
is maintained and enhanced. 

Morton B. Braun, President of The Planning 
Services Group, Inc. of Cambridge, has been engaged 
to advise the Zoning Map Committee and the Plan- 
ning Department. He will deal primarily with the 
technical aspects of using zoning as a tool to im- 
plement the concept of villages. In addition to his 
excellent professional credentials, Mr. Braun has 
impressed the planning group with his concise and 
imaginative suggestions for dealing with Amherst's 
unusual problems. 

The Zoning Map Committee hopes to involve 
citizens in the planning process and expects to hold 
public meetings in the Fall to provide the Northern 
Amherst community an opportunity to directly in- 
fluence its future. 

Members of the Zoning Map Committee are David 
Elder, Chairman, George Buczala, Allan Carpenter 
Steve Fletcher, Barbara Ford, Evelyn Goldenberg' 
Irving Howards, Arnold Rhodes, Robert Rikkers 



Richard Shumway, and Jennie Werbe. 
COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION 

During the past month, the Committee on Public 
Transportation has studied management options for 
transit service in the lower Pioneer Valley, reviewed 
a population density map prepared by the Office of 
the Town Planner, and heard North Burn, Five 
College Coodinator, discuss the Five College bus 
system. The Committee is trying to determine the 
need for public transportation in Amherst, and plans 
to invite several more speakers in the fall. The 
members of the Committee are: Robert Rivers, 
Chairman, Duane Cromack, Vice Chairman, David 
Hornfischer, Secretary, Judson Ferguson, Douglas 
McGarrah, Phillip McKean, Kenneth Mosakowski, 
Karen Peter, and Jennie Werbe. 
SELECTMEN ENDORSE SCOG REPORT 

As its July 23 meeting, the Board of Selectmen 
voted unanimously to endorse in principle the goals 
and objectives set forth by SCOG. This action 
establishes a more solid base for implementation 
activities and provides moral support for the SCOG 
related citizen committees. 

SCOG RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION 

The SCOG Report has been critiqued in an an- 
notated bibliography published by the Planning 
Advisory Service of the American Society of Planning 
Officials. The bibliography includes reports from 
across the nation which deal with the problem of 
controlling growth. The author shows particular 
interest in the SCOG questionnaire results with 
respect to open space preservation and the extent to 
which taxpayers are willing to pay for an acquisition 
program. 
SPREADING THE WORD 

The Office of the Town Planner has received 
inquiries about SCOG and the implementation of its 
recommendations from many communities, both 
local and out-of-state. We have met recently with 
citizens from South Hadley and Brattleboro, Vermont 
who wish to establish committees to articulate goals 
and objectives for those communities. Most of our 
correspondents seem to be impressed by the degree 
of citizen participation in SCOG's deliberations. 



Staff Recital 
at Music Camp 



The sixth music staff recital of 
the 1973 season will be held at the 
Northeast Music Camp, Hardwick 
Pond Road, Ware, tonight, August 
1. The program, open to the public 
without charge and beginning at 
8:00 p.m., will be held in Hardwick 
Hall. 

The recital will open with the 
Duo Concertante for flute and 
bassoon of Joseph Piala, per- 
formed by flutiest Joyce Oberlin 
and bassoonist Ruth McKee. The 
G. P. Telemann Suite #6 will follow, 
performed by oboist Steve Ham- 
mer, violinist Paul Goldsberry, 
cellist Alice Miles, and pianist 
John Pivarnik. Joyce Oberlin, 
flute, will join members of the 
faculty string quartet for a per- 
formance of the Mozart Flute 
Quartet, K. 298. Assisting Miss 
Oberlin are Sally Matzke, violin, 
David Boltz, viola and Alice Miles, 
cello. 

The alto saxophone, a 20th 
century addition to the chamber 
music literature is featured in the 
two remaining works. Rex Matzke, 
saxophonist, will perform 
Histoires of Jacques Ibert for 
saxophone and piano. John 
Pivarnik will accompany this 
composition. The faculy woodwind 
quintet joins Mr. Matzke for 
Bernard Heiden's Intrade (1970) 
for saxophone and woodwind 
quintet. Performers include Joyce 
Oberlin, flute, Jean Kacanek, 
clarinet, Steve Hammer, oboe, 
Gary Miles, horn and Ruth McKee, 
bassoon. 

Student recitals will be held in 
Hardwick Hall this week on 



Thursday evening August 2, and 
Friday evening August 3, at 8:00 
p.m. These recitals, also open to 
the public, will present a variety of 
solo and ensemble compositions. 
The Thursday evening recital will 
also feature the student stage band 
under the direction of Rex Matzke. 

The third concert of the Nor- 
theast Music Camp Orchestra, 
Choir, and Band will be presented 
on Saturday afternoon, August 4 at 
2:00 p.m. in Hardwick Hall. The 
Orchestra, conducted by David 
Boltz, will perform Three 
Seventeenth Century Dutch Tunes 
arranged by H. Kinder, Two 
Shakespeare Sketches of R. 
Vaughan Williams, and the Joseph 
Jenkins Sinfonia in C op. 37. The 
camp Choir, conducted by Robert 
Nims, will offer performances of 
Mendelssohn's He Watching Over 
Israel, Peter Mennin's Crossing 
the Han River and additional 
works of Franz Haydn and Orlando 
di Lasso. The Symphonic Band will 
be conducted by Arthur Booth 
(Camp Director) and guest con- 
ductor Harold Kacanek and will 
feature Glenn Osser's Beguine for 
Band, Fantasy on American 
Sailing Songs by C. Grundman and 
J. B. Chance's Variations on a 
Korean Folk Song. 

The Counselors of the Music 
Camp will present a recital on 
Monday evening, August 6 in 
Hardwick Hall at 8:00 p.m. This 
recital of solo works will feature a 
variety of composers and in- 
strumentation. The public is 
cordially invited to this per- 
formance. 



The Crier— University of Masiachtnetts— Page 3 



Masque Ensemble 

Bell, Book, And Candle Today 



Student-Labor 
Institute 17 th 




John Countryman is a 1973 
graduate of the University of 
Massachusetts. Boasting a 
Masters Degree in theatre, he 
is currently undertaking a 
professional acting endeavor, 
the principal role of Shep in 
BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE,. 
a Masque Ensemble produc- 
tion appearing this weekend at 
Bowker Auditorium. John will 
also appear in the Story 
Theatre production, "In The 
Good Old Summertime," 
August 6 and 7 in the Com- 
monwealth Room, S.U. While 
at UMass, John played major 
roles in THE COLLECTION, 
INDIANS, THE TRIAL OF 
THE CATONSVTLLE NINE, 
MAJOR BARBARA, and THE 
SHADOW OF A GUNMAN as 
well as directing STILL LIFE, 
ARCHITRUC, and MRS. 
DALLY HAS A LOVER. John 
has also been involved with 
summer theatre in Maine 
where he directed FEIFFER'S 
PEOPLE, LITTLE MUR- 
DERS, and SPOON RIVER 
ANTHOLOGY. While an un- 
dergraduate at Vermont, John 
directed CARNIVAL, 
BRIGADOON, and Beckett's 
PLAY. John has taught 
criticism and acted as 
Business and Publicity 
Manager for UMass Theatre. 
He has also written two plays, 
RECURRENCE, and PIECES, 
DISTRACTION, ETC. 

BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE 
is being performed August 2, 3, 
and 4 at Bowker Auditorium, 
UMass. The production is free 
to UMass students w/I.D. and 
$1.50 for the general public. 
Tickets are available through 
the R.S.O. office in the Student 
Union, call 545-2351, or at the 
door. Curtain time is 8:00 p.m. 



Public Reorg 
Hearing Today 



A special invitation to UMass- campus about America's working 
Amherst students to attend a people. Information is available by 
student-labor institute during the writing Maryann Lettau, 33 
August 17-19 week end has been Harrison Ave., Third Floor, 
issued by a campus support Boston, Ma 02111, Tel. (617) 482- 
committee headed by Louis 6228, or from Leopold at 527-2332. 
Leopold. 

The affair will be held at 
Stonehill College in North Easton, 
Mass. and will handle such topics 
as YOUTH AND LABOR: WHERE 
DO WE GO FROM HERE, LABOR 
AND THE LIBERAL 

TRADITION, CIVIL RIGHTS AND 
AMERICAN UNIONS, LABOR IN 
POLITICS, and THE LABOR 
MOVEMENT IN ISRAEL. Thomas 
R. Brooks, the noted labor 
historian, Velma Hill, black vice- 
president of the AFL/CIO 
Teachers Union, and William 
DuChessi, Textile Workers 
secretary-treasurer, will be among 
the resource people. A film entitled 
THE INHERITANCE, starring 
Judy Collins, Pete Seager, and 
Robert Ryan, will be shown. 

The conference is sponsored by 
FRONTLASH, a permanent voter 
registration group that specializes 
in involving middle and low income 
young people into the political 
process, and the LEAGUE FOR 
INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY, 
founded in 1905 by Jack London 
and Upton Sinclair to educate on 



A public hearing on a plan to 
reorganize education throughout 
the state will be conducted by the 
Joint Legislative Committee on 
Education today at UMass. 

The hearing will be from 4 to 7 
p.m. in room 163 of the UMass- 
Amherst Campus Center. It is one 
of six regional hearings scheduled 
by the Joint Legislative Com- 
mittee, and the only one in Western 
Massachusetts. 

State Senator Walter J. Boverini 
(D), Lynn, and State Represen- 
tative Michael J. Daly (D), Boston, 
are co-chairmen of the Committee 
which will hear public comments 
on House Bill 6160, a plan to create 
a Department of Educational and 
Cultural Affairs. The Bill would 



Massachusetts 
grades through 



reorganize 

elementary 

college. 

The series of six regional 
hearings by the Joint 
Legislative Committee on 
Education began in Lynn July 26, 
and continues according to this 
schedule: Thursday, Aug. 2, 10 
a.m. to 1 p.m., Worcester State 
College; 4 to 7 p.m., UMass- 
Amherst Campus Center room 163. 
Monday, Aug. 6, 10:30 a.m., 
Gardner Auditorium, State House. 
Monday, Aug. 13, 10:30 a.m., 
Gardner Auditorium, State House. 
Thursday, Aug. 16, 1 to 4 p.m., 
Massachusetts Maritime 
Academy, Buzzards Bay. 



"Poor Richard" At MH 



SOUTH HADLEY - Jean Kerr, 
whose PLEASE DON'T EAT THE 
DAISIES and THE SNAKE HAS 
ALL THE LINES, made America 
laugh, also wrote a number of 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 

Rev. Richard E. Koenig, 
Pastor 549-0322 



plays. One of them is POOR 
RICHARD, which opened at the 
Laboratory Theatre on Tuesday. 

What did she do this time to 
make everybody happy? She took 
Richard Ford, a charming and 
talented Welsh poet (to be played 
by Tom Panas) and Cathy Shaw, 
an independent, determined young 
secretary who proposes to him ten 
minutes after they meet (Nana 
Greenwald plays that part) and 
created a warm and perceptive 
comedy. 

Under the direction of Jim 
Cavanaugh, the players, whom you 
saw together in READY WHEN 
YOU ARE, C. B., are joined by 
Michael Walker in the role of 
Sydney Bolton (Michael was the 
assistant director of BLITHE 
SPIRIT), Vicki St. George, the 
unforgettable Madame Arcati in 



the same play, and George Dash, 
memorable in PLAY IT AGAIN, 
SAM. 

A flair for comedy, and a deep 
understanding of relationships 
between people, is Jean Kerr's 
stock in trade. The result, a 
delightful evening under the tent 
on-the-green at the Mount Holyoke 
College Summer Theatre. 

Tickets may be purchased by 
calling the box office, open daily, 
except Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 9:00 
p.m. at 538-2406. Tickets are 
available at $3.50 and $2.50, with 
$1.00 deducted from tickets for 
students on Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Thursday evening per- 
formances. The play begins at 8:30 
p.m. and the signs on the Mount 
Holyoke College campus in South 
Hadley direct one easily to the tent 
and to ample parking facilities. 



Music With A 
Latin Theme 

"Harmonica Man" will be used by The Caballeros, Drum Corps 
the Caballeros competing in the Associates National Champions, 
second annual Superbowl of Music from Hawthorne, New Jersey, will 
in Alumni Satdium at the feature a Latin theme at the 
University of Massachusetts, Superbowl of Music Saturday, 
Amherst. August 18, in Amherst, Mass. 

Other competitors will be: Les Organized in 1946, the Caballeros 
Diplomates from Quebec City, nave ben internationally famous 
Canada; The Skyliners from New for their unique Latin-style of 
York City, defending Superbowl music. They have won more than 
champions, the Hurricanes from 350 competitions. Perennial 
Shelton, Connecticut; The American Legion New Jersey 
Sunrisers from Long Island; and State Champions, the Caballeros 
the Matadors from Providence, R. have won this title every year since 
I. 1949. They have also won the 

The Superbowl will begin at 7:30 American Legion National 
p.m. August 18, in the 20,000-seat Championship eleven times, seven 
Alumni Stadium. The sponsoring times consecutively, and have 
organization, the Belchertown twice won the Drum Corps 
State School Friends Association, a Associates World Championship, 
group dedicated to the im- One of the busiest and best- 
provement of the lives of the traveled (over a half-million 
mentally retarded residents at miles) corps in the nation, the 
Belchertown, will apply the Caballeros frequently perform 
proceeds after expenses to help during NFL. season half-time 
humanize the environment of the shows on a nationwide TV, and in 
residents at Belchertown. Advance other parades, exhibitions, and 
resevations may be made with competitions. 
George Como, 229 Whitmore, Selections of "Man of La Man- 
UMass, Amherst, Mass. 01002. In cha," "South Rampus Street 
case of rain August 18, the Parade," "Everybody's 
program will be the following day, Everything," "Sabre Dance," 
Sunday, at 1:30 p.m. "Flaming o^ Cha Cha," and 




1J — 1[ A MHERSTs m PEPARTMENr STORE)] 



Plaid Cotton Crepe Shirts $9.95 

Embroidered Indian Sheer Cotton Kurtas 

from $5.95 

([N IXT TO THE POSf OFFICE ON K PlEASMTsT^ 



Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 

Return Of The Woodstock Generation 



< i 



Summer Tarn" Draws 600,000 






The crowd in the above 
photo is but a small portion of 
the throngs of people that 
showed up at Watkins Glen 
this past weekend. The oc- 
casion as I am sure everyone 
has heard was "Summer 
Jam", a concert featuring The 
Greatful Dead, The Band, and 
the Allman Brothers. A crowd 
of 150,000 was expected but 
about 600,000 people showed, 
and it was impossible to keep 
them out. People began 
camping in the area in the 
middle of the week for the 
Saturday concert, and by the 
time the music started the 
concert area was solid people. 



Photos by 

Gib Fullerton 






*£>* 




The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 5 



Rainbow Day Brings Magic 



Yesterdays Rainbow 
Festival brought us "Omo 
Lucumi" - African Drummers 
shown in photo at right. They 
played to a crowd in the Music 
Listening room, and 
demonstrated the different 
instruments and techniques. 





The afternoon also brought 
music to the courtyard outside 
the Coffee Shop yesterday. 
Jaime and Ismael Santiago 
played Latin American Music 
by the fountain. 



At the noon hour during 
Rainbow Festival yesterday, 
Walter Chesnut, photo to left, 
demonstrated his many types 
of horns. The Associate 
Professor of Music at I Mass 
drew a large crowd on the 
Campus Center Concourse 
during lunch. 



Photos by 
Gib Fullerton 




Page 6— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



WMUA 

Monday evening at 8 p.m. 
WMUA's International Music 
Series will feature contemporary 
music from England. Susan Fugle 
will join host Joe C. to play and talk 
about such popular groups as the 
Fairport Convention, the Pen- 
tangle, The Incredible String 
Band, and the Steel Ice Band. Ms. 
Fugle's main interest in the music 
of her native England lies in the 
development and popularization of 
traditional and folk strains. 
WMUA 91.1 FM Stereo 
*»• 

—■ M MM 



Notices 

SMALL CLAIMS COURT 
ADVISORY SERVICE 

A Small Claims Court Advisory 
service will be available to those 
people interested in or having 
questions or problems pertaining 
to the nature and function of the 
Small Claims Court. This service 
will be offered by John Lynn, who 
will be located in the WMPIRG 
(Western Mass. Public Interest 
Research Group) office, 2nd floor 
Student Union from 11:30 a.m. to 1 
p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays, commencing on 
August 1, and ending on August 15. 
The booklet "How To Sue In Small 



* *,\T ' 

OF SMITH COLLEGE' 

:OO0V?/; 



See It Now, 
Ends Tuesday! 
at 7:15 & 9:05 



Claims Court", as well as other 
literature will be available to those 
interested. For further information 
contact WMPIRG Regional Office, 

Amherst, 256-6434. 

»*» 

Igor Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du 
Soldat" (The Soldier's Tale) 
directed by Jeffrey Meldman, 
conducted by Chris Blair and 
choreographed by Judy Williams 
will be presented by the MIT 
Community Players with a com- 
panion piece "Facade" (poetry of 
Edith Sitwell spoken to music by 
William Walton) in Kresge Little 
Theatre, MIT. Performances are 
Fri., Aug. 10 at 8:30 p.m. and Sat., 
Aug. 11 at 7:00 p.m. and again at 
9:30 p.m. Tickets are $2.50 and 
may be purchased at the door. For 
reservations call 253-2311. 



UM Gets 
Grant 

WASHINGTON, DC, - U.S. 
Rep. Silvio O. Conte, R-Mass., and 
Sen. Edward W. Brooke have 
announced that UMass and Sen. 
Edward W. Brooke have an- 
nounced that UMass has been 
awarded a $76,248 training grant 
from the National Institute of 
Mental Health. 

The grant will support the first 
vear of a five-year program on 
"Mental Health and Human 
System Design and Ad- 
ministration. Donald K. Carew of 
the School of Education will be the 
principal investigator. 



Outing Club \ 

Thursday, 2 August, canoeing on 
the Connecticut River Oxbow in 
South Hadley, leaves at 5:30 PM 
from the CC Bus Circle in front of 
Stock bridge Hall. 

NOTICE: The Outing Club's 
equipment room has moved from 
its previous location opposite the 
ticket office in the Student Union to 
room SU 415 in the Student Union. 
This is on the Mezzanine above the 
Candy counter. The bulletin board 
is currently in a state of limbo 
sitting on the floor outside the 
ladies (ms.) room on the first floor 
of the S.U. It will eventually be 
moved to the wall opposite the new 
equipment room. So if you can find 
the bulletin board check it for trips 
and signup sheets. 



AIR 
COND. 



AMITY ST. 



• • • 



THE 



THE MOST 
READ BOOK 
ON OR OFF 
CAMPUS 
IS NOW ON 
SCREEN! 




EXPERIMENT 

Harrad College... where free, 
liberated relations between 
coed students are encouraged! 




For 
Elegance 
& Charm . 






Visit The 6th Oldest Theatre In U.S. 




AMHERST0*""* 



NOW 
PLAYING! 



253-5426 



W.C. FIELDS 

TWO OF HIS BEST FILMS! 

"TILLY AND GUS" 

-PLUS- 

5 THE OLD FASHIONED WAY" 



NIGHTLY AT 8:00 FRI.-SAT. 7:00-9:15 SAT.-SUN. 2:00 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS $1.00 




CALVIN]® 

KING ST., NORTHAMPTON 



NOW 
PLAYING! 



20th CENTURY- FOX PRESENTS 

BATTLE FOR THE 

PLANET OT THE APES 

_ . . . THE FINAL CHAPTER 
GLn IN THE APES SAGA 



SHOWN NIGHTLY AT 7:30 & 9:00, SAT.-SUN. 2:00 



MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS SI 00 




Double Feature Tonight 
Student Union Ballroom 

Woody Allen • Play It Again, Sam at 7 ™* io:is 



Astaire & Rogers - Top Hat 

Can't Be Beat 



at 8:30 



«M« 



OTMM 



m 



M 



Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments 

Tome over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show you all the reasons in the world why BRAND YWINE is a 
better place to live. We invite you to compare features and com- 
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models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently "liveable": 

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Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company, Hartford. 
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One bedroom units from $200 
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l^stomdituriKi N 




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Brandy wine at Amherst 



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Harrington Sends Letter 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 7 



Britt Appointed 



U.S. Rep. Michael J. Harrington (D-Mass.), joined 
by 42 other Members of Congress, yesterday called on 
Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Caspar 
Weinberger to delay implementation of welfare 
regulations which would "compromise the legal 
rights of legitimate welfare recipients." 

In a joint letter to Weinberger initiated by 
Harrington, the group urged reconsideration of the 
regulations, charging they "would undermine the 
rights of poor persons without contributing to more 
effective administration." A similar letter to Senator 
Russell Long (D-La.), Chairman of the Senate 
Finance Committee, called for legislation to delay 
implementation of the new rules so that hearings 
could determine their real impact. 

The regulations, which were proposed April 20 by 
HEW, would eliminate all protections in existing 
rules against violations of privacy and personal 
dignity, and would delete present prohibitions against 
harassment of legitimate welfare recipients. 

Emphasizing the "distinction between tightening 
the administration of the welfare program and 
ruining it with needlessly punitive regulations," 
Harrington said the new rules would "interfere with 
the rights of the most needy and politically helpless 
Americans." 

"This is another phase in the Nixon Ad- 
ministration's attack on privacy and personal 
liberty," Harrington asserted, "only slightly less 
devious than the methods employed by the 'plum- 
bers' and other secret operatives." 

Harrington called the HEW regulations "a 
calculated maneuver to break the back of the nation's 
social welfare programs. HEW's action is part of a 
general trend toward punitive and restrictive 
regulations. A new fee schedule for Head Start child 
development centers, for example, would cost more 
to administer than it would bring in. This exemplifies 
the Administration's illogical approach to social 
issues." 

Many national organizations, including the AFL- 



CIO, United Auto Workers, National Association of 
Social Workers, American Federation of County, 
State, and Municipal Employees, Council of Chur- 
ches, League of Women Voters, American Friends 
Service Committee, and the American Civil Liberties 
Union, have also vigorously opposed implementation 
of the welfare regulations. 

The Massachusetts Congressman has already 
introduced legislation to require approval of ap- 
propriate Congressional committees for HEW im- 
plementation of the proposed rules before December 
1. Today's actions were the second phase in what 
Harrington termed "an attempt to bring to light 
Administration policies which disregard the in- 
dividual rights and dignity of those it purports to 
assist." 

Those joining Harrington in sending the two letters 
include: Shirley Chisholm (D-N.Y.), James J. 
Howard (D-N.J.), Jonathan B. Bingham (D-N.Y.), 
Antonio Borja Won Pat (Delegate-Guam), Robert F. 
Drinan (D-Mass.), Peter N. Kyros (D-Me.), Ogden R. 
Reid (D-N.Y.), Gus Yayron (D-Pa.), Louis Stokes (D- 
Ohio), William Clav (D-Mo.), Parren J. Mitchell (D- 
Md), Robert O. Tiernan (D-R.I.), Claude Pepper (D- 
Fla.) Spark M. Matsunaga (D-Hawaii), William Leh- 
mam (D-Fla.), Walter E. Fauntroy (Delegate-D.C), 
Herman Badillo (D-N.Y.), Fortney H. Stark (D- 
Calif .), Edward I. Koch (D-N.Y.), Patricia Schroeder 
(D-Colo.), Jaime Benitez (Delegate-P.R.), Ronald V. 
Dellums (D-Calif.), Bella S. Abzug (D-N.Y.), Andrew 
Young (D-Ga.), John J. Moakley (D-Mass.), 
Elizabeth Holtzman (D-N.Y.), John H. Dent (D-Pa.), 
Edward P. Boland (D-Mass), Robert W. Kasten- 
meier (D-Wis.), John M. Murphy (D-N.Y.), Don 
Edwards (D-Calif.), Frank Thompson, Jr. (D-N.J.), 
James C. Corman (D-Calif.), Fred B. Rooney (ID- 
Pa. ), Augustus F. Hawkins (D-Calif.), William J. 
Green (D-Pa.), John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich.), Henry 
Helstoski (D-N.J.), Benjamins. Rosenthal (D-N.Y.), 
and Peter W. Rodino, Jr. (D-N.J.). 



The appointment of Eugene M. 
Britt as state 4-H health program 
leader has been announced by 
Arless A. Spielman, director of the 
Cooperative Extension Service at 
UMass. 

Mr. Britt will give leadership in 
conducting an educational 
program to improve the knowledge 
and understanding of health 



problems confronting 
Massachusetts youth. As a 
member of the Cooperative Ex- 
tension staff he will work closely 
with existing public and private 
health agencies. Mr. Britt's 
primary audience will be the 
professional and para-professional 
Extension staff and volunteer 4-H 
leaders. 



Crossword Puzzle 



Barbecue To Be Held 



A chicken barbecue and 
recreation will be offered 
classified employees of the 
University of Massachusetts- 
Amherst at the annual staff picnic 
Saturday, Aug. 25, on the south- 
west playing field of the campus. 

Employees will bring spouses or 
dates and have invited retired 
classified UMass employees to do 
likewise. Events will begin at 2 
p.m. and the rain location is 
Berkshire Commons. 

Barbecue tickets may be pur- 
chased, by Aug. 24, at these 
campus locations: Physical Plant 
main desk and check distributing 



A Masque Ensemble 
Production 

John Van Druten's 

Bell, Book, 
and Candle 

July 27-29 and August 2-4 

Bowker Auditorium 

UMass 

8:00 P.M. 

Reservations: Call 545-2351 

Students w/ID FREE 
General Public $1.50 

An Evening of 
Enchantment! 



centers, Worcester Snack Bar, 
Book Store information counter, 
Student Union lobby counter, 
Whitmore copy center, Library 
copy center, Graduate Research 
Center, and School of Education 
copy center. 

Annual competition between 
departments will feature softball, 
volleyball, and tug-of-war; and 
trophies will be given winning 
teams. 



ACROSS 

1 Evaluates 

6 European 

capital 

11 Goddess of the 
moon 

12 Macaws 

14 Smooth 

15 Rages 

17 Army officer 

(abbr.) 

18 Noise 

19 Heaps 

20 Cry of dove 

2 1 Spanish article 

22 Junctures 

23 Forehead 

24 Amends 

26 Secluded 

valleys 

27 Antlered animal 

(pi) 

28 Handle 

29 Tresses 
31 Scorch with 

words 

34 Goddess of 
discord 

35 Holds firmly 

36 Compass point 

37 Pigeon pea 

38 Cutting part of 
instrument 

39 Indonesian 
tribesman 

40 Indefinite arti- 
cle 

41 American 
pioneer 

42 Dye plant 

43 Reports 
45 Correct 

47 Reaches 
across 

48 Bristles 



3 Number 

4 Printer's 

measure 

5 Continued 

stories 

6 Sheets of glass 

7 Academic sub- 

jects 

8 Ethiopian title 

9 Negative prefix 

10 Tavern 

1 1 Hebrew festival 
13 Packs 

away 
16 Charity 

19 Topmost 

points 

20 Crawled 

22 Trades 

for money 

23 Happiness 

25 Danger 

26 Complain 
28 Motorless 

planes 





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29 Evergreen tree 

30 Planet 

31 Seed coat of 

cereal grain 

32 All 

33 Domain 
35 Shine 

38 Having from 
birth a certain 
character 



39 Ox of 
Celebes 

41 Neckpiece 

42 Rear of ship 
44 Member of 

Parliament 
(abbr.) 
46 College degree 
(abbr.) 



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Page 8— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Court Decision Stalls "Super Road" 



A landmark decision handed down by a 
Federal District Court in Brattleboro, 
Vermont, Friday could put a halt to $500 
million worth of highway construction in 
Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut. 
Appeals Court Judge James L. Oakes issued 
a 27-page opinion in a case filed by the 
Conservation Society of Southern Vermont 
and other plaintiffs against federal and state 
highway officials. Oakes' decision denies a 
motion to dissolve the injunction stalling 
construction of a segment of U.S. Route 7 
between Bennington and Manchester, 
Vermont. 

The Coalition on Route 7 hailed Friday's 
decision as a victory for environmental 
interests in the three states. The Coalition, 
composed of three national and eight 
regional conservation groups, joined the suit 
as amicus curiae (friends of the court) prior 
to hearings in Rutland last May. Spokesmen 
for the Coalition said Oakes' decision on the 
20-mile Vermont section could effectively 
block or delay construction plans for a 
relocated Route 7 between Norwalk, Con- 
necticut and Burlington, Vermont. 

Oakes ordered a halt to the Vermont 
construction last year because federal high- 
way officials had failed to prepare an En- 
vironmental Impact Statement (EIS) as 
required under the National Environmental 
Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The Vermont 
Highway Department submitted an EIS, 
approved by the U.S. Department of 



Transportation, to the court in March, 
requesting a go-ahead on the road. 

Denying that request Friday, Oakes held 
that the impact statement filed in March is 
still inadequate to comply with NEPA. His 
opinion, in part, states that: 

1) The EIS filed by the Vermont High- 
way Department does not fulfill NEPA 
requirements that the final impact 
statement be prepared by the Federal 
Highway Administration. 

2) The EIS was insufficient to comply 
with NEPA because it did not properly 
weigh the economic costs and benefits 
of the proposed construction. 

3) The EIS failed to consider the 
Vermont segment as part of a long- 
range plan for construction along the 
three-state Route 7 corridor. 

4) The EIS failed to comply with 
section 4(f) of the Department of 
Transportation Act regarding national 
forest land affected by the proposed 
highway. Section 4(f) prohibits cutting 
highways through parks unless it can 
be shown that no feasible alternative 
exists. 

The decision could have national impact, 
laying groundwork for new interpretations 
of the law under NEPA. The opinion re- 
quires, for the first time, that federal high- 
way officials prepare an impact statement in 
cooperation with more than one state. 



The case raises the question, said Oakes in 
his opinion, whether "an overall EIS may be 
required at any time, or whether particular 
segments of a highway may be constructed 
with an EIS required only as to those 
segments. This question is plainly one which 
goes right to the essence of the traditional 
federal-state highway planning process." 

Judge Oakes also raised broader 
questions regarding the use of federal funds 
for highway construction. "Of course an 
overall EIS for all of Route 7," he said, 
"would have one major consideration in 
mind, whether a superhighway is en- 
vironmentally and otherwise the most 
viable alternative. Since the very agency 
which would be considering this derives its 
funds from highway tax money and is 
committed to the development of 'long 
range highway plans and programs '...one 
would suppose that the ultimate EIS may 
not be as objectively formulated as might be 
hoped for." 

"Indeed," the opinion continued, "one 
would go so far as to suggest that perhaps 
the very existence of so-called highway 
'trust funds,' usable only for highway 
construction and not other forms of mass 
transportation, is in a very fundamental 
sense inconsistent with the NEPA 
requirements that other alternatives be 
considered." 

The court's decision will continue to block 
work on the Vermont segment of Route 7, 



pending an appeal or the filing of an 
adequate impact statement. The decision 
could also stop or delay plans to reroute and 
expand sections of the road in 
Massachusetts and Connecticut, including 
the highly-contested by-pass of Pittsfield, 
Mass., depending upon the outcome of 
appeals to the U.S. Circuit or Supreme 
Courts. 

The decision marks a victory for the 
Coalition, which sparked controversy 
earlier this year with charges that federal 
and state highway authorities had engaged 
in a "conspiracy" to construct a new four- 
lane Route 7 spanning the three states. 

Spokesmen for the Coalition said they 
expect the federal Department of Tran- 
sportation and the Vermont Highway 
Department to appeal the decision to a 
higher court. 

Members of the Coalition on Route 7 are 
the Berkshire-Litchfield Environmental 
Council (BLEC), Citizens for Balanced 
Environment and Transportation (CBET), 
the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), 
Hoosic River Basin Citizens' Environmental 
Protection Association (HRBCEPA), 
Housatonic Valley Association (HVA), Lake 
Champlain Committee, National Resources 
Defense Council (NRDC), the Sierra Club, 
South Berkshire Research, the Vermont 
Public Interest Research Group (VPIRG), 
and the Western Mass. Public Interest 
Research Group(WMPIRG). 



Hal Boyle 



PIRG To Survey 

Discrimination 
In Housing 



Harvard Was Wrong 



WMPIRG, Western Mass. Public 
Interest Research Group, is 
conducting a pilot survey on 
discrimination against women in 
housing in Western Mass. and 
needs your help. According to 
Mass. General Laws 151 B, it is an 
unlawful practice fo landlords or 
realtors to deny housing on the 
basis of sex or marital status 
(preferring married to single in- 
dividuals). We wish to document 
large scale discriminatory acts of 
apartmetn complexes as well as 
handle individual complaints. 



WMPIRG can help you if notified 
immediately of a discriminatory 
practice so that testers can follow 
up on the problem while the 
housing is still available. You can 
be of service to WMPIRG by 
notifying us of any past 
discriminatory practices against 
you as a woman so that we can find 
the best places to send testers. If 
you have a complaint, call WM- 
PIRG at 256-6434, or pick up a 
survey form at the Everywoman's 
Center in Munsen Hall. 



NEW YORK-One of Harvard's 
English professors told Robin 
Moore: 

"I would advise you against 
taking any further courses in 
creative writing. Your talents 
don't lie in that field." 

That hurt Moore, future author 
of such best sellers as "The Green 
Berets," "The French Con- 
nection," and "The Happy 
Hooker." 

"What hurt even more was that 
my other English teachers had the 
same low opinion of my writing 
ability," he recalled. 

So at first, after getting his 
degree in 1949, Moore dutifully 
tried to find greener pastures in 
other fields. He tried to learn the 
hotel business under the tutelage of 
his father, Robert Lowell Moore, 
board chairman of the Sheraton 
Hotel chain. 

He didn't like it. Then, following 



his urge for adventure, he says he 
did some gun running in Cuba- 
"first for Castro, then against 
him"-ran a bar called "The 
Teahouse of the Blue Lagoon" in 
Jamaica, and worked as a 
television producer and science 
fiction script writer in New York. 

But all the time he kept churning 
out novels based on his own ex- 
periences. 

"I think I wrote six failures in a 
row," he admitted. It looked as if 
his Harvard teachers had pegged 
him right. 

His luck turned when his novel, 
"The Country Team," a story 
based on CIA operations in 
Southeast Asia, was sold to a 
paperback publisher for $250,000 
after a meager sale in hard covers. 

Since then he has hit nothing but 
jackpots with his tales of military 



derring-do and explosures of un- 
derworld profiteering in drugs and 
prostitution. His paperbook sales 
alone run into a dozen millions. 

His latest novel, "The Fifth 
Estate," which deals with an in- 
ternational crime syndicate's bid 
to control the American 
presidency, was sold in advance of 
hard cover production to a 
paperback publisher for $340,000. 
Moore is already working on the 
screen treatment. 



1 'Streetcar Named Desire 



9 9 



GREENFIELD, MASS... Arena 
Civic Theatre is joining the other 
theater groups throughout the 
country in the commemoration of 
the opening of Tennessee Williams' 
"A Streetcar Named Desire" on 
Broadway 25 years ago. Silver 
anniversary productions have 
been presented by the Lincoln 
Center Company in New York, the 
Hartford Stage Company and in 
theaters in Los Angeles and other 
key cities. 

The powerful drama has become 
a classic in American theatre and 
is notable for its excellent writing 
and rich characterizations. 
Blanche DuBois and Stanley 
Kowalski were created on 
Broadway, under the direction of 
Elia Kazan, by Jessica Tandy and 
Marlon Brando and have been 
played by notable performers 
since that time. In the movie 
version, Vivien Leigh gave an 
unforgettable performance as the 
tortured Blanche and Brando 
repeated his stage charac- 
terization. 

The play is as exciting today as it 
was when first produced and 
receives nothing by extravagant 



praise. Reviews for the recent New 
York production stated: "If you've 
never seen 'Streetcar', you must 
see it now! If you have seen it, you 
ought to see it again."-WNEW 
Radio; "A Masterpiece! "Watts, 
Post, "One of the most celebrated 
plays of the century... offers in- 
tensity, high passion, humor and 
romance"-Barnes, N.Y. Times. 

The Arena Civic Theatre 
production will open Wednesday, 
August 1 and play only four per- 
formances-August 1, 2, 3 and 4 at 
8:30 p.m. at the Roundhouse, 
Franklin County Fairgrounds in 
Greenfield. 



The play is directed by Ralph 
Levy of Northampton, who has 
directed the play previously for the 
Circle Players some years ago. 
The set and lighting is designed by 
Brian Marsh, technical director for 
ACT this summer. 

The cast is headed by Ann 
Christern, producer of ACT, as 
Blanche DuBois and Duane Estes 
of Northfield as Stanley Kowalski. 
Stella is played by Norma Bialas 
and Mitch by Woody Brown. 

Tickets are on sale at the Box 
Office from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. daily 
except Sunday. Call 413-772-6297 for 
information. 



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August 7. 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 13 




University Dancers Here Thursday 



The University Dancers of the 
University of Massachusetts will 
be performing at Bowker 
Auditorium on the Amherst 
campus on Thursday, August 9th at 
8:00 p.m. This will be the dancers 
last performance in the area 
before leaving for the 7th In- 
ternational Congress of Physical 
Education and Sport for Girls and 
Women in Tehran, Iran where they 
will be the only dance group from 
the United States. 

The University Dancers is 
composed of men and women from 
many academic areas at the 
University. Most of the students 
are either majoring in dance 
through the Bachelor Degree of 
Individual Concentration 
Program, or in the dance con- 
centration program through the 
School of Physical Education. 
Several are graduate students, one 
in French and the other in Sport 
Administration. Two young women 
who graduated in 1972 as dance 
concentration students, remained 
in Amherst so that they could 
obtain more performance ex- 
perience before going on with their 
own dance career. Most of the 
dancers hope to have careers in 
performing and will soon head for 
Boston and New York in pursuit of 
a professional dance career and 
the others will pursue graduate 
degrees and hope to teach at the 
college level in the future. 

The program of dances to be 
performed include 14 dances from 
the University Dancers repertory, 
as well as a new ballet solo by Judi 
Olson. The majority of dances are 
modern dance, the only art form 
indigenous to the United States. 
The styles vary greatly from the 
very dramatic Encounters by 
Andrea Watkins, to My Reindeer 
Flies Backward, a very amusing 
spoof on ballet, by the same 
choreographer. Scorpio by Marcia 
Thomas, brings the lively style of 



jazz to the stage, and Tarcosic 
Dialogue by Daniel A. Peterson, 
shows the use of the voice for ac- 
companiment in dance. Espiritu 
Libre, by William Serralles is a 



year, it gave a record 18 per- 
formances off campus. The first 
January tour, in 1973, proved 
extremely successful with the 
dancers performing 8 concerts in 



year Richard Jones, a professional 
dancer who specializes in jazz and 
modern ballet, will join Miss 
Patton, Miss Watkins, Mr. 
Peterson, and Mr. Crescione, in 




dynamic solo that exhibits man's 
search for the free self and shows 
uncanny control in movement that 
soars from the very fast to very 
slow. 

University Dancers has been in 
existence since the fall of 1970 
when it first put on a lecture- 
demonstration at the Northfield- 
Mt. Herman School, and continued 
to give 6 more performances that 
year off campus, and 3 per- 
formances on campus. Since that 
time, the University Dancers 
combined with the University 
Concert Dance Group to give 4 
nights of concerts in the fall, and 4 
in the spring of each year. Last 



The University Dancers. 

10 days, throughout New England. 
The majority of concerts where 
given in Jr. High and Sr. High 
Schools, where there is an amazing 
interest in dance with both the boys 
and girls in those schools and were 
received enthusiastically. In 
February, the dancers assisted in a 
High School Dance Workshop 
offered through Continuing 
Education, and many of the 
students performed before at- 
tending the 3 day session. 

The dance faculty at the 
University all make a contribution 
to the group, either through 
choreography, direction, per- 
forming or musical direction. Next 



meeting the eager students who 
take dance at the University. 

The University Dancers will 
leave on August 12th for Rome, 
Italy, where they will give a per- 
formance in Anzio, 60km from 
Rome. After a week in Italy the 
dancers depart for Teteran, where 
they will perform August 21 for the 
Congress, and on August 25th in a 
concert arranged by the Iran- 
American Society. 

The final performace to be given 
by the dancers will be in Athens, 
Greece. The performance is slated 
for Patras, the oldest Roman ruins, 
in an outdoor theatre, or aboard 



the USS Forrestal, which will be in 
dock at the time. Either per- 
formance should prove to be ex- 
citing and rewarding for the 
dancers. 



The University Dancers, under 
the direction of Marilyn V. Patton, 
and associate director Andrea 
Watkins, will travel with twelve 
student dancers-Robert Chiarelli, 
Barton Drake, Carol Flechner, 
Paula Frausini Macdougall, Judi 
Olson, Marilyn Patton, Karen 
Rudkin, Janice Schleiger, William 
Serralles, Bruce Smith, David 
Smith, Marcia Thomas, Patricia 
Warner, and Andrea Watkins; and 
two technical crew - Christopher 
Rudkin, stage manager, and Kevin 
MacDougall, sound technician. 

The dancers have worked hard 
and long during the past academic 
year, to raise the necessary $12,000 
needed for the trip. They have 
given 26 performances throughout 
New England, have raffled off a 
trip to Bermuda, sold many 
cookies and brownies, as well as 
souvenir booklets, and received 
generous support from the many 
patrons, sponsors and friends who 
have so graciously contributed to 
their trip. They are indeed grateful 
to those persons who have sup- 
ported them. 

The University Dancers will be 
in concert on Thursday, August 9th 
at 8:00 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium 
to present the same program they 
will perform in Italy, Iran and 
Greece. The dancers are still $1,000 
short of their goal for that tour. 
Your attendance at the Per- 
formance will be a way of showing 
your support and contributing to 
their goal. Tickets may be obtained 
at the door or through Student 
Activities, Student Union (545- 
2351). 



Zuponcic Here Tomorrow 




Veda Zuponcic 



The talented concert pianist, 
Veda Zuponcic, will be performing 
at Bowker Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. 
tomorrow evening. Ms. Zuppncic 
will also provide an informal 
musical break for people on the 
Campus Center Concourse at 12 
noon. 

Veda Zuponcic is a young native 
of Minnesota, where she received 
her early training. She furthered 
her studies at Indiana University 
as a scholarship pupil of Sidney 
Foster and received both her 
Bachelor and Masters degrees as 
well as the coveted Performers 
Certificate. Ms. Zuponcic's post 
university studies have been with 
Illona Kabos in New York and in 
London. 

Obviously gifted, Ms. Zuponcic 
has been the recipient of numerous 
awards and grants for study in 
Europe. She has traveled and 
performed in Vienna, Amsterdam, 
the Hague, Stolkholm, Berlin, 
Milan and London. The Berlin 
"Telegraf" says that her per- 
formance there "sparkled with 
vertuosity, refinement and ex- 
pression." 

Summer Students with Iden- 
tification are free, others can 
obtain $1.50 tickets at the Student 
Union. 



Campus Carousel 

Bikes And Tenure 



By TONY GRANITE 
GONE TO THE DOGS. . for one 

day was the campus of Indiana 
University, where 1,000 dogs 
jammed its Memorial Stadium, 
this summer. Objective, according 
to the Indiana Daily Student, was 
to show off the canines by their 



owners. 



• • • 



FACULTY PROTECTION is the 

policy of the administration at the 
University of South Florida, ac- 
cording to a story in The Oracle. 

The policy was revealed in a 
recent request by USF prexy Cecil 
Mackey that the Board of Regents 
authorize the university lawyer to 
represent a member of the faculty 
in a civil court suit. 

The faculty member has been 
charged by a former student with 
assault and battery, false arrest 
and defamation of character. 

Regents chancellor said, "We 
are anxious to do what we can do 

protect our faculty." 

• • • 

TENURE DOESN'T stand in the 
way of terminations of 15 faculty 
appointments at Mankato (Minn) 



State U., according to the Daily 
Reporter. 

The campus newspaper an- 
nounces that the MSU faculty 
senate approved the sending of 
termination notices to faculty in 
four academic departments 
because of decreased enrollments. 

The vice-president of academic 
affairs was quoted as saying that 
"the reductions were based on 
program needs, not faculty 
tenure." 



* • » 



MOVING SENIOR CLASS GIFT 

has been recorded by the Moody 
Bible Institute (Chicago), in a 
recent edition of the Moody 
Student. 

Seems that the class decided to 
give ten five-speed bikes to the 
Institute for use of students, who 
would rent them. 



• ♦ • 



HUMOR at the Barton County 
(Kans) Junior College is revealed 
in this item appearing in The In- 
terrobang: "Keep smiling. It 
makes people wonder what you've 
been up to." 



Page 2— University of Massachusetts — The Crier 



Crier 



The Crttr is a semi-weekly publication of the Summer session 1»73, University of 
Massachusetts. Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advertising 
Services, Inc. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 

Contributors 



Stephen G. Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 

Zamir Nestelbaum 




I 



Sam just loves to shovel but 
sometimes it gets too thick even for 
him. But he just takes a rest and 
goes back for more of the same like 
the rest of us. 



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Crier Quiz 




Here's todays mystery person obviously famous 
by the number of awards she has won. The hint is 
that her uniform is from a communist nation. The 
first person to come to 402 Student Union and tell us 
who she is gets his/her picture in Thursdays Crier. 



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Here's Tuesdays contest winner, ft 
Marty Ertel of 366 Northampton ifc 



Rd. She just graduated with an 
M.A. in Theatre and is the designer 
of the Masque Ensemble 
production of "The Good Ole 
Summer Time". 



Zamir Nestelbaum 



Taxpayers Subsidize S. Viet Prisons 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— Page 3 



Mittel Amerika, Ja! 



With all the present controversies centering around 
the Watergate Affair and all the other charges of 
corruption levelled against the Nixon administration, 
namely the Robert Vesco-Maurice Stans Affair, the 
Bebe Rebozo Check Laundering Caper, the I.T.T. 
Swindle, the Presidential Retreat Fraud, the White 
House Lawn Graft, the Martha Mitchell extortion, it 
seems to me that the real cause of these is lost on the 
American people. It's not that Nixon is corrupt, or 
that he isn't a nice guy, or that he doesn't love his 
wife, Pat or his dogs Checkers and Julie. It's not that 
Mitchell isn't a square shooting guy. It's not that 
Bebe Rebozo, Harold T. Geneen and Robert Vesco 
aren't credits to American business and finance. The 
real reason for all of these "lighthearted pranks", to 
use a Nixonian euphemism, is a diabolical plot by the 
Berlin Crew that Reichsfuehrer Milhousen brought in 
to run the country. Milhousen recruited these men all 
the way from the plains of Bavaria to the distant 
steps of Argentina and brought them in to power here 
to fashion out, as Milhousen himself put it: The Great 
Mittel Amerika. A meeting a while ago in the office of 
Reichsfuehrer Milhousen may have gone like this: 
"KLEINDIENST! ! ! ! ! "-"Ja Mein Fuehrer! ! " 
"ZIEGLER! !!!"-" Javol Herr Milhousen!!" 
"ERLICHMAN!!!"-"Ja Mein Commandant!!" 
"HALDEMAN! ! ! "-"Ja Mein Meister! ! " 
"KALMBACH!!! "-"Javol Herr Fuehrer!!" 
"Kissinger! !!"-"Ja Herr Milhousen!!" 
"STANS! ! ! "-"Javol Mein Fuehrer! ! " 
"SCHLESHINGER! '."-"Javol! ! !" 
"Butz!!"-"At Your Command Herr Milhousen!!" 
"Klink!!"-"What is it!!" 
"Goering!!"-"Here as Usual Mein Fuehrer!!" 
"Schultz! ! "-"I see nothing! ! ! " 
'Goot! ! I am glad to see zat you are all here. Ve vill 
have arder immediately, Mach Schnell! ! ! Goot! ! Ze 
reason zat I have gadered you; here is to put some 
German precision into zis nation. Two zings in par- 
ticular influenced my decision. Ze first vas ze 
magnificent vay in vich ze 1972 Summer Olympics 
vere held in Munchen and ze second vas zat ze defeat of 
zat communist last November vich gave me a clear 
mandate to institute ze kind of government zat I vould 
like. Now! Are zere any questions? Nein? Goot!!! 
Now! ! Your Mission should you decide to accept it, is 
to turn Amerika into a land Zat even ze illustrious 



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$*****************************$ 

Letters Policy 

The Crier will accept letters to the editor. The only requirements are 
that they be typed at sixty spaces and doubled spaced, and that the author 
(s) sign them and include a telephone number for reference. Letters from 
organizations will be accepted, but a reference number must be included. 
The Crier reserves the right to edit letters either for space or content 
according to the judgement of the editors. 



first Fuehrer would have recognized. A land flowing 
vith milk and Volksvagons. A land built for Ze sooper 
folk, ze Mittel Amerikans. Ve vill have goot, strong, 
hardworking, straight thinking, religious, con- 
servative, patriotic blue-eyed Amerikans ruling zis 
great nation. Ve vill doavay vith "zose bums" ze long 
haired smelly left winged, pot smoking college youth. 
Ve vill do avay vith crime by doing avay vith 
criminals. Ve vill do avay vith minority unrest by 
doing avay vith minorities. Getting rid of ze Blacks, 
ze Chicanos, ze Indians, Ze Puerto Ricans, Ze Jews, 
ze Catolics, ze Dodgers, ze Miami Dolphins. Ve will 
cleanse ze blood of zis nation. Zere vill be no more 
Demonstrations! ! I No more Drugs! ! ! ! No more Bill 
of Rights!! Vith your help and vith ze help of EL 
Douche, Frank Rizzo, ve vill make zis a land livable 
for ze true folk-us. Goot!!! Now you vill use every 
trick in ze book to accomplish zis end. You vill lie, 
cheat, raid, steak, peddle your influence, commit 
perjury, extort, intimidate, send out phony letters, 
etcetera. Goot!! ! Okay first!! I vant zat you shood 
take care of my political enemies. I have ze list. I 
vant zat ze Democratic Office should be ransacked 
and looted. I vant zat zat dirty Communist McGovern 
be linked to Red Funds. I vant zat you should keep an 
eye on zat Polack (Muskie) and zat you should set up 
a zat drunken Irishman (Kennedy). I vant zat 
communist Ellsberg be convicted and zose hippie 
freaks in Gainesville also. After zis, I vant zat ve 
should look after our friends-I.T.T. Herr Geneen, 
Amerikan Airlines, Bobbie Vesco, Bebe Rebozo. I 
vould like zeu a few improvements on my villas. After 
zese zings I vould like to take over ze Congress and ze 
Supreme Court and build ze Milhousen Reich. Zis is 
your mission. Should you not decide to accept it you 
vill be shot. Any questions? Nein!!! Goot!!! Auf 
Vieder Zein!!" 

As the Berlin Crew might have filed out, President 
Milhousen might have retired to his oval office to 
meet with the real rulers of America: 

"SCHLITZ!!"-"Ja Mein Fuehrer!!!" 

"BUDVEISER!!! "-"Javol Herr Milhousen!!!" 

"HEINEKEN!!!"-"Here Mein Commandant!!" 

"Michelob!!! "-"Javol!!" . 

"SCHAEFER!!! "-"Always ready Herr 
Fuehrer!!" 

"Pabst!!" 



About That Parking Thing 



To The Editor: 

Listening with concern to the WMUA broadcast on 
July 31, 12 noon to 1 : 30 p.m., one cannot but stop and 
ponder over the following questions: 

1. Who causes greater damage - 25,000 students, 
staff, and faculty or 9 trustees - the trampling on what 
was once the green on this campus? 

2. Who causes greater air pollution, who litters this 
campus more, who causes greater noise pollution, 
greater dangers and death with auto accidents, use 
the roads more, fighting against change, and fighting 
to maintain the status quo-25,00 students, staff and 
faculty or 9 trustees? 

3. With respect to the above questions, was the 
attempt to paint the trustees as blackguards by 
questioning the fulfillment of their committment to 
the environment justified? 

4. Who is going to avoid the fact that the original 
proposal was to hike the parking fees to the range of 
about $25-125, was reduced (twice?) to the present of 
about $12-50? 

5. Who is going to believe that, if this has as one of 
its many motives-to reduce the congestion of in- 
coming cars onto campus, the present schedule will 
reduce the traffic by levels greater than or even equal 
to, the original proposal? 

6. Who would like to disprove the fact that the 
present $5 parking fee is one of the lowest in the 
country, and that even at $55 it averages a little over 
a dollar a week, which is much less than, say, the per 
capita expenditure on cigarettes in this country 
alone!? 

7. Who will try to convince me that in waiting for a 
ride into campus from a residential complex at 1:40 
p.m. on July 31st, 67 cars had to pass me without 
stopping before the 68th did stop? 

8. If for those 67 it was a snob-status to drive by 
"with their noses in the air", who will try to prove 
that a said snob-status does not have a cost factor 
attached to it in this case an increase in parking fees 
for the 'right' of on-campus parking? Besides, who 
can claim parking space for his car as a 'birthright'? 

9. Who would like to avoid recognising reality that 
in this material, affluent, (and selfish? God forbid!) 
nation the richest in the world- with a per capita in- 
come in excess of $3,500 per year-ironically. what 



seems to hurt is a measly $12-50 for a privilege to 
pollute the air, crowd the streets, encourage and 
partake on over 50,000 deaths a year on the nations 
roads & highways, ad infinitum? 

10. Who will disagree that the radio broadcast gave 
a strictly one-sided view of the situation, apparently 
giving the impression that (a) the Trustees and the 
Planning Office were a band of master-criminals, or 
dogs in the manger -whichever you prefer, and (b) the 
protesting minority (150-200 present) had a 100% 
support from those of the 25,000 staff, students and 
faculty who were in absentia? 

11. Who is really willing to make, if need be, a 
sacrifice? Who is ready to contribute to a social 
benefit, not just increase social costs? This is a 
question that must be answered evidenced by the fact 
that in spite of alternatives, there are significant 
numbers of personal automobiles coming in from 
residential within a three-mile radius of the campus, 
& from areas served by the senate bus system. 

12. Who against, say, defense spending, will carry 
his principle through and now be against excessive 
use of automobiles? 

13. Who will try to fight the fact that increased use 
of personal motor transport brought about the death 
of mass transit in this country-and that the latter 
cannot be revived if the former is not curtailed? 

14. Who is willing to take me as a brother, after 
reading thus far, realising full well the (social) im- 
plications of a brother (or for that matter, that of a 
sister)? 

It is not my intention to make an issue of what I 
have written. Remembering Col. Berry's words "He 
who bitches the most is usually he who will not lift 
himself up and work for a solution", those of Martin 
Luther King, Jr. "Let no man pull you so low as to 
make you hate him", and George Bernanos' 
"Violence is the last resort of a world that refuses to 
judge itself", all I ask is that if universal and lasting 
peace can be established only if it based on social 
justice, then if you desire peace, you must cultivate 
justice. 

You cannot complain about a situation, if you are 
helping bring in a solution. 

Enough said. Now start caring-because tomorrow 
may be too late. For you. For me. For what is left of 
mankind. 

In Peace, In Jesus. 

N.Haridasan 



By ZOE BEST 

Even after the signing of the 
peace agreement which was to halt 
military action in Vietnam, there 
still remains over 200,000 poitical 
prisoners in South Vietnam's jails 
and prisons and people continue to 
be arrested. After the ceasefire 
news in October, Thieu's nephew 
on a Nov. 11 CBS news broadcast 
reported that 50,000 people had 
been arrested since October 26. 

Thieu presently maintains with 
U.S. tax money, a 300,000 member 
police and security force with over 
a dozen organizations and ap- 
proximately 1,000 jails and prisons. 

Over $150 million has already 
been spent specifically to maintain 
and build South Vietnam's prison 
and security operation. Senator 
Edward Kennedy found that $14.8 
million will be allocated to the 
South Vietnam prison and jail 
system, the police and secret 
police forces this coming fiscal 
year. (Globe, 6-24-73). With 
combined action from the House 
and Senate, the South Vietnamese 
police and prisons would receive 
the following if current bills were 
to pass after the August recess: 

$869,000 in "technical support" 
funds for police computer training; 

$246,000 in "public ad- 
ministration" funds for direct 
police training; 

$1,505,000 in "public works" 
funds for police telecom- 
munications ; 

$3,787,000 in previously ap- 
propriated funds: 

$1,285,000 for public safety 
telecommunications 

$2,472,000 for national police 
support 

$30,000 for corrections system 
support 

There is a total of $10,600,000 in 
the Department of Defense budget 
request for fiscal year 1974 for 
support of the South Vietnamese 
police. This includes $9.3 million 
for replacement parts for the 
National Police and $1.3 million for 
police telecommunications. 



Wanted 

Cocktail Waitresses 
and Waitresses 

for Immediate and 

Fall Employment 

at The Chequers 

Interviews 

Friday Aug. 10th 2-4 p.m. 



Presently there exists several 
bills and amendments which would 
prohibit these appropriations. 
H9360, House Foreign Aid Bill 
would stipulate that no aid would 
be provided to support the ad- 
ministration, maintenance or 
support of police and prisons in 
foreign countries. Representative 
Parren Mitchell has an amend- 
ment to this bill stipulating that no 
aid would be given until political 
prisoners would be released in the 
case ofJSouth Vietnam. The Senate 
bill 1443 would make similar 
stipulations regarding funding of 
prison systems in foreign coun- 
tries. 

Regarding the human side of the 
political prison situation in South 
Vietnam, high school, university 
students, university professors, 
Young Christian Workers, 
Catholics, Buddhist monks, women 
and families are among those in 
prison. Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao 
was arrested two days before the 
peace agreement for having 
written four songs about peace. 
She is 14 years old. 

One of the most famous 
prisoners is Madame Ngo Ba 
Thanh. She is an internationally 
known jurist and is a professor of 
international law, knows three 
languages-French, Spanish and 
English in addition to Vietnamese. 



Today In History 



Today is Tuesday, August 7th, 
the 219th day of 1973. There are 146 
days left in the year. Today's 
highlight in history:* 

On this date in 1789, the U. S. War 
and Navy departments were 
established. 

On this date - 

In 1804, an American fleet 
bombarded the Mediterranean 
port of Tripoli. 

In 1912, a Progressive party 
convention in Chicago nominated 
Theodore Roosevelt for president. 

In 1941, Soviet planes carried out 
their first bombing raids against 
Berlin in the World War II. 

In 1959, the Chinese Communists 
invaded a northeastern frontier 
area of India. 

In 1963, the American first lady, 
Mrs. John F. Kennedy, gave birth 
to a son in Otis Air Force Base 
hospital on Cape Cod. The infant 
died two days later. 

Ten years ago: West Germany 
announced that more than 16,000 
East Germans had escaped to the 
West in the two years since the 
Communists built the Berlin Wall. 







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She has a doctorate in law from the 
University of Paris, a doctorate in 
law from the University of Bar- 
celona and a master's degree in 
comparative law from Columbia 
University in New York. During 
the unopposed re-election df Thieu 
in October of 1971 she headed the 
Vietnamese Women's organization 
and worked against the election of 
Thieu. She was arrested and 
during her trial in March of 1972 
she was carried on a stretcher, 
suffering a severe asthmatic at- 
tack which brought on heart 
failure. Her trial was postponed 
and she was returned to prison. 
Though sick as reported by 
released French teacher Andre 
Menras, Madame Thanh would 
shout out to other women inmates 
teachings and news about the 
personal incidents happening in 
the prison. In May of 1973, Catholic 
Bishop Thomas Gumbleton of 
Detroit reported that her family is 
unable to learn of her whereabouts 
and her present condition. 

For those concerned with this 
perpetuation of torture and im- 
prisonment of those suffering the 
crime of only wanting the 
restoration of peace and the ending 
of Thieu's repression, they can 
write to Ambassador Iran Kim 
Phuong, Vietnamese Embassy, 
2551 "R" St., N.W., Washington, 
DC. 20009 or to Kurt Waldheim, 
Secty. General, United Nations, 
UN Plaza, NY. 10017. Of course, 
individual representatives and 
senators can be written about the 
pending bill which would continue 
to finance Thieu's prison and police 
network. 

Today in the Campus Center 
outside the coffeeshop, the film "A 
Question of Torture" will be 
shown. It was made in the Spring of 
1973 and interviews and shows the 
release of some of the political 
prisoners. The showing of this film 
is sponsored by Everywoman's 
Center. 

Notices 

UM ASS OUTING CLUB TRIPS 

Tuesday, August 7, Canoeing on 
the Conn. River Oxbow, leaves at 5 
PM from the C.C. Bus Circle. 
Really nice flat water canoeing. 
People with cars come at 4:30 to 

load canoes, please. 

• * * 

SMALL CLAIMS COURT 
ADVISORY SERVICE 

A Small Claims Court Advisory 
service will be abailable to those 
people interested in or having 
questions or problems pertaining 
to the nature and function of the 
Small Claims Court. This service 
will be offered by John Lynn, who 
will be located in the WMPIRG 
(Western Mass. Public Interest 
Research Group) office, 2nd floor 
Student Union from 11 :30 a.m. to 1 
p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays, commencing on 
August 1, and ending on August 15. 
The booklet "How To Sue In Small 
Claims Court", as well as other 
literature will be available to those 
interested. Phone number during 
the above hours is 545-0712. For 
further information contact 
WMPIRG Regional Office, 
Amherst, 256-6434. 

e e • 

Christian Science College 
Organization warmly invites you to 
its weekly meeting at 6:45 p.m. 
every Tuesday. Come and hear the 
Truth that heals. See Campus 
Center Calendar for room number. 



VD Clinic To Open 



In some communities, 10 to 20% of young adults have gonorrhea. The 
high incidence of venereal diseases among young people is a much 
publicized problem. In Hampshire County, the traditional policy of talk 
with no action is being replaced by the availability of prompt diagnosis 
and preventative education. Every Tuesday, beginning August 7, 1973, 
the Community Health Care Project will open a venereal disease 
screening center at 42 Maple Street in Florence, Massachusetts. The 
clinic will operate evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Because the clinic is 
presently receiving no support apart from the time donated by its staff, a 
donation of $1.00 will be requested from each client. For certain tests 
which are more expensive, a minimal additional donation may also be 
requested. These donations are only to cover the cost of the materials 
used for the tests. 

The Community Health Care Project is a group of people who believe 
that health care must respond to human needs; that health care needs to 
be personal, inexpensive, accountable, and community based and 
operated. The Project believes that all men and women have a human 
right to knowledge about their bodies and the care of their bodies. 

The staff of the venereal disease screening clinic has been trained by 
the staff of the Worthington Health Center and Doctor David Mendelson. 
The clinic staff includes experienced and sensitive counselors for 
pregnancy and VD. Gonorrhea smears, syphilis serologies, pap smears, 
and pregnancy testing will be performed at cost. 

Health education courses will be offered in the fall. The Com n. unity 
Health Care Project is also in the process of developing a local health 
resource and referral center. 

The staff of the Community Health Care Project is volunteer and there 
is no source of funding available to the Project at this time. Funds are 
needed for laboratory equipment, educational materials, and other 
operating expenses. People are encouraged to visit, look through the 
clinic's literature, and talk with the staff. If there is any possibility of 
venereal disease, don't hesitate to come over any Tuesday evening. For 
further information contact John Fisher, 545-2013, 545-2014, Area Code 
413. 




AMHERSTr>^a 



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PLAYING! 



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253-5426 



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MONDAY & TUESDAY BARGAIN NITES - ALL SEATS $1.00 



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Classifieds 

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August. If interested call (02-254-2*41. 

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Paul's Oldtlme Furniture bureaus, beds, 
tables, esoterlca, witty repartee, all at 
bargain prices behind Aubuchons, 
Amherst. 253-3511. 

HELP WANTED 

To write two news releases for ecology 
protect. Call *67 5651 between 4-7 p.m. 




THE NATIONAL OBSERVER 

A BRILLIANT FEAT 
OF MOVIE 
MAKING r 

-TIME MAGAZINE 

It flawlessly 
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-NEWSWEEK 



A OAMELMELNCX Product** 



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hrEPBSf by DM ZElAG G0Q0MAN and SAM PEO0NRIM 

rVaduOKlbyOAMElMELNCK ftmcUid by SAM PEO0NPAH 



«N«RN •*•* •>•»"• 



August 9 • Tonite 

Mahar,6,8, 10 p.m. 



Page 4— Unlvtrsity of Massachusetts— The Crier 

Softball Playoffs 



l) National (Plumbers) 



-LU 



Field 2 
(4) American (Big Sticks) 



Final IM Positions 



Field 1 



(3) Nation*! (Education) 



Field 3 
(1) American (Bio. Psych.) 



Field 2 



(3) American (Pipefitters) 



Field 4 
J2 i ^|l2tjojja^Rinjers^ MB 



Field 5 



(4) National (Ashcan or P.S.E.) 



Field $ 
(1) American (Misfits) 



CAMPUS CHAMPION 



NAMES 
John Windy ka 
Stuart Markow 
Marc Gelinas 
Joe Niemczura 
DaveCignoni 
Bob Slate 
John Cushing 
RussLane 
Mike Shifflett 
Dan Berman 
Rob Gilbert 

NAMES 
Phyllis Olrich 
Lois Capenella 

NAME 
Steve Mosher 
Paul Cihocki 
Jerry Jaeger 
Phyllis Olrich 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

POSITION 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

POSITION 
1 
2 



BICYCLE RACE 



PLACE 
1 
2 
3 
4 



TIME 

8:32.8 

8.53.8 

8:56.0 

9:21.0 

9:26.0 

9:37.0 

10:02.5 

10:08.0 

10:34.5 

10:54.0 

11:05.0 

TIME 

6:07.7 
7:35.5 

TIME 

4:30.0 
4:46.0 
4:48.0 
5:19.2 



Summer IM 's 
Finished 



The 1973 Summer Intramural 
sports schedule is now over its 
regular season and into the 
playoffs. Eight teams are now 
battling for the Softball title, with 
the semifinals being played tonight 
at 5:00 P.M. and the finals Wed- 
nesday night at 5 : 00 P.M. The eight 
teams include Plumbers (8-0), Bio 
Psych (7-1), Misfits (7-1), Big 
Sticks (6-2), Ringers (6-2), 
Pipefitters (6-2), Education (5-3) 
and Ashcan (5-4). 

Important Notice: Individual 
sports participants must report 
their games as soon as possible. 
Unreported games will go as 
forfeits. Playoffs will be scheduled 
this week. If you are in the playoffs 
reports to the IM office to check 
opponents. 




Fall in Love with a Model 



Now open for your inspection are BRANDYWINE's beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments. 

Come over for a visit any day of the week. In a few minutes we'll 
show you all the reasons in the world why BRAND YWINE is a 
better place to live. We invite you to compare features and com- 
pare prices The few minutes you spend with our two beautiful 
models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year. 




(uea) i f M»»l»l • •••",•.«■■ •"•■.•lift* •»!• 




Here are some conveniences which make 
BRANDYWINE so eminently ••liveable": 

Spacious, well laid out units 

All brand name, house sited appliances 

An abundance of closet space 

Individually controlled, central gas heat 
and cooking included in rent. 

Extra security features. 

Large, partially enclosed private patios 
and balconies 
Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
Furniture Leasing Company, Hartford, 
Connecticut 

One bedroom units from $200 
Two bedroom units from $235 



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UNIVtHSITY O* \ 




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Brandy wine at Amherst 



50 Meadow St. 
Amherst 

549-0600 



*m 



J.O.E. Active This Summer 



This summer the J.O.E. (Juvenile Opportunities 
Extension) Program has extended itself even further 
by setting up a "day camp" for the Department of 
Youth Services youth in the Amherst-Springfield- 
Holyoke area. The program is run on a flexible basis 
depending on interest and availability of facilities. 
The staff consists of ten regular members, mostly 
students and graduate students interested in crime 
and delinquency. We have two staff aides from the 
Neighborhood Youth Corps. The staff aides help with 
the kids and work with the staff. We also have 
volunteers who work on special projects. 

The program consists of recreational, educational, 
arts and crafts, and camping activities. The main 
base is located on the second floor of Boyden Gym, as 
is also the alternative school. Boyden Gymnasium, its 
related sports equipment, Hicks pool have been 
gladly made available by the Physical Education 
Dept. The Arts and Crafts Center run by the Students 
Activities Office has made their facilities available to 
the program. The participants have enjoyed two 
camping trips as yet. Both were two day trips to 
Martha's Vineyard and to Stratton Mountain in 
Vermont. Others are planned, hopefully winding up 
the summer with a four day trip to the White 
Mountains of New Hampshire. 

The group has taken various field trips. Some have 



been to the Museum of Science in Boston, Friendly's 
ice cream plant in Wilbraham, Coca-Cola Co. in 
Hartford, Conn, a Yankees game in New York City 
and a Red Sox game at Fenway Park. 

The Alternative School has given the kids a chance 
to catch up on missed work in case they are returning 
to school, or as a preparation for their High School 
Equivalency Exam. The school offers a wide range of 
reading and learning materials and is open all day. 

The Arts and Crafts Center has been very suc- 
cessful in teaching these youth some craft skills. 
Some of the youths plan to sell their crafts at a table 
in the Campus Center Concourse. 

The program will conclude on August 25, 1973 with a 
pecial summer sports Olympics program for the 
Department of Youth Services youth and staff. In- 
vitations have been sent to the Speaker of the House 
of Representatives, David M. Bartley, to D.Y.S. 
Acting Commissioner Joseph M. Leavey , both of their 
staffs, to the seven state regional staff offices of 
D.Y.S. and to all halfway houses who provide ser- 
vices to the state regarding delinquent youths. 

The purpose of the Olympics is to provide youth and 
staff the opportunity to interact in a one day program 
consisting of track and field events. Individual and 
group awards will be presented at a sports banquet 
planned for that evening. 





August 9, 1973 



University of Massachusetts 



Volume 2, Issue 14 




a********************************]! 
* Campus Carousel 

Hoers Live 



Cheap 




.£. HOE, HOE, HOE is the headline 
sl over an Indiana Daily Student 
j^ story about vegetable gardens 
jl, being nurtured this summer at the 
.u. IU campus. 

jt Students are taking advantage of 
£, plots rented by the Married 



I 

I was nearly swept from my feet at ¥r 
what I found within these -5»r 
heretofore pristine chambers: ¥r 
COUCHES FOR THE LADIES! #» 
"In retrospect, of course, I ■}{• 
regret this loss >• innocense, this %r 
unfortunate violation. And cer- 3tr 



2 Students Council. They're trying to tainly the stark pastel reality of £ 



jf. prove that two can live as cheaply 
jl as one, if one is a good hoer. 

M, COUCHES FOR MS'S is the 
jf. complaint of a letter-writer to the 
j£ editor of the US of Fla Oracle. 
^ The male chauvinist you-know- 
.u. what who gives this grip admits to 
.£ initiating "certain surreptitious 
.£. activities designed to facilitate an 
.£. understanding of female 
.£. bathrooms at this university. Prior 
.£. to these activities, these rooms had 



inequality which confronted me -Jf- 
would induce trauma in any per- ^t 
sons life. Yet, I collect my #■ 
faculties and present to all who will -X" 
listen to my indignation! "X- 

"Why do women deserved 
opulence, special favors, gentle •£ 
airs (specifically these couches* 
which seem to occupy nearly 50 per * 
cent of the women's rooms) when* 
men are banished to cold Spartan * 
chambers???? * 

These couches must go - or * 



Here Tonight 



Jb lUUICBCatUVIUCO, UICOC luuilia iiuu • ■ • ^ i. 

* been objects of intense mystery of appropriate blue comforts must be * 

* myself, having had, as a male, only provided for the men." 

sl rare exposure to them. * , _ . . a b 

* "In the still of the night, on a POET'S CORNER in the Trinity * 
2 chance passing during a lull in U. Tripod carries a poem on Spring* 
^classes, I entered these sane- fever. It's title is "VernaH 
*tuaries( after knocking, of course). Disease." > . .... , . . ff 



Dancers 



The UMass University Dancers 
will be the only dance company 
from the United States performing 
at the 7th International Congress 
on Physical Education and Sport 
for Girls and Women, Aug. 19 
through 25 in Teheran, Iran. 

The University Dancers will 
leave Aug. 12 for Italy, where they 
will give a performance in Anzio, 
36 miles from Rome. After a week 
in Italy, the dancers will depart for 
Teheran, where they will perform 
Aug. 21 for the Congress and Aug. 
25 in a concert arranged by the 
Iran- American Society. 

A final performance will be in 
Greece. The performance is slated 
for Patras, the oldest Roman ruins, 
in an outdoor theatre, or aboard 
the USS Forestal, which will be in 
dock at that time. 

The group, under the direction of 
Marilyn V. Patton and associate 
director Andrea Watkins, will 
travel with twelve student dancers 
and two technical crew- 
Christopher Rudkin, stage 
manager, and Kevin MacDougall, 
sound technician. The dancers 
have worked hard and long during 



the past academic year to raise the 
necessary $12,000 for the trip. They 
have given 26 performances 
throughout New England, have 
raffled off a trip to Bermuda, sold 
cookies and brownies, as well as 
souvenir booklets, and received 
generous support from the many 
patrons, sponsors, and friends, for 
which they are indeed grateful. 

The University Dancers will be 
in concert on Thursday, Aug. 9 at 8 
p.m. in Bowker Auditorium at 
UMass to present the same 
program they will perform in Italy, 
Iran and Greece. The dancers are 
still $1000 short of their goal for 
that tour and hope that the concert 
proceeds will help them reach it. 
Tickets may be obtained at the 
door or through the Fine Arts 
Council in Herter Hall. 

The group is composed of men 
and women from many academic 
areas, most of them either 
majoring in dance through the 
Bachelor Degree with Individual 
Concentration (BDIC) Program, 
or in the dance concentration 
program through the School of 
Physical Education. Several are 



graduate students, one in French 
and the other in sport ad- 
ministration. Two young women 
who graduated in 1972 as dance 
concentration students remained 
in Amherst so that they could 
obtain more performance ex- 
perience before going on with their 
own dance career. Most of the 
dancers hope to have careers in 
performing and will soon head for 
Boston and New York in pursuit of 
a professional dance career, 
others will pursue graduate 
degrees and hope to teach at the 
college level in the future. 

The program of dances to be 
performed includes 14 dances from 
the University Dancers repertory, 
as well as a new ballet solo by Judi 
Olson. The majority of dances are 
modern dance, the only art form 
indigenous to the United States. 
The styles vary greatly from the 
very dramatic "Encounters" by 
Andres Watkins, to "My Reindeer 
Flies Backward," a very amusing 
spoof on ballet by the same 
choreographer. "Scorpio" by 
Marcia Thomas brings the lively 
style of jazz to the stage, and 



"Tarcosic Dialogue" by Daniel A. 
Peterson shows the use of the voice 
for accompaniment in dance. 
"Espiritu Libre" by William 
Serralles is a dynamic solo that 
exhibits man's search for the free 
self and shows uncanny control in 
movement that soars from the 
very fast to very slow. 

University Dancers has been in 
existence since the fall of 1970 
when it first put on a lecture- 
demonstration at the Northfield- 
Mt. Hermon School, and continued 
to give six more performances that 
year off campus, and three per- 
formances on campus. Since that 
time University Dancers combined 
with the University Concert Dance 
Group to give four nights of con- 
certs in the fall, and four in the 
spring of each year. Last year, the 
group gave a record 18 per- 
formances off campus. The first 
January tour, in 1973, proved 
extremely successful, with the 
dancers performing eight concerts 
in 10 days, throughout New 
England. The majority of concerts 
were given in junior and senior 



high schools, where there is an 
amazing interest in dance by both 
the boys and girls. Master classes 
were given in most schools and 
were received enthusiastically. In 
February, the dancers assisted in a 
High School Dance Workshop 
offered through Continuing 
Education, and many of the 
students performed before at- 
tending the three day session. 

The dance faculty at the 
University all make a contribution 
to the group, either through 
choreography, direction, per- 
forming or musical direction. 

The dancers are: Robert 
Chiarelli of Amherst; Barton 
Drake of Amherst; Carol Flechner 
of Levittown, NY.; Paula Frausini 
MacDougall of New London, 
Conn.; Karen Scott Rudkin of 
Springfield; Judi Olson of Wor- 
cester; David Smith and Bruce 
Smith of Princeton; William 
Serralles of Bronx, N.Y. ; Janice 
Schleiger of Santa Monica, Cal.; 
Marcia Thomas of Kingston; and 
Patricia Warner of Shirley. 



The Crier— University of Massachusetts— P»9« 3 



Page 2 — University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Crier | 

The Crier is a semiweeKly publication of the Summer session 1973, University of 
Massachusetts Offices are located on the second floor of the Student Union (Room 402), 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01002. The staff is entirely 
responsible for the contents. No copy is censored by the Administration before 
publication. Represented for national advertising by National Educational Advert.s.ng 
Services, Inc. 



Consumer Questions 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor-Business Manager 

News Editor 



Stephen G.Tripoli 

Gib Fullerton 

Cindy Gonet 




Consumer questions should be sent to Atty. Gen. 
Robert H. Quinn, "Consumer Questions", Room 373, 
State House, Boston, Mass. 02133. Those questions 
with broadest interest will be answered in the 
column. 

Q. Each August I take my car for a tune-up before my 
summer vacation. But when I went to the garage to 
pick up my car, the bill was three times what I ex- 
pected. After reading over the bill, I discovered that 
"unnecessary repairs" had been done. I don't want 
this to happen again. What can I do to prevent this 
practice? 

A. The owner and the service man should agree on 
what work is going to be done. The owner should be 
present when the mechanic writes out the 
authorization sheet. This insures that there is a 
written statement of the terms. This statement is a 
contract, however informal, and is subject to the 
same laws as any other contract. A contract cannot 
be changed by either party unless both parties know 
of and agree to it. If a garage intentionally makes 
unnecessary repairs, the act may be termed a 
deceptive practice under the Massachusetts Con- 
sumer Protection Act. 



»*♦* 



Q. Recently I noticed an ad for a private training 
school endorsed by a famous person whom I know. 
When I asked her about the school she said that she 



knew nothing about it and was not endorsing the 
school's course. Isn't this practice illegal? 
A. Under Massachusetts law, no sales or advertising 
claim may distort the quality of a school or its faculty 
members. Any connection to a state or federal 
agency and any endorsement from a famous person 
or from the Veterans Administration must be valid. 
Furthermore, famous personalities advertised as 
faculty members must provide more than token 
instruction. Deceptive or misleading diplomas are 
also outlawed. 

**** 

Q. This spring I had my basement waterproofed with 
a special clay sealer which was shot into the ground 
at the point of leak in the foundation. Is this process 

valid? 

A. The Consumer Protection Division has received a 
large number of complaints concerning basement 
waterproofing companies. The problem of stopping 
leakage may involve not only prevention of a 
seepage but also a redirection of the water flow. In 
many cases, when the clay sealer is forced into the 
ground under hydrostatic pressure, the water is 
merely diverted from one location to another and 
may come into the basement through another wall. 
Reputable local contractors or plumbers should be 
consulted to determine your needs. 



c 
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01 

"5 
u. 

a 

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o 

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Women Vets Eligible 



Sam has found that it is best to 
turn to grass for relief. You see 
today is the last issue of The Crier 
so Sam must find other outlets. 



******************************* 



* 

* 
* 





■* 

Here's Tuesday's contest win- « 
ner, Al Fineburg of Brandywine ^ 
Apartments. It just goes to show ^ 
that even the people at WMUA can ^ 
guess the Crier Quiz. ^. 

* 



More than two-thirds of the women veterans 
believed to be eligible for education and training 
under the current GI Bill have not yet used these 
benefits, and time is running out for those discharged 
before June 1, 1966. 

This warning came from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration, which also noted most of these VA 
education benefits for veterans discharged before 
June 1, 1966 will expire on May 31, 1974, although this 
expiration date does not apply to on-the-job or ap- 
prenticeship training. 

The remainder of the veterans eligible have eight 
years from the date of their discharge to complete 
their training. 

About 100,000 of the 144,000 women who left military 
service since January 31, 1955 have not yet taken 
training under the GI Bill, according to VA. 

This date (end of the Korean Conflict) marks the 
beginning of the period of military service making 
veterans eligible for benefits under the current GI 
Bill, which became law May 31, 1966. 

About 30 percent of the 144,000 women potentially 
eligible have used all or part of their education 
benefits. 

Vietnam Era women veterans, like Vietnam Era 
male veterans, are attending school under the GI Bill 



in large numbers. 

The spring 1973 semester enrolled 16,600 women 
veterans under the GI Bill. Most of those who have 
trained have been in college. As of April, 27,440 of the 
44,000 who have used their GI Bill had chosen college, 
and about 300 were job training. 

To date, Air Force leads the services with 13,157 
women veterans who have enrolled under the current 
GI Bill. The Army has 11,814; Navy, 10,895; the 
Marine Corps, 3,863; the Coast Guard, 17; and the 
Public Health Service, National Oceanic and At- 
mospheric Administration, and others 4,443. 

VA reminds women veterans that their military 
experience, especially in the health care field, often 
provides an excellent basis for further education and 
training, and that VA is a leader in university- 
affiliated health care training and in equal em- 
ployment opportunity for women. 

Women serve as VA hospital directors and as chiefs 
and directors in VA medical and allied health care 
fields, including the top agency posts in pathology 
and allied sciences, medical administration, allied 
health training, nursing, and dietetics. 

Women also hold many non-medical administrative 
posts in VA, including jobs as personnel officers in VA 
hospitals and regional offices across the country. 



Theatre To Tour Amherst 



Here's todays mystery man, a well known figure 
at UMasg? The hint is that if you don't watch your 
money he will watch it for you, so keep it in a safe 
place folks. The first person to come to The Crier 
office, and correctly identify him, can have him. 



The Masque Ensemble 
Workshop in Children's Theatre 
will tour the Amherst area and 
environs this week with their 
production of The Giving Tree by 
Shel Silverstein. The cast for the 
production consists of summer 
school students at the University of 
Massachusetts. The purpose of the 
workshop is to create entertaining 
theatre for all ages from classics in 
children's literaure. 

Floyd Bailey, workshop director, 
has worked in children's theatre 
for several years and has directed 
several productions including 
Elvira Everything and Jerome. 
Mr. Bailey has also acted in 
productions of Frankenstein, In- 
dians, Clouds, and Bell, Book, and 
Candle among others. The 
assistant director for The Giving 
Tree is Julie Becket. Ms. Becket 
has been active with the Amherst 



community musical group, 
directing the productions of 
Winnie-the-Pooh in 1972 and 
designing costumes for the recent 
community production of Babes in 
Toyland. 

The Giving Tree, which will be 
presented along with selections 
from Remy Charlip's Arm-in-Arm 
and numbers by the workshop 
Kazoo Band, was first presented in 
conjunction with the University of 
Massachusetts Rainbow Festival 
of the Arts and on August 6 by the 
Campus Pond. On August 7 the 
group will be appearing on the 
Amherst Commons at 7:00 p.m., 
and on August 8 they will be on the 
Rotary Lawn in the Rolling Green 
Apartment complex also at 7:00 
p.m. The public is invited to attend 
either of these performances free 
of charge. 



Benefit performances will be 
given on Thursday, August 9 at the 
Belchertown State School and on 
Friday, August 10 at the Salvation 
Army Camp in Sabago Lake, 
Maine. 



Classifieds 

FOR SALE BARGAINS 

Paul's Oldtime Furniture bureaus, beds, 
tables, esoterica, witty repartee, all at 
bargain prices behind Aubuchonv, 
Amherst 253 3511. 

ROOM WANTED 
Wanted Room for Sept. 1st. Can pay uplo 
70 Call Ruth after 4:30pm 253 2831 

1 8/U 



WANTED 
Responsible person wanted to drive car to 
Los Angeles, California at the end of 
August If interested call 802 254 2441 

18 14 



Infirmary 



%****************************** 



ergency) 



Friday 



(54) 5-2671 



John Morgan 

Returns 
to The Pub 



/IMMfOi»Ti\ /CONTACTS. 
♦ MINT.ON W tlMS L 

. IMlRcV. f 1 SUPPLIES F 

v. «ip»i»i y v*ll niHoy 




y/tmjwryt Optical /3h47r>pe 



lil.'i North Plrusiinf «M, 
Tt-I. ■'.,(,-*. IU J 



\mhrrsl 



Creation 

Antiques 

the finest in 

clothes 
jewelry 
glass 
etcetera 

Amherst Carriage Shops 
235 No. Pleasant St. 

We buy & trade, too. 



Friday 



UMass Grad In Botswana For Peace Corps 



GABERONE, Botswana - Every 
year, hundreds of sport hunters 
come to this Texas-sized African 
republic in pursuit of the abundant 
wild game: lions, elephants, 
buffalo, leopards, zebras, hippos, 
wildebeest, antelope and many 
more species. The people of Bot- 
swana also hunt the wildlife for 
more basic reasons: for meat to 
feed their families and for skins, 



Assigned ' to the Botswana 
Department of Wildlife and 
National Parks, Butynski is 
working to help this southern 
African nation make the maximum 
use of its revenue-producing 
wildlife resources without en- 
dangering the survival of any 
species. 

A graduate of the University of 
Massachusetts in Amherst. 



bles a miniature kangaroo, can be 
hunted and killed without 
restriction, and for many Bot- 
swana-residents of Botswana -it is 
the staple meat source. But, 
besides being a major meat 
source -an estimated 2.5 million 
are killed each year for food-the 
springhare is a crop predator. 
Butynski estimated that 
springhare eat between 10 and 15 




hooves and horns to sell for cash 
income. 

The Botswana government 
knows the importance of, its 
wildlife as a national resource and 
sets aside a fifth of its land area - 
more than any other country in the 
world - as national parks and 
game reserves. To prevent hunters 
from decimating popular species 
of animals, it issues hunting 
licenses and shooting quotas based 
upon careful studies of the number 
and movement of each species. 

These studies, basic to the set- 
ting of reasonable hunting quotas, 
are the job of wildlife biologist 
Thomas M. Butynski, a Peace 
Corps volunteer from Greenfield, 
Mass. 






Butynski', 25, is the son of Mr. and percent of all the corn, sorghum, 

bean and peanut crops grown in the 
country. 

"The government wants to learn 
more about the springhare," he 
said of his research program. 
"They don't want it around crops, 
but in other areas they do want it 
as a meat source." 

Butynski is also assisting his 
supervisor, a U.N. Food and 
Agricultural Organization wildlife 
ecologist working with the Bot- 
swana wildlife department, in a 
major study of elephant and 
buffalo movement within the 
country. 

Using dart guns loaded with 
tranquilizers, he and a team of 



Mrs. Michael J. Butynski of 370 
Colrain Road, Greenfield. Now 
winding up his first two-year tour 
of Peace Corps service, he has 
signed on for an additional year as 
a Peace Corps volunteer to con- 
tinue his work and to train a 
Botswana resident to take over his 
job. 

Besides studying population 
trends and geographic movements 
of each species protected under 
Botswana's controlled hunting 
laws, Butynski is conducting an 
intensive research project on the 
springhare, a large, furry, noc- 
turnal rodent found only in 
southern Africa. 



The springhare, which resem- biologists and game wardens have 



"shot" 35 elephants from 
helicopters and Land Rovers to 
freeze-brand them with liquid 
nitrogen and apply ear tags and 
collars. The veterinary depart- 
ment has helped them to similarly 
mark 90 buffalo while taking blood 
tests for foot and mouth disease. 
Game wardens, safari operators 
and other persons who spot the 
marked animals will notify the 
wildlife department, which will use 
these reports to trace the animals' 
movements. 

Butynski 's main assignment for 
the past two years has been to help 
the government determine hunting 
quotas by analyzing the movement 
and numbers of species hunted 
under license by recreational and 
traditional hunters. 

Under Botswana's hunting 
controls, sport hunters are 
required to purchase licenses 
which specify the area in which 
they may shoot and the number of 
each species they may take. Fees 
vary with the status of an animal 
as a game prize; a permit to shoot 
a lion, for example, is the most 
expensive at $750. 

Each hunting party is assigned a 
game scout who travels with them 
to make sure they do not exceed 
their quota or take other animals 
they are not licensed to shoot. Each 
hunter must report every animal 
killed, along with information on 
when and where he killed it. 

Tribesmen who depend on hunt- 
ing for their livelihood, except the 
nomadic Bushmen, also must 
obtain licenses at taken fees and 
report their -kills. 

The hunters' reports go to 
Butynski, who analyzes them to 
determine approximate numbers 
of animals in an area, animal 
population trends and the 
movement of animals within the 
country. The government uses 
these studies to set shooting quotas 
for the next season and decide 
whether to halt the hunting of 
declining species or encourage the 
hunting of animals whose numbers 
are growing. 

For example, Butynski said, the 
government now is encouraging 
hunters to take out licenses for 
elephants and buffalo, whose 
numbers are growing, while 
keeping a careful eye on the 
declining number of wildebeest. 
Hunting is no longer permitted for 



protected animals such as 
waterbuck, cheetah, giraffes, and 
black and white rhinoceros. 

Butynski also is responsible for 
compiling and analyzing reports 
from trophy dealers and 
manufacturers of wildlife 
products, who must report every 
two months the number and prices 
of animals purchased. These 
reports give him a more complete 
picture of traditional hunting in 
Botswana, since tribesmen sell 
virtually all their take of prized 
game animals such as lions and 
zebras to the trophy dealers. 

Gobernment statistics show that 
about 50,000 animals are killed 
under license in Botswana per 
year, with about 90 percent taken 
by traditional hunters who kill for 
meat and skins. Butynski 
estimates, however, that the actual 
number of animals killed is four 
times as high because of illegal 
poaching. 

Butynski is one of about 90 Peace 
Corps volunteers serving in Bot- 
swana in a variety of education, 
public health, teacher training, 
agriculture, skilled trades, 
economic planning, wildlife and 
specialized programs. 

Born and raised in Greenfield, he 
graduated from Greenfield High 
School in 1966 and received an 
associate of arts degree from 
Greenfield College two years later. 
He earned a bachelor's degree in 
wildlife biology in 1970 from the 
University of Massachusetts and 
took a year of graduate studies 
there before joining the Peace 
Corps in 1971. Butynski plans to 
complete his studies for a master's 
degree in wildlife biology at 
Michigan Sta University in East 
Lansing whew he returns to the 
United States next year. 

Around the world, about 7,000 
Americans are serving as Peace 
Corps volunteers in 58 developing 
countries. 

ACTION'S domestic programs 
are Volunteers in Service to 
America (VISTA), Foster Grand- 
parent Program, Service Corps of 
Retired Executives (SCORE), 
Active Corps of Executives (ACE), 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program 
(RSVP) and University Year for 
ACTION. 



Continuing Ed. Fall Courses 



The Division of Continuing 
Education at the University of 
Massachusetts is offering nearly 
100 evening courses this fall, all 
University accredited and on a 
wide variety of topics. 

The division offers regular in- 
troductory and upper level 
University courses and provides 
degree programs for qualified 
students. Any person who has 
f i ll 



graduated from high school or who 
has a Certificate of General 
Education Development is entitled 
to enroll in courses offered by the 
Division of Continuing Education. 
However, acceptance into a degree 
program is contingent upon the 
student's subsequent class per- 
formance. 

Some of the less traditional 
course offerings include: an an- 



* *AT THF # ("aTES * *- 
OF SMITH COLLEGE 




OdVilSC; 

1 NORTHAMPTON # 



Visit 
The 6th 
Oldest Theatre 
In The U.S. 

NOW SHOWING 
7:00 & 9:00 



thropology course called Magic 
and Witchcraft; a chemistry 
course about the Biochemical and 
Analytical Chemical Aspects of 
Winemaking; a comparative 
literature course entitled Horror in 
Film and Literature; and an 
education course - Maintaining 
Sanity in the Classroom. 

Mail registration for the fall 
term began July 30. There is no 
registration fee for student ap- 
plications received before Aug. 24. 
A $5 registration fee is required of 
all students who register after Aug. 
26. Graduate and undergraduate 
in-person registration will be held 
Aug. 27 through Sept. 1 in Wor- 
cester Dining Commons 



registration will be held Sept. 4 
through Sept. 6 in 320 Arnold House 
from 12 to 7 p.m. Classes begin 
Sept. 7. 

Anyone interested in obtaining a 
catalog or arranging academic 
couseling should write to: Evening 
Program, 213 Arnold House, 



University of 
Amherst 01002. 



Massachusetts, 



Wanted 

Cocktail Waitresses 
and Waitresses 

for Immediate and 
Fall Employment 
at The Chequers 

Interviewing 
Wed., Aug. 15th 1-3 P.M. 



• • • 



There's not another love story 
around at the moment that 
can come near its quality. 
'Limelight' illustrates anew 
Chaplin's genius!" 

—WILLIAM WOLF. Cu« 



CHARLES CHAPLIN'S 




LIMELIGHT 



STARTS 

NEXT 

WEDNESDAY! "LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL" 




TONIGHT 

Dustin Hoffman in "Str3W DOgS" 

Mahar Auditorium - 6, 8, 10 p.m. 






Page 4— University of Massachusetts— The Crier 



Amherst's Tire Store- 






r ,,,}„ 






Firestone Shell Jetzon 
MICHELIN X Veith JireCL! 

Le Havre Radial Tires ■--- Steel Belted 



Notices 



Professional American & 
Foreign Car Repair 




h PLAZA SHELL® 



! 



Amherst — Northampton Road 

Between University Drive & Stop & Shop 

253-9000 








Old 
Weird Harolds 

NEW & USED CLOTHES 

RT. 9 BETWEEN AMHERST & NORTHAMPTON 

MOH.-SAT. 10:00-8:00 T«l..«h eai o-r^-. 

THU0S. 4 mi. 1110:00 Telephone 586-3727 

—►SALE 

USED JEANS 

USED FLANNELS & BLUE 
WORK SHIRTS 2for $ 2 

USED OVERALLS & 
COVERALLS 

USED VESTS 

ARMY PANTS 

NEW 

SLEEPING BAGS 

PLUS OUR NEW MALE 
UFO & SEAFARER JEANS 

FOR $C A 

ONLY *^«V 



UMass Outing Club Trips 

Thursday, August 9, Rock- 
climbing, Rappeling and Caving at 
Rattlesnake Gutter in Leverett. 
Leaves at 5:PM from the C.C. Bus 

Circle in front of Stockbridge Hall. 

* * • 

Saturday, August 11, to Sunday 
August 12, Backpacking on the 
Long Trail in Vermont's Green 
Mountains, An introductory hiking 
trip that will be real nice for those 
wishing to clear their head before 
exams next week. Leaves at 9:30 
AM Saturday morning from the 
C.C. Bus Circle in front of Sto- 
ckbridge Hall. If you need any 
equipment check at the Club's 
Equipment Room this week. YOU 
MUST SIGN UP FOR THIS TRIP 
ON THE BULLETIN BOARD. 

• • a 

Outing Club Equipment Room 
has been relocated to Room SU415 
in the Student Union, operating 
hours are 11:50 AM to 1:00 PM on 
Tues., Wed., and Thurs. Or by 
special arrangement. Bulletin 
Board is presently on the floor 
outside the Ladies (Ms.) Room on 



the first floor of the Student Union, 
check it. 



* * * 



SMALL CLAIMS COURT 
ADVISORY SERVICE 

A Small Claims Court Advisory 
service will be available to those 
people interested in or having 
questions or problems pertaining 
to the nature and function of the 
Small Claims Court. This service 
will be offered by John Lynn, who 
will be located in the WMPIRG 
(Western Mass. Public Interest 
Research Group) office, 2nd floor 
Student Union from 11:30 a.m. to 1 
p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays, commencing on 
August 1, and ending on August 15. 
The booklet "How To Sue In Small 
Claims Court", as well as other 
literature will be available to those 
interested. Phone number during 
the above hours is 545-0712. For 
further information contact 
WMPIRG Regional Office, 

Amherst 256-6434. 

♦ * * 

FRENCH MUSIC 

Monday evening at 8 PM 
WMUA's International Music 



series will feature popular music 
from France. Ms. Kathy Knudson 
of the UMass French Department 
will join host Joe C. to play and talk 
about the wide variety of Gallic 
Music listened to today, from 
popular ballads to timeless 
drinking songs. 
WMUA, 91.1FM: STEREO. 



* * 



NOTICE: As of July 9, 1973 all 
pets will be banned from the 
Campus Center/Student Union 
Complex with the one exception 
being seeing-eye dogs. 



Immanuel 
Lutheran Church 

867 N. Pleasant 
Amherst. Mass. 

(adjacent to U.M. School of 

Education) 

THE SERVICE— 

9:30 A.M. SUNDAYS 

All Welcome! 

Rev. Richard E. Koenig, 
Pastor 549-0322 





$7eo or 2 for $12 



Fall in Love with a Model 



No* >pen lor your inspection are BRANDYWINE s beautiful new 
one and two bedroom model apartments 

i time over for a visit any day of the week In a few minutes we'll 
show vou all the reasons in the world why BRAND YWINE is a 
better place to live We invite you to compare features and com 
pare prices The few minutes you spend with our two beautiful 
models could be the most important minutes you'll spend all year 




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All brand name, house sized appliances 

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Large, partially enclosed private patios 
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Luxurious wall-to-wall carpeting 
Safe playground for children 

Laundry facilities well located 

Congenial, energetic resident manager 
responsible for all apartment services and 
maintenance 

Rental furniture available from Putnam 
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One bedroom units from $200 
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Brandy wine at Amherst 



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